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Full text of "The student's Chaucer, being a complete edition of his works"

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1851 

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THE STUDENT'S 

Chaucer 



BEING 



% Compfefe (Bbttion of %% n3?orft6 

EDITED 

FROM NUMEROUS MANUSCRIPTS 
BY THE 

REV. WALTER W. SKEAT 

LITT.D., LL.D., PH.D., M.A. 

ELRINGTON AND BOSWORTH PROFESSOR OF ANGLO-SAXON IN THE 
UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE 




MACMILLAN AND CO. 

AND LONDON 
1895 

All rights reserved 



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Copyright, 1894, 
By MACMILLAN AND CO. 



Norfajooli ^rfgg : 
S. Gushing & Co. — Berwick & Smith. 
Boston, Mass., U.S.A. 



AMPLISSIMO PHILOSOPHORVM 

ACADEMIAE FRIDERICIANAE HALENSIS 

CVM VITEBERGENSI CONSOCIATAE ORDINI 

CVIVS EX DECRETO 

DIE III. M. AVGVSTI A. MDCCCXCIV 

QVO DIE SACRA BISAECVLARIA VNIVERSITATIS 

SOLEMNITER PERAGEBANTVR 

AD GRADVM DOCTORIS HONORIS CAVSA 

PROVECTVS SVM 

HVNC LIBRVM GRATO ANIMO 

D. D. 



CONTENTS 



Introduction : — 

Life of Chaucer 

Writings of Chaucer and Early Editions 



PAGE 

vii 
xii 



Brief Account of the Grammar, Metre, Versification, and Pro- 
nunciation xiv 



Rom aunt of the Rose: 



Fragment A 
Fragment B 
Fragment C 



The Minor Poems: — 

I. An A. B.C. 

II, The Compleynte unto Pite 

III. The Book of the Duchesse 

IV. The Compleynt of Mars . 

V. The Parlement of Foules . 

VI. A Compleint to his Lady . 

VII. Anelida and Arcite . 

VIII. Chancers Wordes unto Adam 

IX. The Former Age 

X. Fortune .... 

XL Merciles Beaute 

XII. To Rosemounde : A Balade 

XIII. Truth .... 

XIV. Gentilesse .... 
XV. Lak of Stedfastnesse . 

XVI. Lenvoy de Chaucer a Scogan 

XVII. Lenvoy de Chaucer a Bukton 

XVIII. The Compleynt of Venus . 

XIX. The Compleint of Chaucer to his Empty Purse 

XX. Proverbs .... 

XXI. Against Women Unconstant 

XXI I. An Amorous Compleint (Compleint Damours 

XXIII. A Balade of Compleynt . 

XXIV. Womanly Noblesse . 

V 



I 

i8 

59 

79 
8i 

83 

97 

10 1 

III 

113 
118 
118 
119 
121 
121 
122 
122 
123 
123 
124 

125 
126 
126 
127 
127 
129 
129 



VI 



Contents. 



BOETHIUS DE CONSOLATIONE PHILOSOPHIC 130 

Troilus and CRISEVDE 206 

The Hous of Fame 326 

The Legend of Good Women 349 



A Treatise on the Astrolabe 

The Canterbury Tales: — 

Group A. The Prologue 

The Knightes Tale 
The Miller's Prologue 
The Milleres Tale . 
The Reeve's Prologue 
The Reves Tale 
The Cook's Prologue 
The Cokes Tale 



Group B. Introduction to the Man of Law's Prologue 

The Prologue of the ALinnes Tale of Lawe 

The Tale of the Man of Lawe 

The Shipman's Prologue 

The Shipmannes Tale . 

The Prioress's Prologue 

The Prioresses Tale 

Prologue to Sir Thopas 

Sir Thopas 

Prologue to Melibeus 

The Tale of Melibeus . 

The Monk's Prologue . 

The Monkes Tale: — Lucifer. Adam. Sampson. Hercules 
Nabugodonosor. Balthasar, Cenobia, De Petro rege 
Ispannie. De Petro Rege de Cipro. De Barnabo de Lum- 
bardia. De Hugelino. Nero. De Oloferno. De Rege 
Anthiocho, De Alexandro. De lulio Cesare. Cresus 

The Prologue of the Nonne Prestes Tale 

The Nonne Preestes Tale 

Epilogue to the Nonne Preestes Tale 



396 



419 
430 
457 
459 
467 
468 
474 
474 

475 
476 

477 
492 
492 

498 
498 
502 
502 
505 
505 
530 



531 
542 
543 
551 



Group C. The Phisiciens Tale 551 

The Prologue of the Pardoneres Tale 556 

The Pardoneres Tale 558 



Contents, 



vn 



Group D. The Wife of Bath's Prologue 
The Tale of the Wyf of Bathe 
The Friar's Prologue 
The Freres Tale . 
The Somnour's Prologue 
The Soinnours Tale 

Group E. The Clerk's Prologue . 
The Clerkes Tale . 
The Merchant's Prologue 
The Marchantes Tale . 
Epilogue to the Marchantes Tale 

Group F. The Squieres Tale 

The Wordes of the Franklin 
The Franklin's Prologue 
The Frankeleyns Tale . 

Group G. The Seconde Xonnes Tale . 

The Canon's Yeoman's Prologue 
The Chanouns Yemannes Tale 

Group H. The Manciple's Prologue 
The Maunciples Tale . 

Group I. The Parson's Prologue . 
The Persones Tale 

Appendix: Variations and Emendations 



PAGE 

565 

576 
581 
582 

587 
588 

596 

597 
612 
613 
627 

628 
636 
637 
637 

649 
657 
659 

669 
670 

674 
675 

719 



Glossary to Chaucer's Works , . 

Glossary to Fragments D and C of the Romaunt of the Rose 



133 



X IntrotJuctiott. 

him in London on November 22, 1373. This visit of his to Italy is of great importance, 
as it exercised a marked influence on his writings, and enables us to understand the 
development of his genius. 

1374. His conduct during this mission to Italy met with the full approval of the 
king, who, on the celebration of the great festival at Windsor on St. George's day 
(April 23) in 1374, granted our poet a pitcher of wine daily, to be received from the 
king's butler. On May 10 of the same year, Chaucer took a lease of a house in Aid- 
gate, for the term of his life, from the Corporation of London ; but he afterwards gave 
it up to a friend in October, 1386 ; and it is probable that he had ceased to reside in it 
for a year or more previously. On June 8, 1374, he was appointed to the important 
office of Comptroller of the Customs and Subsidy of Wools, Skins, and Leather, for 
the port of London ; and a few days later (June 13) received a life-pension of 10/. 
from the duke of Lancaster for the good service rendered by him and his wife Philippa 
to the said Duke, to his consort, and to his mother the Queen. This is the first 
mention of Philippa Chaucer as Geoffrey's wife, though a Philippa Chaucer is men- 
tioned as one of the Ladies of the Chamber to Queen Philippa, on September 12, 
1366, and subsequently. It has been conjectured that Chaucer was not married 
till 1374, and that he married a relative, or at least some one bearing the same name 
as himself ; but this supposition is needless and improbable; there is no reason why 
the Philippa Chaucer mentioned in 1366 may not have been already married to the 
poet, who was then at least 26 years of age. 

1375. In 1375 his income was increased by receiving from the Crown (Novem- 
ber 8) the custody of the lands and person of one Edmond Staplegate, of Kent. This 
he retained for three years, during which he received 104/.; together with some smaller 
sums from another source. 

1376. On July 12, 1376, the king granted Chaucer the sum of 71/. 4s. 6^., being the 
value of a fine paid by one John Kent for shipping wool without paying the duty 
thereon. Towards the end of this year, Sir John Burley and Geoffrey Chaucer were 
employed upon some secret service, for which the latter received 6/. 13^'. 4d. 

1377. In February, 1377, Chaucer was employed on a secret mission to Flanders, 
and received for it, in all, the sum of 30/. In April he was sent to France, to treat 
for peace with king Charles V. ; for this service he received, in all, the sum of 
48/. 13^'. 4d. On June 21, king Edward III. died, and was succeeded by his grandson, 
Richard II. 

1378. In January, Chaucer seems to have been employed in France. Soon after- 
wards, he was again sent to Italy, from May 28 to September 19, being employed on 
a mission to Lombardy, to treat with Bernabo Visconti, duke of Milan ; to whose 
death (in 1385) the poet alludes in his Monkes Tale (11. 3589-3596) , where he describes 
him as — 

' Of Melan grete Barnabo Viscounte, 
God of delyt, and scourge of Lumbardye.' 

Before leaving England on this business, Chaucer appointed his friend John Gower, 
the poet, as one of his agents to represent him in his absence. 

1380. By deed of May i, 1380, one Cecilia Chaumpayne released Chaucer from a 
charge which she had brought against him, ' de raptu meo.' We have no means of 
ascertaining either the nature of the charge, or the circumstances of the case. 

1382. We have seen that Chaucer had been appointed Comptroller of the Wool 



%itz of Cf)aucer. xi 

Customs in 1374. Whilst still retaining this office, he was now also appointed Comp- 
troller of the Petty Customs (May 8, 1382). 

1385. In February, 1385, he was allowed the great privilege of nominating a per- 
manent deputy to perform his duties as Comptroller. It is highly probable that he 
owed this favour to ' the good queen Anne,' first wife of king Richard II.; for, in the 
Prologue to the Legend of Good Women, probably written during this period of his 
newly-acquired freedom from irksome duties, he expresses himself most gratefully 
towards her. 

If we may trust the description of his house and garden in the Prologue to the 
Legend of Good Women, probably composed in the spring of 1385, it would appear 
that he was then living in the country, and had already given up his house over the 
city gate at Aldgate to Richard Forster, who obtained a formal lease of it from the Cor- 
poration of London in October, 1386. We learn incidentally, from a note to the 
Envoy to Scogan, 1. 45, that he was living at Greenwich at the time when he wrote that 
poem (probably in 1393). And it is highly probable that Chaucer's residence at Green- 
wich extended from 1385 to the end of 1399, when he took a new house at Westminster. 
This supposition agrees well with various hints that we obtain from other notices. 
Thus, in 1390, he was appointed (with five others) to superintend the repairing of the 
banks of the Thames between Woolwich and Greenwich. In the same year he was 
robbed at Hatcham (as we shall see below), which is near Deptford and Greenwich. 
And we find the singular reference in the Canterbury Tales (A 3907), where the Host 
suddenly exclaims — ' Lo ! Grenewich, ther many a shrewe is inne ' ; which looks like 
a sly insinuation, on the Host's part, that Greenwich at that time contained many 
' shrews ' or rascals. Few places would serve better than Greenwich for frequent obser- 
vation of Canterbury pilgrims. 

1386. In this year Chaucer was elected a knight of the shire for Kent, in the 
Parliament held at Westminster. In August, his patron John of Gaunt went to Spain ; 
and during his absence, his brother Thomas, duke of Gloucester, contrived to deprive 
the king of all power, by appointing a regency of eleven persons, himself being at 
the head of them. As the duke of Gloucester was ill disposed towards his brother 
John, it is probable that we can thus account for the fact that, in December of 
this year, Chaucer was dismissed from both his offices, of Comptroller of Wool and 
Comptroller of Petty Customs, others being appointed in his place. This sudden 
and great loss reduced the poet from comparative wealth to poverty; he was 
compelled to raise money upon his pensions, which were assigned to John Scalby on 
May I, 1388. 

In October of this year (1386), there was a famous trial between Richard Lord 
Scrope and Sir Thomas Grosvenor, during which Chaucer deposed that he was ' forty 
years of age and upwards, and had borne arms for twenty-seven years.' He was, in 
fact, about forty-six years old, having been born, as said above, about 1340. More- 
over, it is probable that he first bore arms in 1359, when he went with the invading 
army to France. This exactly tallies with his own statement. 

1387. In this year died Chaucer's wife, Philippa ; to this loss he alludes in his 
Envoy to Bukton. It must have been about this time that he was composing portions 
of his greatest poem, the Canterbury Tales. 

1389. On May 3, Richard II. suddenly took the government into his own hands. 
John of Gaunt returned to England soon afterwards, and effected an outward recon- 
ciliation between the king and the duke of Gloucester. The Lancastrian party was 



xii lEnttotiuction. 

now once more in power, and Chaucer was appointed Clerk of the King's Works at 
Westminster on July 12, at a salary of 2J. a day (more than i/. of our present money, 
at the least). 

1390. In this year, Chaucer was also appointed Clerk of the Works at St. 
George's Chapel at Windsor, and was put on a Commission to repair the banks 
of the Thames between Woolwich and Greenwich. In a writ, dated July i in this 
year, he was allowed the costs of putting up Scaffolds in Smithfield for the King 
and Queen to view the tournament which had taken place there in May. This 
helps to explain the minute account of the method of conducting a tournament 
which we meet with in the Knight's Tale. In the preceding month he had been 
appointed, by the Earl of March, joint Forester (with Richard Brittle) of North 
Petherton Park in Somerset. In September, he was twice robbed of some of the 
king's money; once, at Westminster, of 10/.; and again, near the ' foule ok' (foul 
oak) at Hatcham, Surrey, of 9/. y. 8d. ; but the repayment of these sums was forgiven 
him. 

1391. This is the date given by Chaucer to his prose Treatise on the Astrolabe, 
which he compiled for the use of his ' little son ' Lewis, of whom nothing more is 
known ; and it is supposed that he died at an early age. At this time, for some 
unknown reason, the poet unfortunately lost his appointment as Clerk of the Works. 

1394, In February of this year, Chaucer received a grant from the king of 20/. 
a year for life ; nevertheless, he seems to have been in want of money, as we find him 
making applications for the advancement of money from his pension. 

1398. In this year or the preceding, Chaucer was made sole Forester of North 
Petherton Park, instead of joint Forester, as in 1390. In the Easter Term, he was sued 
for a debt of 14/. is. iid. In October, the king granted him a tun of wine yearly, for 
his life-time. 

1399. On September 30, Henry IV. became king of England, and Chaucer ad- 
dressed to him a complaint regarding his poverty, called a ' Compleynt to his Purs," 
in response to which, only four days afterwards, Henry granted that the poet's pension 
of twenty marks (13/. 6s. 8d.) should be doubled, in addition to the 20/. a year which 
had been granted to him in 1394. 

On Christmas eve of this year, Chaucer took a long lease of a house in the garden 
of the Chapel of St. Mary, Westminster ; this house stood near the spot now occupied 
by King Henry the Seventh's Chapel. The lease is in the Muniment Room of West- 
minster Abbey (Historical MSS. Commission, i. 95). 

1400. The traditional date of Chaucer's death is October 25, 1400 ; in the second 
year of Henry IV. His death doubtless took place in his newly-acquired house at 
Westminster ; and he attained to the age of about sixty years. Of his family, 
nothing is known. His ' little son ' Lewis probably died young ; and there is no evi- 
dence earlier than the reign of Henry VI. that the Thomas Chaucer whose great- 
grandson, John de la Pole, Earl of Lincoln, was declared heir to the throne by his 
uncle, Richard III., in 1484, was Chaucer's son. As Thomas Chaucer was a man of 
great wealth, and of some mark, we should have expected to find early and undoubted 
evidence as to his parentage. We find, however, that Thomas Gascoigne, who wrote 
a Theological Dictionary, and died in 1458, refers to the poet in these words: — ' Fuit 
idem Chawserus pater Thomae Chawserus, armigeri, qui Thomas sepelitur in Nuhelm 
iuxta Oxoniam." Gascoigne was in a position to know the truth, since he was Chan- 
cellor of Oxford, and Thomas Chaucer had held the manor of Ewelme, at no 



^fjaracter o! €^f)aucer. xiii 

great distance, till his death in 1434. If this information be correct, it then 
becomes highly probable that Chaucer's wife Philippa was Philippa Roet, sister 
of the Katharine de Roet of Hainault, who married Sir John Swynford, and after- 
wards became the mistress, and in 1396 the third wife of John of Gaunt. This 
has been inferred from the fact that Thomas Chaucer's arms contain three wheels, 
supposed to represent the name of Roet ; since the Old French roet means ' a little 
wheel.' Those who accept this inference see good reasons for explaining the 
favours extended to Chaucer both by John of Gaunt himself and his son King 
Henry IV. 

CHARACTER OF CHAUCER. 

There is no space here for exhibiting fully the revelation of Chaucer's character 
as expressed by numerous passages in his works. We easily recognise in them 
a man of cheerful and genial nature, with great powers of originality, full of 
freshness and humour, a keen observer of men, and at the same time an en- 
thusiastic and untiring student of books. He tells a story excellently and sets his 
characters before us with dramatic clearness ; and he has also an exquisite ear for 
music and pays great attention to the melodious flow of his verse. Except in his 
prose tales, he frequently affects, in his Canterbury Tales, an air of simplicity 
which sits upon him gracefully enough. In his Prologue to Sir Thopas, he describes 
himself as a ' large,' i. e. a somewhat corpulent man, and no ' poppet ' to embrace, 
that is, not slender in the waist ; as having an ' elvish ' or abstracted look, often 
staring on the ground ' as if he would find a hare,' and ' doing no dalliance ' to any 
man, i. e. not entering briskly into casual conversation. His numerous references 
and quotations show that he was deeply read in all medieval learning, and well 
acquainted with Latin, French (both of England and of the continent), and Italian, 
besides being a master of the East-midland dialect of English. A passage in the 
Reves Tale imitates some of the peculiarities of the Northumbrian dialect with 
much fidelity. On the other hand, he occasionally introduces forms into his poems 
that are peculiarly Kentish ; owing, as I am inclined to suggest, to his residence 
for some years at Greenwich. In his Hous 0/ Fame,hQ tells us how he had ' set his 
wit to make books, songs, and ditties in rime,' and often ' made his head ache at 
night with writing in his study.' For, when he had done his official work for the 
day, and ' made his reckonings,' he used to go home and become wholly absorbed 
in his books, ' hearing neither this nor that ' ; and, ' in stead of rest and new 
things' (recreation), he used 'to sit at a book, as dumb as a stone, till his look was 
dased ' ; and thus did he ' live as a hermit, though (unlike a hermit) his abstinence 
was but little.' So great (as he tells us in the Prologue to The Legend of Good 
Women) was his love of nature, that, ' when the month of May is come, and I hear 
the birds sing, and see the flowers springing up, farewell then to my book and 
to my devotion ' to reading. In many passages he insists on the value of the 
purity of womanhood and the nobility of manhood, taking the latter to be de- 
pendent upon good feeling and courtesy. As he says in The Wife of Bath's Tale, 
' the man who is always the most virtuous, and most endeavours to be constant in the 
performance of gentle deeds, is to be taken to be the greatest gentleman. Christ 
desires that we should derive our gentleness from Him, and not from our ancestors, 
however rich.' 



3dv JIntrotiuctian, 



WRITINGS OF CHAUCER. 

Other notices of Chaucer must be gathered from his writings and from what we 
know about them. It is advisable to date his various works, where possible, as well as 
we can, and to consider the result. 

Chaucer's works fall (as shewn by Ten Brink) into three periods. During the 
first of these, he imitated French models, particularly the famous and very long poem 
entitled Le Roman de la Rose, of which, as he himself tells us, he made a translation. 
It so happens that there exist what are apparently two, but are really three frag- 
ments of translations of two different parts of this poem ; they are found in a 
MS. at Glasgow, written out about A.D. 1430-40, and in the early printed editions. 
These three fragments, marked A, B, C in the present volume, appear to be by 
different hands ; and only the first of them can be reconciled with Chaucer's usual 
diction and grammar. We must regretfully infer that the major part of Chaucer's 
own translation is irrecoverably lost. The poems of this First Period were written 
before he set out on his Itahan travels in 1372, and there is no trace in them of any 
Italian influence. 

The poems of the Second Period (1373-1384) clearly shew the influence of Italian 
literature, especially of Dante's Divina Commedia, and of Boccaccio's poems entitled 
11 Teseide and II Filostrato. Curiously enough, there is nothing to shew that 
Chaucer was acquainted, at first-hand, with Boccaccio's Decamerone. 

The poems of the Third Period are chiefly remarkable for a larger share of origi- 
nality, and are considered as beginning with the Legend of Good Women, the first 
poem in which the poet employed what is now known as the 'heroic' couplet, which 
he adapted from Guillaume de Machault. 

The following list is arranged, conjecturally, in chronological order. 

Origenes upon the Maudeleyne {lost). 

Book of the Leoun {lost). 

Ceys and Alcioun ; afterwards (probably) partly preserved in the Book of the 
Duchesse. 

The Romaunt of the Rose. (Fragment A (11. 1-1705) is all that can fairly be 
claimed as Chaucer's work. Fragment B is written in a dialect approximating to that 
of Lincolnshire. The author of Fragment C, like that of B, remains unknown.) 

A. B. C. — Minor Poems, I. 

1369. Book of the Duchesse. — M. P. III. 

Lyf of St. Cecyle (afterwards adapted to become the Second Nonnes Tale). 

Monkes Tale (parts of) ; lines 3365-3652 clearly belong to a later period. 

About 1372-3. Clerkes Tale ; except E 995-1008, and the Envoy. 

Palamonand Arcite ; of which some scraps are preserved in other poems. It was 
also used as the basis of the Knightes Tale. 

Compleint to his Lady. — M. P. VI. 

An Amorous Compleint, made at Windsor. — M. P. XXII. 

Womanly Noblesse.— M. P. XXIV. 

Compleint unto Pite. — M. P. II. 

Anelida and Arcite (containing ten stanzas from Palamon). — M. P. VII. 

The Tale of Melibeus (in its original form) ; partly translated from Albertano of 
Brescia. 

The Persones Tale (in its original form) ; partly translated from Fr6re Lorens. 



iStiiti0n0 of Cjjaiicer. xv 

Of the Wretched Engendring of Mankind; mentioned in the Legend, Text A, 
I. 414; and partly preserved in scraps occurring in the Man of Lawes Tale, B 99-121, 

421-7, 771-7, 925-931. 1135-41- 

Man of Lawes Tale (in its original form) ; partly translated from Nicholas Trivet. 

1377-81. Translation of Boethius. 

1379? Complaint of Mars. — M. P. IV. 

1379-83. Troilus and Criseyde ; (partly from Boccaccio's II Filostrato and Guido 
delle Colonne's Historia Troiae ; containing three stanzas from Palamon). 

Wordes to Adam (concerning Boethius and Troilus). — M. P. VIII. 

The Former Age; chiefly from Boethius, Book II. met. V. — M. P. IX. 

Fortune; containing hints from Boethius. — M. P. X. 

1382. Parlement of Foules (containing six stanzas from Palamon). — M. P. V. 

1383-4. House of Fame ; containing hints from Dante ; tmfinished. 

1385-6. Legend of Good Women ; unjinished. 

1386. Canterbury Tales begun. 

1387-8. Central period of the Canterbury Tales. 

1389, &c. The Tales continued. 

1391. Treatise on the Astrolabe ; chiefly from Messahala ; unjinished. 

1393? Compleint of Venus. — M, P. XVIII. 

1393. Lenvoy to Scogan. — M. P. XVI. 

1396. Lenvoy to Bukton. — M. P. XVII. 

1399. Envoy to Compleint to his Purse. — M. P. XIX. 

The following occasional triple roundel and balades may have been composed 
between 1380 and 1396 : — Merciless Beaute. — M. P. XI. Balade to Rosemounde. — 
M. P. XII. Against Women Unconstaunt. — M. P. XXI. Compleint to his Purse 
(except the Envoy). — M. P. XIX. Lak of Stedfastnesse. — M. P. XV. Gentilesse. — 
M. P. XIV. Truth. — M. P. XIII. Proverbes of Chaucer. — M. P. XX. 

EDITIONS OF CHAUCER. 

Several of Chaucer's Poems were printed at various times by Caxton and others, 
but the first collected edition of his works was that edited by W. Thynne in 1532. 
This was reprinted, with the addition of the spurious Ploivmau's Tale,'m 1542; and 
again, about 1550. Later editions appeared in 1561 (with large additions by John 
Stowe) ; in 1598 (re-edited by Thomas Speght), second edition, 1602, and reprinted in 
1687. Still later editions were the very bad one by Urry, in 1721, and the excellent one 
by Tyrwhitt, of the Canterbury Tales only, in 1775-8. These editions, excepting 
Tyrwhitt's, have done much to confuse the public as to the genuine works of Chaucer, 
because in them a large number of poems, some known (even by the editors) to be by 
Lydgate, Govver, Hoccleve, and Scogan, together with others obviously spurious, were 
carelessly added to works by Chaucer himself ; and many erroneous notions have 
been deduced from the study of this incongruous mixture. 

It must suffice to say here that most of the later editions, since the publication of 
Tyrwhitt's remarks on the subject, reject many of these additional pieces, but still 
unadvisedly admit the poems entitled The Cou?t of Love, The Complaint of the Black 
Knight, Chaucer s Dream, The Floiver and the Leaf, and The Cuckoo and the Nightin- 
gale. Of these. The Complaint of the Black Knight is now known to be by Lydgate ; 
The Flower and the Leaf cannot be earlier than 1450, and was probably written, as it 



xvi UntrotJuction. 

purports to be, by a lady ; whilst The Court of Love can hardly be earlier than 1500, 
and Chaucer's Dream (so called) is of still later date. Nothing but a complete igno- 
rance of the history of the English language can connect these fifteenth-century and 
sixteenth-century poems with Chaucer. The only poem, in the above set, which can 
possibly be as old as the fourteenth century, is The Cuckoo and the Nightingale. There 
is no evidence of any kind to connect it with Chaucer ; and Professor Lounsbury 
decisively rejects it, on the internal evidence. It admits a few rimes (see p. xxii) such 
as Chaucer nowhere employs. 



GRAMMATICAL HINTS. 

The following brief hints contain but a minimum of information, and include 
nothing that should not be extremely familiar to the student. 

Observe that, in Chaucer's English, the final syllables -e, -ed, -en, -es, almost always 
form a distinct and separate syllable, so that a large number of words had then a 
syllable more than they have now. Unless this rule be observed, no progress in the 
study is possible. In particular, always sound this final -e (like the a in China) at the 
end of a line. 

Final -e is elided, or slurred over, when the next word begins with a vowel, oris one 
of certain words beginning with //, viz. (i) a pronoun, as he ; (2) part of the verb 
have ; (3) the adverbs heer, how ; (4) mute h in honour, houre. In a similar position, 
final -er, -en, -el, -y are slurred over likewise ; thus^^/-if« is really ^^/';z in 1. 291I. 

Final -^ is sometimes dropped in a few common words, such as were, were, hadde, 
had, wolde, would. 

Middle -e- is also sometimes dropped, as in havenes, pronounced (haavnez), 1. 407. 
But trew-e-ly (481) is trisyllabic. 

Tlie reasons for sounding the final -e, -en, -es, as distinct syllables, are grammatical. 
These endings represent older inflexions, mostly Anglo-Saxon ; and were once, in 
fact, essential. But, in Chaucer's time, they were beginning to disappear, and many 
are now lost altogether. 

Final -e. The various sources of the M.E. (i. e. Middle-English) final -e are, 
chiefly, these following. 

1. The A.S. (Anglo-Saxon) sb. ended in a vowel. Thus A.S. har-a, a hare, became 
M.E. har-e (191). 

2. The A.F. (Anglo-French) sb. ended in a vowel which was formerly sounded. 
Thus A.F. melodl-e (four syllables) is M.E. melody-e (four syllables, 9). 

3. The dative case often ends in -e, especially after the prepositions at, by, for, in, of, 
on, to. Thus rot-e (2) is the dative case of root, a root. We even find the form of an 
oblique case used as a nom. case, owing to confusion. Thus A.S. hwelp, a whelp, 
makes the dat. hwelp-e ; Chaucer has whelp-e as a nominative (257). 

4. The forms hell-e (so in A.S.) , sonn-e (A.S. sunn-an) are genitives ; see Book Duch. 
171 ; A 1051. Similarly -y represents a genitive suffix in lad-y, 88, 695. 

5. The definite form of the adjective (i. e. the form used when the def. art. the or a 
possessive or demonstrative pronoun precedes it) ends in -e. Ex. : the yong-e, 7. 

6. The adj. pi. ends in -e ; as smal-e, 9. 

1 The numbers refer to the lines of The Prologue to the Canterbury Tales; see p. 419. 



(Grammatical Joints. xvii 

7. Even the adj. sing, may end in -e ; as sioet-e (5), from A.S. swete, sweet, in which 
the final -e is essentia]. So also trewe, from A.S. treowe ; 531. 

8. Verbs : the infinitive and gerund (with to) end in -en or -e ; as bigitin-e, 42 ; for 
to rys-e, 33. 

9. Strong verbs : the pp. (past participle) ends in -en or -e ; as y-ronn-e, 8. 

10. Weak verbs: the pt. t. (past tense) ends in -ede, -de, -te,-e ; as say-de,'jo. Some- 
times in -ed, a.s prov-ed, 547. Observe lakk-e-de, 756; lov'de, 97; wei-te, 129; went-e,^^. 

11. Verbs: various other inflexions in -en or -^. Thus slep-en, 3 p. pr. pi., 10; 
wer-en, i p. pt. pi., 29; gess-e, i p. pr. s., 82; smert-e, 3 p. pr. s. subj., 230, &c. 

12. Adverbs and prepositions may end in -en or -e ; as abov-en, 53 ; about-e, prep. 
158, adv. 488. 

Final -en. The suffix -en usually denotes either (i) the pi. sb., as hos-en, 456; 
(2) the infin. or gerundial infin. of a verb, as to wend-en, 21 ; (3) the pp. of a strong 
verb, as holp-en, 18 ; (4) the pi. of any tense of a verb, as wer-en, i p. pt. p]., 29; (5) 
a prep, or adverb, as abov-en, 53. 

Final -es. The final -es denotes either (i) the gen. sing., as lord-es, 47; (2) the 
pi. sb., as shour-es, 1 ; or (3) an adverb, as thry-es, 562. But the gen. of lady is lady ; 
and oi fader \% fader. And the plural may end in -s, as in. palmers, 13. 

The student should endeavour to make out, in every case, the reason for the use of 
final -e, -en, or -es. He will thus acquire the grammar. The above hints explain most 
cases that can arise. 

Further notes. Some neuter sbs. do not change in the plural, as hors, pi. 
hors, 74. So also neet, sheep, swyn, yeer. 

Comparatives end in -er, as grett-er, adj., 197; or -re, as fer-re, adv., 48. Super- 
latives, in -est, occasional def. form -est-e, as best-e, 252, Pronouns : tho, those ; this, 
pi. thise, these; thilke, that; like, same, Atte, for at the. Ye, nom. ; yow, dat. and 
ace, you. Hir, their (also her); hem, them. His, his, its. Whiche, what sort of, 40; 
what, i. e. 'why,' 184; That . . . he, who, 44, 45; luho so, whoever, 741. Afen, one, 
with a sing, verb, as men smoot, one smote, 149. 

Verbs. Verbs are distinguished as being weak or strong. In the former, the pp. 
ends in -ed, -d, or -// in the latter, in -en, or -e. 

A simple rule is this. In weak verbs, the pt. t. ends in -ede (rarely -ed), -de, -te, -e,. 
so that the final -e is here extremely common, but it does not appear in the pp. ; 
conversely, in strong verbs, it is the pp. that ends in -en or -<?, which never appears in 
the first or third person singular of the past tense. Ex. went-e, 3 p. pt. s., 78, is 
a weak past tense; cla-d, 103, is a weak pp. Conversely, y-ronn-e, 8, is a strong pp.; 
sleep, 98, is a strong pt. t. The prefix y- (A.S. ge-) can be prefixed to any pp., and 
makes no difference. 

Strong verbs usually shew vowel-change; thus bigan (44) is the pt. t. of biginneu. 
But note that this is not a sure guide; for raugh-te (136) is the pt. t. of rech-en, to 
reach, and is weak. Slep-en, to sleep, pt. t. sleep, is strong. 

In strong verbs, the vowel of the past tense is changed, sometimes, in the plural. 
Thus the pt. t. sing, of ryd-en, to ride, is rood, 169; but the pi. is rtd-en, 825. The pp. 
is also rtd-en, 48. 

The usual formulae for the conjugation of verbs are as follows. 

Present tense. Sing, -e, -est, -eth {-th) ; pi. -en or .-<?. 

Past tense ; weak verbs. Sing, -ede {-de or -ed) , -de, -te, -e (in persons i and 3) ; 
-edest, -dest, -test, -est (2 person). Plural, -eden, -ede, -de, -den, -ten, -te,-e (all persons). 

b 



xviii jintrotiuctian. 

Past tense ; strong verbs. Sing, indie, no suffix (in persons i and 3) ; -<?, occa- 
sionally (2 person). Sing. subj. -e (all persons). Plural of both moods: -<?«, -e. 

Imperative. Sing. 2 person; no suffix (usually); -e (in some weak verbs). 
Plural, 2 person: -eth, -th ; (sometimes-^). 

Infinitive : -en, -e. The gerundial infinitive has to or for to prefixed, and often 
denotes purpose. 

Participles. Present : -ing, often -inge at the end of a line. Pp. of weak verbs : 
-ed, -d, -t. Pp. of strong verbs : -en, -e. 

N.B. We find the contracted form bit, for biddeth, in the 3 p. pr. s. indicative, 187. 

Similar contractions are common ; hence hit means ' hideth ' ; rit means ' rideth ' ; 
sit, ' sitteth ' ; /et, ' leadeth,' B 1496 ; &c. 

Formation of Past Tenses. The form of the pt. t. of a weak verb depends on 
the form of its stem. There are three classes of such verbs. 

1. Infin. -ten; pt. -ede {-de), or -ed. Thus lov-ien, to love ; pt. t. lov-ede {pronoimced 
luv'da), or lov-ed (luved). Compare lakk-e-de, 756; though the infin. is lakk-en. 

2. Infin. -en; pt. t. -de, -te, or sometimes (after d or t) -e ; without vowel-change, 
except such as is due to contraction. Ex. her-en, to hear, pt. t. her-de ; k'ep-en, to 
keep, pt. t. kep-te ; led-en, to lead, pt. t. lad-de (short for leed-de). Cf. went-e, went. 

3. Infin. -en, with a modified vowel in the infinitive, the root-vowel appearing in 
the pt. t. and pp. Thus the root SOK (cf. Gothic sokjan, to seek) appears in the 
A.S. pt. t. soh-te, pp. soh-t, M.E. soght-e, sogh-t ; but the o becomes e (as in A.'S.fot, 
foot, pi. /^/, feet) in the infin. sec-an, M.E. sek-en, E. seek. Cf. tell-en, pt. t, tol-de ; 
tcch-eti, pt. t. taugh-te. 

N.B. The pp. of a weak verb results from the pt. t. by dropping -e (unless it has 
been dropped already) ; thus pt. t. tol-de gives pp. tol-d. 

Strong- verbs. The seven conjugations of strong verbs are given in my Princi- 
ples of Etymology. I take as representative verbs the following : fall, shake, bear, give, 
drink, drive, choose. A more usual order (though it makes no real difference) is 
I. drive, 2. choose, 3. drink, 4. bear, $t give, 6. shake, 7. fall. 

The ' principal parts ' are : (a) the infinitive ; (b) the past tense, singular ; (c) the 
pt. t. pi. ; (d) the pp. 

1. 'Drive.' Here Chaucer has: (a) ryd-en, to ride; (b) rood; (c) rtd-en ; (d) 
rtd-en. So also byt-en, bite, rys-en, rise, shyn-en, shine, shryv-en, shrive, smyt-en, smite, 
imyt-en, write 1. I here write y to denote long i. 

2. 'Choose.' As: (a) seth-en, to seethe; (b) seeth ; (c, d) sod-en. 

3. 'Drink.' As: (a) biginn-en ; (b) bigan ; (c) bigonnen ; (d) bigotinen. So also 
druiken, ginnen, rlntten, to run, singen, sprmgen, swinken, to toil, winnen, delven, 
fight en (pt. t. s. faught) , helpen, kerven, thresshen. 

4. ' Bear.' As: (a) ber-en ; (b) bar ; (c) ber-en ; (d) bor-en. So a.\so breken, sheren, 
stelen. Coinen has : (b) com ; (c) com-en ; (d) coin-en. 

5. 'Give.' As: {a) yev-en,yiv-en ; {h) yaf ; (c) yev-en ; (d) yiv-en. So ci\so geten 
(pp.geten); speken {pp. spoken). 

6. ' Shake.' As : (a) bak-en ; (b) book ; (c) bok-en ; (d) bak-en. So also drawen, 
shaken, shaven, stonden (pt. t. stood), taken, sweren (pp. swor-e). 

7. 'Fall.' As: {■&) fall-en ; {h) fil ; {o) fill-en ; {A) fall-en. So holden , p\. \, held ; 

1 Chaucer's Prologue does not contain specimens of all the parts of the verbs mentioned. 
Thus sethen only occurs in the infinitive (383) ; however, the pi. t. seeth occurs elsesvhere, viz. in 
the Clerkes Tale, E 227. 



liletre. xix 

let-en, pt. t. leet ; slep-e», pt. t. sleep; blowen,growen, know-ett, pt. t. bleiv, &c. ; 7vep-en, 
pt. t. weep ; goon, pp. y-goon, y-go, 286. Compare the complete list of strong M.E, 
verbs, in Specimens of English, ed. Morris and Skeat, pt. i. 

Anomalous Verbs. Among these note the following. Been, ben, axe. Imper. 
pi. beeth, bet/i, be ye. Pp. been, ben, been. 

Can, I know; pi. connen ; pt. t. coudc, knew, could: pp. couth, known. Dar, 
I dare; pt. t. dorste. May, I may; pi. mowen ; subjunctive, mowe, pi. mowen. Moot, 
I must, I may, he must, he may ; pi, moten, mote ; pt. t. 7ndste. Oghte, ought. Shal, 
pi. shullen, shul ; pt. t. sholde. Wlten, to know; ivoot, wot, I know, he knows ; pi. 
wlten (correctly; but Chaucer also \\<\.'~> ye tvoot); pt. t. 7t»/.f/^, knew ; pp. wist. Wil, 
wol, wole, will; pi. wolen, wilen ; pt. t. wolde. Thar, needs; pt. t. thurte. 

Negatives. Nan, for ne am, am not; nis, for ne is, is not; nas, was not; nere, 
were not ; nadde, had not ; nil, will not ; nolde, would not ; noot, I know not, he 
knows not; niste, knew not; ne . . . ne, neither . . . nor, 603. Double negatives^ 
70, 71, &c. 

Adverbs. End in -e, as dep-e, deeply ; or -ly, as subtil-ly ; or -e-ly, as trew-e-ly, 
truly ; or -^«, -<f, as bifor-e?i, bifor-e ; or va-es, as thry-es, thrice. J>^(?/-, where, 547; 
ther as, where that, 34. 

Prepositions. End in -en, -e, -es ; Sec. Til, for to, before a vowel. With adjoins 
its verb ; 791. 

METRE. 

Chaucer was our first great metrist, and enriched our literature with several 
forms of metre which had not been previously employed in English, These he 
borrowed chiefly from Guillaume de Machault, who made use of stanzas of seven, 
eight, and nine lines, and even wrote at least one Compleint in the 'heroic' 
couplet. 

The metre of four accents, in rimed couplets, had been in use in English long 
before Chaucer's time ; and he adopted it in translating Le Roman de la Rose (the 
original being in the same metre), in the Book of the Duchesse, and in the House of 
Fame. 

The ballad-metre, as employed in the Tale of Sir Thopas, is also older than his 
time. In fact, this Tale is a burlesque imitation of some of the old Romances. 

The four-line stanza, in the Proverbes, was likewise nothing new. 

But he employed the following metres, in English, for the first time. 

1, The 8-line stanza, with the rimes arranged in the order ababbcbc ; i. e. with the 
first line (a) riming with the third (a), and so on. Exx, A.B.C. ; The Monkes Tale; 
The Former Age ; Lenvoy to Bukton. 

xb. The same, thrice repeated, with a refrain. Ex. (part of) Fortune; Compleint 
to Venus ; Balade to Rosemounde, 

2, The 7-line stanza, with the rimes ababbcc ; a favourite metre. Exx. Lyf of 
Seint Cecyle ; Clerkes Tale ; Palamon and Arcite ; (part of) Compleint to his Lady ; 
An Amorous Compleint ; Compleint to Pit^ ; (part of) Anelida ; The Wretched 
Engendring of Mankind ; The Man of LavvesTale ; (part of) The Compleint of Mars ; 
Troilus and Criseyde ; Wordes to Adam ; (part of) The Parlement of Foules ; (parts 
of) The Canterbury Tales ; Lenvoy to Scogan. 

2 b. The same 7-line stanza, thrice repeated, with a refrain. Exx. Against Women 

b2 



XX ]xntrotiurti0n. 

Unconstaunt; Compleint to his Purse; Lak of Stedfastnesse ; Gentilesse; Truth. Also 
in the Legend of Good Women, 249-269. 

2 c. The 7-line stanza, with the rimes ababbab. Ex. (part of) Fortune. 

3. Terza Rima. Only a few lines ; in the Compleint to his Lady. 

4. The lo-line stanza, aabaabcddc. In the Compleint to his Lady. 

5. The 9-line stanza, aabaabbab. Only in Anelida. 

5 b. The same, with internal rimes. Only in Anelida. 

5 c. The same as 5, but thrice repeated. Only in Womanly Noblesse. 

6. Two stanzas of 16 lines each; with the rimes aaabaaab • bbbabbba. Only in 
Anelida. 

7. The 9-line stanza, aabaabbcc. Only in the latter part of the Compleint of Mars. 

8. The roundel. In the Parlement of Foules ; and Merciless Beautd. 

9. The heroic couplet. In the Legend of Good Women and parts of the Canter- 
bury Tales. 

10. A 6-line stanza, repeated six times ; with the rimes ababcb. Only in the Envoy 
to the Clerkes Tale. 

11. A lo-line stanza, aabaahbaab. Only in the Envoy to the Compleint of Venus, 

12. A 6-hne stanza, ababaa. Only in the Envoy to Womanly Noblesse. 

13. A 5-line stanza, aabba. Only in the Envoy to Compleint to his Purse. 

The following pieces are in prose. The Tale of Melibeus. The Persones Tale. 
The translation of Boethius, De Consolatione Philosophiae. The Treatise on the 
Astrolabe. 

VERSIFICATION. 

Some lines drop the first syllable, and the first foot contains one syllable only; 
as : Ging | len in, &c. 170. 

Many rimes are double, as cloistre, oistre, i8i ; Rom-e, to me, 671 ; non-es, noon is, 523. 
Always sound final -e at the end of a line. Rimes may be treble, as apothec-dr-i-es, 
letu-dr-i-es, 425 ; so at 11. 207, 513, 709. Compare the Grammatical Hints. 

Caesura. The caesura, or middle pause, allows extra syllables to be preserved, 
Tiius, at 1. 293, we have : — 

For him was lever — hav' at his beddes h6ed. 

The pause gives time for the -er, of lev-er. Similarly, we may preserve the -er of 
dellv-er, 84; -e in mor-e, 98 ; -e in curteisy-e, 132; -ie { = y) in car-ie, 130. 
Compare also : — 

With-6ut-e bak-e met-e — was nev'r his hous ; 343. 
Th4t I no drop-e — ne fill' upon hir brest ; 131. 

The syllables -er, -en, -el, -ed, before a vowel, or h (in he, &c.), are light, and do not 
always count in scansion ; see 11. 84, 291, 296, 334, &c. Cf. ma \ ny a breem \ ; 350, 
Read the lines deliberately, and remember the old pronunciation. 

Accent. Variable, in some words ; cf. miller, 545, with the archaic trisyllabic 
mil-ler-e, 541. Also, in French words, we have honour, 582 ; but the archaic honour, 
46. Cf. licour, 3 ; vertu, 4. 

PRONUNCIATION. 

The M.E. pronunciation was widely different from the present, especially in the 
vowel-sounds. The sounds of the vowels were nearly as in French and Italian. 



^r0nimriation. xxi 

They can be denoted by phonetic invariable symbols, enclosed within marks of 
parenthesis. Convenient phonetic symbols are these following. 

Vowels, (aa), as a in father; (a) short, as a in aha! (ae), open long e, as a in 
Mary; (e), open short e, as e in b^d ; (ee), close long e, as e in v^il ; (i) short, as F. i 
in Imi, or (nearly) as E. i in /n ; (ii), as ee in d.?<fp ; (ao), open long o, as aw in saw; 
(o) open short o, as o in not; (oo), close long c, as o in n(?te, or o in German ' so' \ 
^u), as « in iuW ; (uu), as oo in fi9ol ; (ii), as F. u in F. ' ec« ' ; (ii*), as long G. ii in G. 
'gr«n.' Also (a), as final a in China. 

Diphthong's, (ai), as 7 in fly; (au), as i^win n(37t/; (ei) , as ^Hn v«l ; (oi),asc?/in 
b<7/i. 

Consonants (special), (k), as ^ in rat; (s), as c in c\\y\ (ch), as in c/mxcli; 
(tch), as in ca-tc/i; (th), as ^/4 in /-^in ; (dh), as th in /"/ien. Also (h), when not initial, 
to denote a guttural sound, like G. ch in Nar/^t, UichX, but weaker, and varying with 
the preceding vowel. 

An accent is denoted by (•), as in M.E. name (naa'ma). 

By help of these symbols, it is possible to explain the meaning of the M.E. symbols 
employed by the scribes in Chaucer's Tales. The following is a list of the sounds 
they denote. The letters in thick type are the letters actually employed ; the letters 
within parenthesis denote the sounds, as above. 

Observe that long ' p,' also written ' 6,' means the same as (ao) ; and long ' ^' also 
written ' d,' means the same as (ae). 

a short, (a). Ex. al (al) ; as (az). N.B. The modern a in cat (koet) is denoted by 
(ae), and does not occur in Chaucer. 

a long, (aa). (i) at the end of a syllable; as age (aa'ja) ; (2) before s or ce ; as 
cas {VslSlS,) , face (faa'sa). 

ai, ay (ei), originally perhaps (ai) ; but ai and ei, both being pronounced as (ei), 
had already been confused, and invariably rime together in Chaucer. Cf. ^.gay, 
prey. 

au, aw (au). Ex. avaunt (avau'nt) ; awe (au's). 

C, as (k), except before e and /'; as (s), before e and /. 

ch (ch) ; CCh (tch), 

e short, (e). Ex.y9^M<?r^j (fedh'rez) ; middle <f dropped. 

e final, (a) ; and often dropped or elided or very lightly touched. 

e long and open, (ae). Sometimes denoted by 'p' or ' e^.' Ex. dene (klae'na). 

e long and close, (ee). Ex. swete (svvee'ta) ; weep (weep). 

ei, ey (ei). Ex. streit (streit) ; wey (wei). 

gr hard, i. e, (g) , except before e and i ; (j) , before e and i. Ex. go (gao) ; age (aa "ja) . 

gh (h),G. ch. Ex. light (liiht). The vowel was at first short, then half-long (as 
probably in Chaucer), then wholly long, when the (h) dropped out. Later, (ii) became 
(ei) and is now (ai). 

gn (n), with long preceding vowel; as digne (dii'ns). 

i short, (i). As F. i in iini\ but often as E. i in in ; the latter is near enough. So 
also y, when short, as in many (man'i). 

i, y long, (ii), Ex. / (ii) ; melodye (mel'odii's). 

ie (ee) , the same as ee. Ex. mischief (mischeef). 

I consonantal, (j). Ex. lay (jei) ; luge (jii'ja). So in the MSS. ; but here printed 
' j.,' as in ya^* (jei). 

le, often vocalic (1), as in E. temple (tenip'l). But note stables (staa'blez). 



xxii Kntrotiuctixjn. 

ng" (ngg); always as in E. //>/f^r. Ex. ^/i/>/^ (thingg). 

o short, (o), as in of (ov). But as (pu) before ^/^. And note particularly, that it is 
always (u), i.e. as «in iuW, wherever it has a sound like u in mod. E., as in company, 
son, monk, cousin, &c. Ex. sonne (sun-na), monk (mungk), vioche (muchs). 

O long and open, (ao). Sometimes denoted by 'p' or 'pp.' Ex. go (gao) ; stoon 
(staon). 

O long and close, (oo). Ex. sote (soo'ta) ; hood (hood). 

oi, oy (oi). 

ou, 0"W (uu) ; as mfiour (fluur) ; now (nuu). Rarely (pu), as in soule (souls). 

Og-h (puh), with open <?, as in E. not, followed by short (u). 

OUgh (uuh) ; with uu as in Y../00I (fuul) ; or as og-h. 

r is always strongly trilled, ssh (shsh), as \n fresshe (fresh'sha). 

u short, (ii) ; French; as \njust (jiist). Rarely (u), as in cut (kut) ; English. 

U long, (ii*), as in nature (natii'rs) ; French. 

"we final, (w9),but often merely (u). Ex. arwes (arwez) ; bowe (baou"9, bou'o) ; 
morive (moru) ; so blew (blee'u). 

N.B. Open long e (ae) often arises from A.S. ^, ea, or lengthening of e. Ex. were 
(waera) , A.S. w'a^ron ; eek (aek) , A.S. eac ; speken (spaekan), A.S. sprecan. Open longi? 
(ao) often arises from A.S. a, or lengthening of 0. Kx./o (fao), A.S. /a; open, A.S. 
open. Chaucer refrains from riming open long e (ae), when arising from A.S. ea, or 
lengthening of e, with the close e arising from A.S. e or eo. But there is some uncer- 
tainty about the quality of the e arising from A.S. ^, or from mutation. 

The occurrence of rimes such as Chaucer never employs furnishes an easy test for 
poems which have been supposed to be his on insufficient grounds. Thus, in The 
Cuckoo and the Nightingale, stanza 13, ^r^<?// rimes \i\\\\been; whereas the form green 
never occurs in Chaucer, who always employs gren-e (gree'ns) as a dissyllable, in 
accordance with its etymology from A.S. ^r^//^. In the same poem, upo?t rimes with 
?non, a man (stanza 17) ; but Chaucer knows nothing of such a form as nion. 

Non-Chaucerian rimes occur in large numbers in Fragment B of the Romaunt of 
the Rose. 



ERRATA. 

P. 135. col. 2. 1. 206 ; for coniuracion read conjuracion. 
P. 215. 1. 684. Delete the comma at the end of the line. 
P. 216. 1. 766. Alter the note of interrogation to a comma. 
P. 226. 1. 358. Delete the comma at the end of the line. 
P. 290. 1. 1171 ; for wrong, and seyde r<?a(a?wronge, and seyd. 
P. 592. 1. 2076 ; for But if read But-if. 



GLOSSARIAL INDEX. 



The references in this Index are given according to the following scheme. 

Poems denoted by Arabic numerals are Minor Poems. Thus, under 'Abaved,' the 
reference ' 3. 614 ' means Minor Poem no. 3, line 614, or 1. 614 of the Book of the 
Duchesse. The letter ' R.' refers to the Romaunt of the Rose, Fragment A, in pp. 1-18 ; 
the rest of the Poem, not being Chaucer's, is indexed separately. Thus ' R. 163' means 
1. 163 of the Romaunt. 

The five books of Boethius are denoted by B i, B 2, B 3, B 4, B 5, respectively ; and 
the ' prose ' and ' metrical ' sections are denoted by ' p ' and ' m." Thus, under ' Abais- 
sen,' the reference ' B 4. p 7. 81 ' means ' Boethius, bk. iv. prose 7, line 81.' The five 
books of Troilus are denoted by T. i., T. ii., T. iii., T. iv., and T. v. Thus ' T. iii. 1233' 
means ' Troilus, bk. iii., line 1233.' 

The House of Fame and the Legend of Good Women are denoted by ' HF.' and 
' L." respectively. If, in the latter case, the italic letter ' a ' follows the number of the 
line, the reference is to the earlier (or A-text) of the Prologue to the Legend. Thus 
' HF. 865 ' means ' House of Fame, line 865.' Again, ' L, 2075 ' means ' Legend of Good 
Women, line 2075 ; ' and ' L. 200 a' means ' Legend, &c., fine 200 of the text in the left- 
hand column.' 

The Prologue and the two books of the Treatise on the Astrolabe are denoted, 
respectively, by ' A. pr.,' ' A. i,,' and ' A. ii.' Thus the reference ' A. ii. 10. 8 ' means 
'.Astrolabe, bk. ii. ^^ 10, line 8 ; ' and ' A. pr. 10 ' means ' Astrolabe, prologue, line 10.' 

References to the Canterbury Tales are known by the use of the letters A, B, C, D, 
E, F, G, H, and I, which are used to denote the various Groups into which the Tales 
are divided. In this case, ' A ' is never followed by a full stop or by Roman numerals, 
as when the 'Astrolabe' is referred to; and such a reference as 'B 5,' meaning 
line 5 of Group B, is quite distinct from ' B 5. p i. i,' where ' B 5 ' means bk. v. 
of Boethius, and is invariably accompanied by the ' p ' or ' m ' denoting the ' prose ' or 
' metre.' 

Summary of the Minor Poems. The Minor Poems are all numbered, viz. i (ABC.) ; 
2 (Compleynte unto Pite) ; 3 (Book of the Duchesse) ; 4 (Mars) ; 5 (Parlement of 
Foules) ; 6 (Compleint to his Lady) ; 7 (Anelida) ; 8 (Wordes to Adam) ; 9 (Former 
Age) ; 10 (Fortune) ; 11 (Merciless Beauty) ; 12 (To Rosemounde) ; 13 (Truth) ; 14 (Gen- 
tilesse) ; 15 (Lak of Stedfastnesse) ; 16 (Envoy to Scogan) ; 17 (Envoy to Bukton) ; 
18 (Venus) ; 19 (To his Purse) ; 20 (Proverbs) ; 21 (Against Women Unconstant) ; 
22 (Amorous Complaint) ; 23 (Balade of Compleynt) ; 24 (Womanly Noblesse). 

Alphabetically, the references are to A (Group A of Cant. Tales) ; A. (Astrolabe) ; 
B (Group B of C. T.) ; B I . . . B 5 (Boethius, books i to 5) ; C, D, E, F, G, H, I 
(Groups C to I of C. T.) ; HF. (House of Fame) ; L. (Legend of Good Women) ; 
R. (Romaunt of the Rose) ; T. i. . . . T. v (Troilus, books i to 5). The Minor Poems, 
numbered i to 24, are given above. 

N.B. Words containing ay, ey, oy, aw, ew, ow, are sometimes entered as if spelt with 
at, ei, oi, an, eu, oro, respectively. 

Bb 



(glogsarial JIntiei. 



Abbreviations. Besides s., adj., and adv., for substantive, adjective, adverb, the fol- 
lowing are used in a special sense: — v., a verb in the infinitive mood; ger., gerund; 
pr, s., present tense, 3rd person singular ; pr. pi., present tense, 3rd person plural. 
Other persons are denoted by the figures i or 2. 

Fragments B and C of the ' Romaunt' are glossed in a separate Index. 



A, the first letter of the alphabet, T. i. 171 ; 
the letter A, A 161. 

A, indef. art. a, A 24, &c. ; al a, the whole 
of a, E 1 165; one, D 1396; one and the 
same, 21. 5; about, some, L. 2075. 

A., prep, on, on (the), in, for; A-nighte, by 
night, B3758; A-dayes, a-days, E 1164; 
A-morwe, on the morrow, A 822; A 
three, in three, A 2934; A goddes half, 
'on God's side,' in God's name, D 50; 
A goddes name, in God's name, A 854. 

A ! int. ah ! 3. 213. 

A ! ha! interj. aha! T. i. 868. 

Abaissen, ger. to be dismayed, B 4. p 7. 
81; pp. amazed, spell-bound, abashed, 
cast down, disconcerted, E317, 1108. 

Abak, adv. backwards, A 3736; aback, 
back, L. 864. 

Abak-ward, adv. backward, B 3. m 12. 66. 

Abandoune, v. devote, I 713 ; pr. s. aban- 
dons, B 2767. 

Abasshen, v. fear, be abashed, R. 1552; 
pp. abashed, confused, confounded, dis- 
concerted, 5. 447 ; R. 805, &c. 

Abate, v. lower, put down, B 3780; de- 
preciate, R. 286 ; 2 pr. s. subj. subtract, 
A. ii. 10. 8; pp. enfeebled, B 3. p 5. 52; 
put down, I 191. 

Abaved,//. confounded, disconcerted, 3. 
614. 

Abayst ; see Abaissen. 

Abe, alphabet, A. i. 11. 3. 

A-bedde, in bed, T. i. 915. 

Abegge, v. pay for it, A 3938. A Kentish 
fcirm. See Abeye, Abye. 

A-begged, a-begging, F 1580. 

Abet, s. abetting, aid, T. ii. 357. 

Abeye, v. pay for, C 100. See Abye. 

Abiden, Abit ; see Abyde. 

Abite, s. habit, dress, L. 146 a. 

A-blakeberied ; see Blakeberied. 

Able, adj. capable, 3. 786; fit, suitable, 
adapted, A 167; fit, L. 320; fit for, 3. 
779; deemed deserving, i. 184; fitting, 
R. 986. 

Ablinge, pr. pt. enabling, lifting, B 3. m 
9. 37 ; fitting, B I. m 6. 19. 

Abodes, pi. ^/Abood, s. 

Abog-hte, Aboght; see Abye. 

Abood, s. delay, A 965 ; tarrying, T. v. 



1307; abiding, continuance, HF. 1963; 

pi. delays, T. iii. 854. 
Abood, pt. s. of Abyde. 
Aboute, prep, about, round, throughout, 

round about, near. 
Aboute, adv. about, engaged in, T. v. 

1645; in due order, in turn, A 890; 

around, here and there ; been a., go 

about, endeavour, A 1142. 
Aboven, prep, above. 
A'bvegge,ger. to abridge, shorten, T. iii. 

262 ; A. with thy peynes, to shorten thy 

pains with, T, iv. 426. 
Abregginge, s. abridging, B 5. p i. 57 ; 

diminishing, I 568. 
A-breyde, v. awake, T. iii. 11 13; come to 

my senses, HF. 559; Abrayd, pt.s. (strong 

form), woke up, started up, 3. 192; 

Abreyd, 1 pt. s. started from sleep, HF. 

no; Abra.yde, pt. s. (weak/orm), started, 

B 4198 ; Abreyde, awoke, T. i. 724. 
Abroche, v. broach, D 177. 
Abs6nte, 2 pr. pi. subj. absent yourself, 

I- 43; 

Abusioun, s. abuse, absurdity, T. iv. 990 ; 
deceit, B 214; a shameful thing, scandal, 
T. iv. 1060. 

Abyden, v. abide, await, i. 131 ; wait for, 
HF. 1086; be still, withdraw, F 1522; 
pr. s. awaito, B 2175; dwells, T. ii. 987; 
Abit, />r. J. waits for, T. i. 109 1 ; abides, 
G 1175; imp. s. stay, wait, A 3129; imp. 
pi. B 1 175; pres.pt. E 757; Abood,//. s. 
awaited, T. iv. 156; stopped, HF. 1062; 
expected, 3. 247 ; Abiden,//. pi. abode, T. 
i. 474; Abiden,//. waited, B 3. p 9. 191. 

Abydinge, s. expectation, B 2. p 3. 66. 

Abye, v. pay for, A 4393 ; pr. pi. undergo, 
B 4. p 4. 86; Aboughte, //. s. paid for, 
T. v. 1756 ; suffered for, A 2303 ; Aboght, 
pp. paid for, L. 2483 ; purchased, 18. 37 ; 
bought dearly, L. 1387 ; atoned for, A 
3100. See Abeg-ge, Abeye. 

A-caterwawed, a-caterwauling, D 354. 

Acc6sse, s. feverish attack, T. ii. 1315. 

Accident, s. that which is accidental. T. 
iv. 1505 ; incident, T. iii. 918 ; accidental 
occurrence, HF. 1976; unusual appear- 
ance, E 607 ; outward appearance (see 
note), C 539. 

Accidie, s. sloth, I 388. 

Accioun, s. action, i. e. accusation, i. 20. 



(glossaiial hxtitx. 



Accomplice, v. accomplish, A 2864. 
Accord, s. agreement, B 2988 ; harmony, 

B 4069 ; peace, I 992. See Acord. 
Accordaunce, s. concord, harmony, R. 

496. 
Accordaunt, adj. suitable, B 4026. 
Accorde, v. agree ; />/: s. beseems, L. 2583. 

See Acorde. 
Accuseth,//-. s. reveals, R. 1591. 
Accusement, s. accusation (of her) , T. iv. 

556. 
Accusour, s. revealer, T. iii. 1450. 
Achdt, J-. buying, purchase, A 571. 
Achdtours, //. buyers, caterers, A 568. 
Ache, s. ache, T. iv. 728. 
A-chekked, pp. checked, hindered, HF, 

2093. 
Acheve, v. achieve, L. 1614. 
Achoken, v. choke, stifle ; pp. L. 2008. 
Acloyeth,/r. s. overburdens, 5. 517. 
A-Compas, adv. in a circle, L. 300. 
Acomplisshe, pr. s. subj. fulfil, compre- 
hend, B 3. p 10. 179. 
Acord, s. agreement, 5. 371 ; concord, 5. 

381, 668 ; accord, 3. 316 ; in a., in tune, 5. 

197 ; a/ of oon a., in tune, 3. 305. See 

Accord. 
Acordable, adj. harmonious, B 2. m 8. 23. 
Acordaunce, s. concord, B 2. m 8. 14. 
Acordaunt, adj. suitable, A 37, 3363 ; A. 

to, in harmony with, 5. 203. 
Acorde, v. accord, grant, allow, agree, 

concern; pt. s. suited, A 244; pf. pi. 

agreed, L. 168; pres. part, agreeing, B 

1737 ; pp. agreed, A 818. 
Acorse, \pr. s. curse, T. iv. 839. 
Acounte, v. consider, B 3591 ; pt. s. valued, 

cared, 3. 1237; 2/A s. didst reckon, B 2. 

P 5- 113- 
Acountinge, s. reckoning, calculation, 
Acoyede, pt. s. caressed, B 2. p 3. 73. 
Acquitance, s. release, A 4411 ; deed of 

release, A 3327. 
Acquyte, v. acquit, D 1599. 
Acurse, v. curse, T. iii. 1072. 
Acused, pt. s. blamed, T. ii. 1081. 
Acustomaunce, s. system of habits, 

habitual method of life, HF. 28; had 

of a., was accustomed, B 3701. 
Adamant, s. adamant, A 1990 ; loadstone, 

magnet, R. 1182. 
Ada"we, v. awake, recover, T. iii. 1120. 
A-day, in the day, T. ii. 60. 
Adding-, 5. (the) addition, A. ii. 41. 16. 
Adjeccioun, s. addition, B 5. p 6. 212. 
A-doun, at^T^. downwards, down, L. 178; 

down below, HF. 889; below, H 105; at 

the bottom, G 779. | 

Bb 



Adrad,;>/. afraid, A 605; Adred, 3. 1190. 

Adressing-e, s. directing, B 4. p 5. loi. 

Adversarie, adj. hostile, 1 697. 

Advertence, s. attention, heed, T. iv. 698. 

Adv6cacyes, //. pleas, T. ii. 1469. 

Advocats, pi. advocates (in which the t 
is mute), C 291. 

Afer. adv. afar, HF. 1215. 

A-f6re, on fire, 'W i. 229. 

A-fered, />/>. afraid, affrighted, T. i. 974; 
Afeid, A 628. 

Affectis, pi. desires, T. iii. 1391. 

Affermed, pp. agreed upon, L. 790 ; 
established, A 2349. 

Affiance, s. trust, B 1330. 

Afforced, pp. forced, I 974. 

Affray, s. fray, quarrel, D 2156; terror, B 
1 137 ; fright, 4. 214; dread, 7. 334, 

Affrayeth, pr. s. arouses, excites, R. 91 ; 
pp. frightened, afraid, B 563 ; scared, B 
4468 ; roused, 3. 296. 

Affyle, V. file, i. e. render smooth, A 712. 

AtOT-yeyn, prep, over against, T. ii. 1188. 

Afounde, v. founder, perish, 12. 21. 

Afrayed, adj. scared, distracted, R. 154. 

Afrig-ht, pp. affrighted, B 4085. 

After, prep, according to ; in expectation 
of, for, B 467 ; to get, A 525 ; according 
as, L, 575; after, i. e. to fetch, L. 1130; 
towards, A 136; in accordance with, 8. 
4; by inheritance from, L. 1072; A. as, 
according as, 5. 216; A. oon, alike, A. 
1781 ; A. me, according to my command, 
E 327 ; A. the yeer, according to the 
season of the year, F 47 ; A. that, accord- 
ing as, T. ii. 1347. 

A-fyre, on fire, D 726 ; i. 94 ; A-f6re, T. i. 
229. 

Ag'ain, prep, when exposed to, L. 2426 ; 
Agayn, against, B580; towards, A 2680; 
(so as) to meet, R. 785 ; opposite to, R. 
1577; exposed to, H no; contrary to, F 
748; just before, B 4268; near, G 1279; 
to meet, B 391 ; in comparison with, L. 
189; Ageyn, against, A 66; compared 
with, R. ion ; turned towards, L. 48. 

Ag'ains, prep, against, contrary to, in 
answer to, instead of, before, in presence 
of, to meet, near to; against, near; 
against, B 3754. 

A-g'ame, adv. in play, in jest, in mockery, 
in sport, 4. 277. 

Ag-aste, ^er. to terrify, T. ii. 901 ; pr. s. 
deters, frightens, B 4. p 6. 323 ; pt. s. 
frightened, L. 1221 ; pt. s. rejl. was 
affrighted, A 2424 ; pp. scared, frightened, 
terrified, A 2931 ; aghast, B 4079 ; afraid, 
A 4267. 



(glossarial 3Iuti£i. 



Agayn-"ward. adv. backward, at the point 
of return, A. i. 17, 14; back again, B 441. 

Agres, pi. times, periods, B 3177. 

Agilten, v. do wrong, I^, 436 ; //. s. did 
offence, D 392; wrongly committed, L, 
2385 ; I pt. s. wronged, HF. 329 ; offended, 
T. iii. 840 ; pr. s. subj. (if he) offend, 

1 150; //. offended, i. 122; sinned, T. v. 
1684, 

Agon, V. to go away ; Ago, //. gone away, 
T. V. 1054 ; gone, F 1204 ; passed away, 
A 2802; past, L. 1766; dead, L. 916; to 
ben ago, to be off, 5. 465; Agon,//, de- 
parted, A 1276; gone away, C 810; past, 
C 246 ; tiat longe a. is, it is not long ago, 
D 9 ; passed away, A 1782 ; dead, E 631 ; 
ago, B 1841. 

Agreable. adj. pleasing, HF. 1097 ; -es,//. 
pleasant, B 3. m 2. 31. 

Agreablely, adv. complacently, B 2. p 4. 
1^0. 

Agreabletee, s. equability, B 2. p 4. 127. 

A-greef , in dudgeon, lit. ' in grief,' T. 
iii, 862 ; sadly, T. iv. 613 ; amiss, 5. 543 ; 
in dudgeon, B 4083. 

Agregge, v. aggravate; pr. s. I 960; 
pr. pi. I 892 ; pt. pi. aggravated, B 
2209. 

Agreved, pp. angry, A 2057 ; vexed, 
L. 345 ; aggrieved, E 500. 

Agrief; see Agreef. 

Agrisen, Agroos ; see Agrysen. 

Agroted, pp. surfeited, cloyed, L. 2454. 

Agrysen, v. shudder, tremble, feel terror, 
B I. p 3. 22; v. feel terror, HF. 210; 

2 pr. s. dreadest, B 2. p i. 71 ; 
/;-. s. trembles, shivers, B i. m 6. 
11; Agroos,//.^. shuddered, was terri- 
fied, became frightened, T. ii. 930; 
A-grisen, pp. filled with dread, B 3. 
p I. 18. 

Agu, s. ague, B 4150. 

Aguiler, s. needle-case, R, 98. 

A-heigh, adv. aloft. 

Ajuged, pp.; a. biforn, prejudged, B i. 

p 4. 109. 
Ake, V. ache, T. ii. 549; pr. pi. B 

2113. 
Aketoun, s. a short sleeveless tunic, worn 

under the hauberk, B 2050. 
Akinge, s. pain, T. i. 1088. 
Akno we, pp. conscious ; am aknowe, I ac- 
knowledge, B I. p 4. 169. 
Akornes, s. pi. fruits, B 4. m 3. 28. 
Al, adj. all, A 10; Alle, //. all, A 26, 53; 

Al, every, R. 1586 ; as s. everything, T. 

iii. 1764; al a, the whole of a, A 854; 

and al, and all, 3, 116; at al, in every 



respect, wholly, C 633 ; at all, D 1078 ; 
al day, all the day, 3. 1105: — Al, adv, 
quite, entirely, altogether, 5. 540; all 
over, R. 840; al on highte, quite aloud, 
A 1784 ; al by oon assent, quite with one 
accord, 5. 557: — Al, conj. although, 
HF. 1740 ; whether, G 839 ; al be, al- 
though, albeit, 4. 274; al be that, al- 
though, 5. 8: — Al and som, the whole 
matter (collectively and severally), D 
91 ; Al and somme, each and all, all, 
the whole, 7. 26; Al and som, 5. 650; 
Alle and some, one and all, A 3136; 
Al only, adv. merely, simply, 2. 62; Al 
so, so, E 1226 ; Al thing, everything, R, 
53 ; Al thus, exactly thus, 5. 30. See 
Alle. 

Al, s. awl, 13. II. See Oules. 

Alambyk (alambiik), ^. alembic, T. iv, 
520 ; pi. G 794. 

Alaunts, pi. dogs of a huge size, A 2148. 

Alayes, s.pl. alloy, E 1167. 

Al-be-it, although, L. 1363. 

Albiflcacioun, s. albefaction, whitening, 
G805. 

Alday, Al-day, adv. continually, A 1163 ; 
always, L. 1250 ; everyday, at any time, 

4- 237. 
Alder, gen. pi. of all ; oure alder, of us 

all, I. 84. See Aller. 
Alder-best, adv. best of all, 3. 87. Sec 

Aller. 
Alderbeste, adj. best of all, 3. 246. 
Alderfaireste, adj. fern. def. fairest of 

all, 3. 1050. 
Alderfirst, adv. first of all, B 2393 ; in the 

first place, R. 1000; for the first time, 

B I. p 3. 25. 
Alderflrste, adj. first of all, T. iii. 97. 
Alderlast, adv. lastly, R. 449. 
Alder-lest, least of all, T. i. 604. 
Alderlevest, dearest of all, T. iii. 239. 
Alderman, s. the head of a guild, A 

372. 
Aldermost, adv. most of all, T. i. 152. 
Alder-next, adv. nearest of all, aext, 

5. 244. 
Alderwysest, adj. pi. the wisest of all, 

T. i. 247. 
Ale and breed, drink and meat, B 2062. 
Alemandres, //. almond-trees, R. 1363, 
Alembykes, pi. alembics, G 794. 
Alestake, j^. ale-stake, i. e. a horizontal 

stake or short pole projecting from an 

ale-house to support a sign or bush, 

A 667. 
Aley, s. an alley, B 1758 ; //. walks, E 

2324. 



(gloseiatial Untiex. 



Aleys, s.pl. service-berries, berries of the 

service-tree, R. 1377. 
Algate, adv. always, A 571 ; at any rate, 

3. 887 ; nevertheless, L. 238 ; in any case, 

T, ii, 964 ; all the same, D 588 ; at all 

hazards, HF. 943. 
Algates, adv. in every way, 22. 43 ; by all 

means, D 1514; at any rate, in any case, 

3. 1171 ; wholly, F 246; nevertheless, B 

2222; all the same, B 520. 
JLliene, v. alienate, B i, p 6. 60. 
Al-if, even if, T. iii. 398. 
Alkamistre, s. alchemist, G 1204. 
JLlle, dat. s. a?7d pi. 0/ A\\ at alle, in 

every case, 4. 36 ; in alle, in any case, 

3. 141; Alle, pi. all (of you), T. ii. 402. 

See Al, Aller. 
Allegeaunce, s. alleviation, 24. 22. 
Allegged,//. allayed, B 4. p 4. 12. 
Aller, of all,^^«. pi. 0/ Al; our aller, of 

us all, A 823 ; kir aller, of them all, 

A 586. 
Alliauuce, s. kindred, i. 58; espousal, 

E357. 

Allone, adj. alone, 4. 141 ; lat me a., let 
me alone, i. e. trust to me, T. iii. 413. 

Allow, ip. s.pr. (I) approve, (I) applaud, 
F 676. 

Allye, s. relative, B 3593. 

Ally en, ger. to ally myself, E 1414 ; pp. 
allied, 2. 65 ; provided with friendly aid, 
B 3720. 

Almesse, s. alms, B 168 ; pi. almsdoings, 
I 1030. 

Almicanteras, s. pi. small circles of de- 
clination (in the celestial sphere), A. i. 
18. 2, 8, 

Almury, s. the ' denticle ' or tooth-like 
point or pointer situate on the Rete near 
the ' head' of Capricorn, A, i. 23. i. 

Aloes, pi. aloe, in comp. ligne-aloes, T. iv, 
1 137. (Aloes is a pi., not a gen. case.) 

A-lofte, adv. on high, T. v. 259. 

A-londe, adv. on land, ashore, L. 2166 ; 
Aim were lever a-l., he would rather be on 
land, L. 2413. 

Along: on, along of, owing to, T. iii. 783. 

Al-only, adv. solely, T. v. 1779. 

Aioon, adj. alone ; her aloon, all by her- 
self, E. 2478. 

Alose, v. commend, T. iv. 1473. 

Al-outerly, adv. entirely, absolutely, 3. 
1244 ; AU-utterly, HF. 296. 

Alpes, pi. bull-finches, R. 658. 

Also, Al-so, adv. and conj. as, R. 212, 1122; 
*dv. so, A 3104; Alswa,also (Northern), 
A 4085 ; A. many, as many, L. 528 ; A. 
muche as, as much as, D 2134; Als, also, 



besides, 3. 728; as, B 2850; frequently 

used in expressing a wish, 4. 267. 
Altercacioun, s. altercation, dispute, B 

4427. 
Altiier-fairest, adj. superl. fairest of all, 

R. 625. 
Alther-fastest, adv. sup. as fast as pos- 
sible, HF. 2131. 
Altherflrst, adv. first of all, at first, HF. 

1368. 
Alther-firste, adj. first of all, 3. 1173. 
Altitude, s. the elevation of a celestial 

object above the horizon, measured 

along a vertical arc, A. pr. 60. 
Al-utterly ; see Al-outerly. 
Alwey, adv. always, ceaselessly, all the 

while, A 185. 
Alyne, adv. in an exact line, A. ii. 38. 27. 
Am, am ; in phr. it am I ; it is I, B 1109. 
Amadrides, s.pl. hamadryads, A 2928. 
Almalg-aming-, s. the formation of an 

amalgam, G 771. 
A-mayed, pp. dismayed, T. i. 648. 
Anabag-es, pi. ambiguous words, T. v. 

897. 
Anabel, s. amble; ati a., in an amble, at 

an ambling pace, B 2075. 
Ambes as, double aces, B 124. 
Amblere, s. an ambling nag, A 469. 
Ameled, pp. enamelled, R. 1080. 
Amenden, v. make amends, A 3074; to 

surpass in demeanour, F 97 ; pr. s. subj. 

may (He) amend, D \'^\o\pt.s. improved, 

R. 1427; did good, 3. 1102; pp. improved, 

B 4048 ; remedied, D 1097 ; surpassed, B 

3444- 

Amendement, s. amends, A 4185. 

Amenuse, ger. to lessen, I 496 ; v. dimin- 
ish, I 360; pr. s. diminishes, I 359; be- 
comes less, A. i. 21. 76. 

Amerciments, s. pi. fines, exactions, 
I 752. 

Amesureth, pr. s. measures, B 2. p i. 95. 

Ameved, pt. s. moved, changed ; nought 
a., changed not, altered not, E 498; 
Amoeved,/!/. perturbed, I 670. 

Amiable, adj. kind, B 2168 ; courteous, 
I 629 ; kindly, R. 1226. 

A-midde, adv. in the midst, R. 147. 

Amidde, prep, amid, in the midst of, F 
409. 

Amiddes, adv. in the midst, 5. 277. 

A-middes, />r^/. in the midst of. A, i. 18. 
4 ; in the middle. A 2009. 

Amis, adv. amiss, 3. 1141 ; wrong, L. 1291 ; 
wrongly, B 3370; seyde amis, gave an 
unwelcome answer, 5. 446. 

Amoeve ; see Ameve. 



(Sloggatial IntJcx. 



Amonesteth, pr. s. admonishes, I 76; 

recommends, B 2484. 
Amonestinge, s. admonition, I 518. 
Among-, adv. as well, T. iii. 1816 ; all the 

while, 3. 298. 
Amonges, adv. sometimes, variously, B 2. 

p I. 119. 
AmongeSj/rif/. amongst, A 759. 
Amonicioun, s. pointing out, B i. p 4. 10. 
Amorettes, //. love-knots, R. 892. 
Amor vincit omnia, love conquers all, A 

162. 
Amorwe, A-morwe, on the morrow, 

A 822, 1621 ; in the morning, 3. 1103. 
Amounteth, pr. s. means, A 2362; 

amounts to, F 108. 
Amphibologyes, pi. ambiguities, T. iv. 

1406. 
Amy, s. friend, C 318. 
Au, a, A 575; An eighte busshels, a quan- 
tity equal to eight bushels, C 771. 
An, prep, on ; An heigh, on high, E 2326. 
Ancille, s. handmaiden, i. 109. 
Ancre, s. anchor, 10. 38; Anker, L. 2501. 
And, cottj. if, 6. 112; L. 217. 
Anes, adv. once (Northern), A 4074. 
Angle, s. angle (a technical term in 

astrology) , B 304 ; angular distance from 

the meridian, A. ii. 4. 48. 
Angle-hook, s. fish-hook, 4. 238. 
Angre, s. anguish, R. 320. 
Anguissh, s. anxiety, B 3. p 3. 55. 
Anguissheth, pr. s. wounds, pains, B 3. 

m 7. I. 
Anguissous, adj. distressed, R. 520; 

sorry, I 304; distressful, T. iii. 816. 
Anhange, ger. to hang, C 259; //. B 

3945- 

Anientlssed, pp. brought to naught, B 
2438. 

A-night, in the night, A 1042; at night, 
D 1827. 

A-nightes, adv. by night, R. 18. 

Anlas, s. a. short, two-edged knife or 
dagger, broad at the hilt and tapering 
to the point, formerly worn at the 
girdle, A 357. 

Annexed, pp. tied, 2. 72; attached, C 
482. 

Anni collecti, collected years, A. ii. 44. 27. 
When a table contains quantities de- 
noting the change in a planet's place 
during round periods of years, such as 
20, 40, or 60 years, such a change is 
entered under the heading Anni Collecti. 

Anni expansi, expanse years, A. ii. 44. 
26. When a table contains quantities 
denoting the change in a planet's place 



during only a few years, viz. from i to 

19 years, such changes are entered 

separately under the headings i, 2,. 

3, &c., years, which are designated the 

expanse (or separate) years. 
Annis collectis et expansis, the collected 

years and expanse years, A. ii. 45. 18. 

See above. 
Annueleer, s. a priest who received 

annual payments, a chaplain, G 1012. 
Annunciat,//. pre-announced, i. e. whose 

birth was foretold, B 3205. 
Anon, adv. anon, immediately, at once, 

A 32, 748. 
Anon-right, adv. immediately, L. 115, 

1503- 
Anon-rightes, adv. immediately, A 3480. 
Anoy, s. vexation, T. iv. 845 ; trouble, B 

1320 ; torture, B 3. m 12. 25 ; sadness, I 

678, 680; //. troubles, I 518. 
Anoye, v. annoy, vex, T. iv. 1304; pr. s. 

annoys, vexes, B 2234; gives offence, 

5. 518; does harm, F 875; impers. it 

vexes, G 1036; pr. pi. harm, B 2187; 

imp.pl. injure ye, B 494; pp. displeased, 

D 1848; wearied, I 726; peevish, I 1051. 
Anoyful, adj. annoying, tiresome, B 

2222. 
Anoyous, adj. annoying, tedious, B 2433 ; 

disagreeable, B 2235. 
Answere, v. answer, D 1077 ; a. of, answer 

for, be responsible for, L. 2212; be suit- 
able for, B 4. p 3. 69. 
Answering, 5. answer, E 512. 
Antartik, adj. southern, A. ii. 25. 11. 
Antem, s. anthem, B 1850. 
Antiphoner, s. anthem-book, B 1709. 
Antony, fyr of seint, erysipelas, I 427. 
Anvelt, s. anvil, 3. 1165. 
Any-thing, at all, in any degree, T. i. 

848. 
Aornement, s. adornment, I 432. 
Apaire ; see Apeiren. 
Apalled, pp. vapid, I 723 ; weakened, A 

3053 ; pale, F 365 ; languid, B 1292. 
Aparayles, s. pi. ornaments, B 2. p 4. 

69. {L.a.t. ornamentis.) 
Aparaile, v. apparel, D 343 ; prepare, L. 

2473 ; Apparaillen, v. prepare, B 2532 ; 

pr. s. endues, I 462 ; i/np. s. prepare, B 

2534. 
Aparailements, s. pi. ornaments, B 2. 

P5- 181. 
Aparcey ve ; see Aperceive. 
Apassed, pp. passed away, B 2. p 5. 35. 
Apaye, v. to satisfy; pp. satisfied, T. v. 

1249 ; pleased, T. iii. 421 ; yvel a., ill 

pleased, L. 80 ; E 1052. 



(glossarial 3InlJei. 



Apayre ; see Apeiren. 

Apayse; see Apese. 

Ape, s. ape, HF. 1212; dupe, A 3389; //. 

dupes, T. i. 913. 
Apeiren, ^(fr. to injure, impair, A 3147; 

V. I 1079; grow worse, HF. 756; i pr. 

pi. perish, T. ii. 329 ; pp. impaired, B i. 

p 5. 67 ; injured, T. i. 38. 
Aperceive, v. perceive, E 600 ; Apar- 

ceyve, T, iv. 656 ; //-, s. discerns, I 294. 
Aperceyvinges,//. perceptions, obser- 
vations, F 286. 
Apert, adj. manifest, I 649. 
Apert, adv. openly, F 531. 
Apertenant, adj. belonging to, such as 

belongs to, 2. 70 ; suitable, E loio. 
Aperteneth, pr. s. impers. appertains, B 

2171 ; pr. pi. I 83 ; pres. pt. belonging, 

G785. 
Apertly, adv. openly ; clearly, I 294. 
Apese, Apeise, v. appease, pacify ; E 

433; iinp. pi. mitigate, 4. 10; pr. s. rejl. 

is pacified, B 3051; 'zpr. pi. T. iii. 22; 

//. s. B 2290; pp. appeased, T. i. 250. 
Apeyre ; see Apeire. 
Apeyse ; see Apese. 
Apose ; see Appose. 
Apotecarie, s. apothecary, B 4138 ; pi. 

preparers of medicines, A 425. 
Appalled ; see Apalle. 
Apparaunte, adj.pl. apparent, manifest, 

R.5. 

Apparence, s. appearance, F 218 ; seem- 
ing, HF. 265; apparition, F 1602; false 
show, F 1157; pi. apparitions, F 1140. 

Appese ; see Apese. 

Appetyt, -f. desire, A 1680. 

Appetyteth, pr. s. seeks to have, desires, 
L. 1582. 

Apply en, v. be attached to, B 5. p 4. 14. 

Apposed, //. s. questioned, G 363 ; pp. 
opposed, alleged, B i. p 5. 54. 

Apprentys, adj. unskilled, as novices, 
R. 687. 

Appreved, pp. approved, E 1349. 

Appropred, pp. appropriated, made the 
property of, 14. 18. 

Approwours, //. approvers, informers, 

^ 1343- 
Aprochen, v. approach, T. v. i. 
Apurtenance, j^. appurtenance ; pi. I 

793- 
Apyked, pp. trimmed, adorned, A 

365- 
Aqueynte me, make myself acquainted, 

3. 532; //. pi. became acquainted, HF. 

250 ; pp. acquainted, B 1219. 
Aquyte, iyjip. s. requite, T. ii. 1200. 



Arace, v. eradicate, uproot, T. v. 954; 

tear away, 6. 20 ; pr. s. subj. root out, 

eradicate, T. iii. 1015 ; pp. torn, borne 

along; torn away, B 3. p 11. 165. 
Araise ; see Areise. 
Aray, s. array, dress, L. 1505; arrange- 
ment, T. iii. 536; state, dress, A 41, 73; 

attire, I 932 ; array of garments, L. 2607 ; 

order, E 262 ; ordinance, E 670 ; position, 

D 902; condition, A 934. 
Arayed, pp. dressed, ready, T. iii. 423 ; 

clad, R. 472; adorned, T. ii. 1187; wel 

a., well situated, T. ii. 680; equipped, A 

2046; dressed, F 389; ordered, B 252; 

appointed, F 1187. 
Arbitre, s. will, choice, B 5. p 3. 18. 
Arches ; see Ark. 
Archaungel, s. titmouse, R. 915. 
Archewyves, s. pi. archwives, ruling 

wives, E 1 195. 
Ardaunt, adj. ardent, B 3. m 12. 15; 

eager, B 4. p 3. 116. 
Arede, v. explain, disclose, T. ii. 1505 ; 

counsel, T. iv. 1112; interpret, 3. 289; 

ger. to divine, T. ii. 132. 
Areise, v. raise ; Areysen, ger. to levy, 

I 567 ; pp. praised, L. 1525 ; raised, A. 

ii. 2. 7. 
Arest, s. rest (for a spear), A 2602. 
Areste, s. arrest, B 4090; detention, A 

1310; responsibility, E 1282; delay, L. 

806; hesitation, L. 1929; deliberation, 

L. 397- 

Areste, v. stop (a horse), A 827; Do a., 
cause to be stopped, B 4210. 

Aretten, v. impute, B 2. p 4. 14 ; A. upon, 
pr. s. accuses, I 580; pr.pl. subj. ascribe, 
I 1002 ; ye n'arette it nat, ye impute it 
not, consider it not, A 726; //. imputed, 
A 2729. 

A-reAwe, adv. successively, lit. in a row, 
D 1254. 

Areyse; see Areise. 

Argoile, s. crude tartar, G 813. 

Arg-uinge, s. argument, L. 475. 

Argumented, />/. s. argued, T. i. 377. 

Aright, adv. rightly, well, A 267; aright, 
G 1418 ; properly, F 694 ; wholly, A 189 ; 
exactly, T. v. 364 ; certainly, B 3135. 

Arisen, Arist; see Aryse. 

Ariste, s. arising, rising, A. ii. 12. 16. 

Ark, s. arc, referring to the arc of the 
horizon extending from sunrise to sun- 
set, B 2 ; daily course of the sun, E 
1795 ; arc, the apparent angular dis- 
tance passed over by the sun in a day 
and a night, A. ii. 7. 12; Arches, pi. 
arcs, A. ii. 7. 15. 



(§lossaiial Huticx. 



Armes, pi. arms, weapons, 7. i ; coat-of- 

arms, A 1012. 
Arm-greet, adj. thick as one's arm, A 

2145- 

Arming'e, s. putting on of armour, B 
2037. 

Armipotente, adj. powerful in arms, 
A 1982. 

Armoniak, adj. ammoniac ; applied to 
bole, G 790, and sal, G 798. It is a 
corruption of Lat. armeniacuni, \. e. Ar- 
menian. 

Armonye, s. harmony, 3. 313. 

Armure, s. defensive armour, 4. 130; B 
200Q. 

Armurers, pi. armourers, A 2507. 

Arn, pr. pi. are, HF. 1008. 

Aroos : see Aryse. 

A-roume, adv. at large, in an open 
space, HF. 540. 

A-rowe, adv. in a row, HF. 1835. 

Arowe, s. ; see Arwe. 

Arrace ; see Arace. 

Array, Arrays ; see Aray, Arayed. 

Arrerage, s. arrears, A 602. 

Arrette ; see Aretten. 

Arrivage, s. coming to shore, HF, 223. 

Arryve, v. arrive, come to land, 10. 38; 
pr. s. (it) arrives, L. 2309; pt. s. drove 
ashore, B 4. m 3. i ; yvel-a., ill-fated, 
R. 1068. 

Ars-metryke, s. arithmetic, D 2222. 

Artelleries, s. pi. engines for shooting, 
B 2523. 

Arten, g-er. to constrain, urge, T. i. 388. 

Artificial, adj. A. ii. 7. rub. The day 
artijicial is the length of the day, from 
the moment of sunrise to that of 
sunset. 

Artik, northern, A. i. 14. 10. 

Artow, art thou, A 1141; thou art, L. 
986. 

Arwe, s. arrow, T. ii. 641 ; Arowe, 7. 185 ; 
pi. arrows, A 107. 

Aryse, v. arise, be raised, T. iv. 1480; 
pr. s. rises, I 971 ; Arist, pr. s. {contr. 
from ariseth) arises, B 265 ; Aroos, pt. s. 
arose, 5. 575 ; stood up, L. 831 ; Arisen, 
//. pi. arose, T. ii. 1598 ; Aryse, pr. s. 
subj. may arise ; Fro the sonne aryse, 
from the point where the sun rises. 

Arysing, s. rising, rise, A. ii. 12. i. 

Aryve, s. lit. arrival ; landing, disem- 
barkation of troops, A 60. 

Aryve ; see Arryve. 

As, so Tin asseverations), 3. 838, 1235; an 
expletive, expressing a wish, commonly 
used with an imperative, e. g. as lat. 



pray let, B 859 ; as lene, pray lend, A 
3777, &c. ; As, like, B 1864 ; as that, 
F 1018 ; As after, according to, B 3555 ; 
As ferforth as, as far as, B 19; As in, 
i. e. for, B 3688 ; As now, at present, at 
this time, A 2264 ; on the present 
occasion, G 944 ; for the present, G 
1019; As nouthe, as at this time, at 
present, A 462; As of, with respect to, 
5. 26; As swythe, as soon as possible, 
at once, 7. 226 ; As that, as soon as, 
F 615 ; as though, 3. 1200 ; As ther, there, 
4. 117 ; As to, with reference to, F 107 ; 
As to my wit, as it seems to me, 5. 

547- 

As, s. an ace, B 3851 ; Ambes as, pi. double 
aces, B 124. 

Asay : see Assay. 

Ascaunce, as if, perhaps, G 838 ; in case 
that, L. 2203 ; Ascaunces, as if, D 1745 ; 
as if to say, T. i. 205, 292. Compounded 
of E. as, and O. F. quanses, as if. 

Ascencioun, s. ascension, ascending 
degree, B 4045 ; rising up, G 778. 

Ascende, v. ascend, rise (a term in 
astrology), I 11; pres. part, ascending, 
in the ascendant, i. e. near the eastern 
horizon, F 264. 

Ascendent, s. ascendant, A 417 ; pi. HF. 
1268. The ' ascendant ' is that degree 
of the ecliptic which is rising above 
the horizon at a given moment. 

Asemble ; see Assemble. 

Aseuraunce, s. assurance, T. v. 1259. 

Ash ; see Asshe. 

Ashamed, pp. put to shame, A 2667 ; for 
pure a., for very shame, T. ii, 656. 

Asketh, pr. s. requires, T. i. 339. 

Asking, s. question, L, 313. 

Aslake, v. diminish, A 3553 ; pp. assuaged, 
A 1760. 

Asonder, adv. asunder, apart, A 491. 

Asp, s. aspen tree, A 2921 ; collectively, 
R. 1384. A, S. cBps. 

Aspect, i-, an (astrological) aspect, A 1087. 
An ' aspect ' is the angular distance 
between two planets. The principal 
aspects 2lX^ five, viz. conjunction, sextile, 
quartile, trine, and opposition, corre- 
sponding to the angular distances 0°, 60°, 
90'^ 1200, and 180°, respectively. 

Aspen-leef, s. leaf of an aspen tree, D 
1667. 

Aspre, adj. sharp, bitter, T, iv. 827 ; 
vexatious, B 3. p 8. 19 ; cruel, B 2. p 
8. 39; fierce, hardy, 7. 23. 

Asprenesse, s. asperity, B 4. p 4. 159. 

Aspye, .. spy, C 755, 



(glossarial JIntiex. 



Aspye, V. spy, see, A 1420; Aspyen, v. 
behold, T. ii. 649. 

Assaut, s. assault, A 989. 

Assay, s. trial, D 290; doon his a., make 
his atteiDpt, L. 1594; A-say, test, L. 
28 a. 

Assaye, v. try, make trial of, B 3149; 
^ry, 3. 574 ; endeavour, F 1567 ; ger. to 
assail, T, i. 928; pr. s. experiences, B 3. 
m 2. 13 ; pr. pi. try, L. 487 ; imp. pi. 
try, E 1740; pp. proved, tested, tried, 
experienced, T. iii. 1220, 1447; A 1811. 

Assay le ; see Assaile. 

Asseg"e, s. siege, T. i. 464, ii. 107. 

Assege, v. besiege; pt. pi. T. i. 60; //. 
A 881. 

Assemble, v. ; come together, I 909 ; ger. 
to amass, B 3. p 8. 8 ; //. A 717 ; united, 
G50. 

Assembling-e, s. union, I 904, 917. 

Assendent ; see Ascendent. 

Assente, v. agree to, A 374 ; assent, A 
3092; consent, B 3469; agree, E 11, 
88, 129. 

Asshe (i), ,f. ash-tree, 5. 176; collectively, 

ash-trees, R. 1384. 
Asshe (2), s. ash (of something burnt) ; 
Asshen,//. ashes, 7. 173; A 1302. 

Assoilen, ger. to discharge, pay, B 5. 
p 1. 15 ; V. loosen ; pr. s. absolve, pardon, 
C 913 ; pp. explained, B 5. p 6. 311. 

Assoiling", s. absolution, A 661. 

Assure, s. assurance, protestation, 7. 331, 

Assure, v. feel secure, trust, T. v. 870; 
rely, T. v. 1624 ; declare (to be) sure, 
7.90. 

Assyse, s. assize, session, A 314; judge- 
ment, I. 36; position, R. 900. 

Asterte, v. escape, L. 1802 ; A 1595 ; es- 
cape from, L. 2338 ; D 968 ; get away, 
withdraw, 3. 1154; release, D 1314; //. 
s. escaped, T. iii. 97 ; pp. escaped, B 

437. 
Astonie, v. astonish ; pr. s. astonishes, 

HF. 1174; pp. astonished, T. i. 274, iii. 

1089. 
Astonyinge, s. astonishment, B 4. p 5. 33. 
Astore, v. to store ; pp. A 609. 
Astrolabie, s. astrolabe, A. pr. 4. 
Astrologien, s. astrologer, astronomer, 

D 324. 
Astrologrye, s. astrology, A 3192, 3514. 
Astro naye (y^r Astronomye) , an ignorant 

form, A 3451, 3457. 
Asure, s. azure, R. 477. 
Asweve, v. ; pp. dazed, put to sleep, HF. 

549- 
A-swown, adv. {from pp.) in a swoon, 



L. 2207 ; Aswowe, 7. 354 ; hence As- 
wowne, in a swoon, T. iii. 1092 ; A 3823. 

At, prep, at, A 20, (S;c. ; of, R. 378 ; as to, 
6. 114; by, D 2095; in the presence of. 
T. ii. 984; with, beside, HF. 1593; to, 
HF. 1603; At me, with respect to me, 
B 1975; At erste, firste of all, HF. 512; 
At his large, free, free to speak or be 
silent, A 2288; At on, at one, agreed, 
A 4197 ; At shorte wordes, briefly, 5. 
481; At regard, with regard, I 180; At 
ye, at (your) eye, with your own eyes, 
visibly, A 3016; have at thee, I attack 
thee, L. 1383. 

At-after, prep, after, B 1445. 

Atake, v. overtake, G 556, 585. 

Ataste, -zpr. s. subj. taste, B 2. p i. 41. 

Ataynt; see Atteine. 

Atazir, s. evil influence, B 305. 

Atempraunce, s. temperament, B 4. p 6. 
214; adjustment, moderation, temper- 
ance, C 46, 

Atempre, adj. temperate, mild, L. 128, 
1483; moderate, T. i. 953; mild, 5. 204; 
R. 131; modest, I 932. 

Atempre, v.\ pr. s. attempers, B i. m 2. 
23 ; refl. controls himself, B 2704. 

Atemprely, adv. temperately, I 861 ; 
moderately, B 2728. 

Atempring-e, s. controlling, B 5. p 4. loi. 

Ateyne ; see Atteine. 

Athamaunt, s. adamant, A 1305. 

Athinken, v. displease, T. v. 878; Athink- 
eth, pr. s. ijnpers. (it) repents, T. i. 1050. 

At-ones, adv. at once, at one and the 
same time, B 670. 

Atoon, adv. at one, E 437. 

At-rede, v. surpass in counsel, T. iv. 
1456 ; A 2449. 

At-renne, v. surpass in running, T. iv. 
1456 ; A 2449. 

Attamed, pp. broached, B 4008. 

Attayne ; see Atteine. 

Atte, for at the. D 404; Atte beste, in 
the best way, A 29, 749; Atte fan, at 
the fan, H 42; Atte fuUe, at the full, 
completely, A 651 ; Atte gate, at the 
gate, B 1563 ; Atte hasard, at dice, 
C 608; Atte laste, at the last, B 506; 
Atte leste, at the least, at least, B 38 ; 
Atte Bowe, at Bow, A 125. 

Atteine, v. attain, R. 1495; succeed in, 
4. 161 ; pp. apprehended, B 3. p 3. 25. 

Attempre ; see Atempre. 

Attry, adj. venomous, I 583. 

A-tweyn, adv. in two, 3. 1193. 

A-twinne, adv. apart, 1\ iii. 1666. 

Atwixe, prep, betwixt, R. 854. 



B b 3 



lO 



^lossavial hxtitx. 



A-twixen, prgp. between, T. v. 472. 

A-two, in twain, 7. 94; L. 758. 

A-tyr, s. attire, dress, T. i. 181. 

Auctor; see Auctour. 

Auctoritee, s. authority, B 2355 ; recog- 
nised text, A 3000; statements of good 
authors, D i. 

Auctour, s. author, HF. 314 ; originator, 
H 359 ; creator, T. iii. 1765. 

Audience, s. hearing, 5. 308 ; audience, 
B 3991 ; open assembly, D 1032. 

Augrim, s. algorism, i, e. numeration, A. 
i. 7. 6; Arabic numerals, A. i. 8. 6. 

Augrim-stones, //. counters for calcu- 
lating, A 3210. 

Auncessour, s. ancestor; pi. R. 391. 

Auncestre, s. ancestor, 5. 41. 

Auncetrye, s. ancestry, A 3982. 

Aung-el, s. angel, R. 916. 

Aung-ellyk, ad/, angelical, T. i. 102. 

Aungellyke, adv. like an angel, L. 236. 

Auntre it, v. risk it, A 4209; Auntred 
him,jz>/. s. adventured himself, A 4205. 

Auntrous, adj. adventurous, B 2099. 

Autentyke, adj. authentic, 3. 1086. 

Auter, s. altar, 5. 249. 

Avale, V. fall down, T. iii, 626; doff, take 
off, A 3122 ; Avalen, pr. pi. sink down. 

Avantag-e, s. advantage, F 772 ; to don 
his a., to suit his own interests, B 729 ; 
as adj. advantageous, B 146. 

Avante ; see Avaunte. 

Avaunce, v. promote, L. 2022; ger. T. i. 
518; be profitable, A 246; cause to 
prosper, HF. 640; help, 10. 31. 

Avaunt, j. vaunt, boast, A 227, E 1457. 

Avaunte (her), v. rejl. boast (herself), 7. 
296; ger. to extol, HF. 1788; v. rejl. 
boast, vaunt himself, D 1014. 

Avaunting', s. boasting, A 3884. 

Avauntour, s. boaster, 5. 430. 

Avenaunt, adj. graceful, comely, R. 1263. 

Aventayle, s. ventail, E 1204. 

Aventure, s. chance, 4. 21 ; peril, B 1151 ; 
misfortune, L. 657 ; fortune, 18. 22 ; 
luck, T. ii. 288, 291 ; circumstance, L. 
1907; of a., by chance, HF. 2090; oti a., 
in case of mishap, T. v. 298; iti a., in 
the hands of fortune, T. i. 784; per a., 
perchance, A. ii. 12. 6 ; in a. and grace, 
on luck and favour, 4. 60; good a., good 
fortune, 5. 131, 7. 324; pi. adventures, 
A 795 ; accidents, C 934. 

Aventurous, adj. random, B i. p 6. 98 ; 
adventitious (L,a.t. /orlni Ice), B 2. p 4. 17. 

Avisee, adj. deliberate, L. 1521. 

Avisioun, s. vision, R. 9 ; HF. 7. 

Avouterye, s. adultery, 5. 361. 



Avoutier, s. adulterer; //. 1 841. 

Avow, s. vow, A 2414, 2237. 

Avowe, V. avow, own, proclaim, G 642; 
pr. s. vows, 7. 355. 

Avoy, inlerj. fie ! B 4098. 

Avys, s. advice, consideration, opinion, 
A 786, B 2442. 

Avyse, v. consider, T. i. 364; contem- 
plate, T. V. 1814; ref. consider, B 664; 
i»7p. s. take heed, A 4188 ; ifnp. pi. con- 
sider, deliberate, A 3185; pp. clearly 
seen, R. 475 ; with mind made up, T. 
iii. 1186; advised, careful, A 3584; 
deliberate, I 448 ; wary, A 4333 ; fore- 
warned, B 2538; zoell a., well advised, 
B 2514. 

Avysely , adv. advisedly, B 2488 ; seriously, 
I 1024 ; carefully, A. ii. 29. 29. 

Avysement, s. consideration, B 2941 ; 
counsel, T. ii. 343 ; deliberation, B 86 ; 
determination, L. 1417. 

Await, s. watch, D 1657; surveillance, H 
149 ; waiting, T. iii. 579 ; watchfulness, 
T. iii. 457 ; Have hir in awayt, watch 
her, B 3915 ; //. plots, B 3. p 8. 11. 

Awaite, v. await; pr. s. waits, i. m; 
watches, B 1776. 

Awaiting-, s. attendance, 7. 250. 

Awaitour, s. Her in wait, B 4. p 3. 122. 

Awake, v. wake, awake; Awook, 1 pi. s. 
aroused, 3. 1324; pi. s. awoke, F 367; 
Awaked,//, s. awoke, A 2523. 

Award, s. decision, I 483. 

Awen, own (Northern), A 4239. 

A-wepe, a-weeping, in tears, T. ii. 408. 

A-werke, adv. at work, D 215. 

Aweye, adv. out of the way, done with, 
T. ii. 123; gone, 7, 319; from home, B 
593 ; astray, B 609. 

Aweyward, adv. away, backwards, H 
262. 

Awhape, v. amaze; pp. scared, L. 132; 
stupefied, 7. 215 ; confounded, T. i. 316. 

Aw^ook; see Awake. 

Awreke, v. avenge, 2. 11 ; pr. s, avenges, 
R. 278 ; pp. H 298 ; A 3752. 

Awry, adv. on one side, R. 291. 

Axen, V. ask, L. 835 ; Axe at, ask of, T. ii. 
894 ; pr. s. requires, T. ii. 227. 

Axing-, s. question, L. 239 a ; request, A 
1826. 

Ay, adv. aye, ever, A 63, 233 ; Ay whyl 
that, all the while that, 4. 252. 

Ay-dwelling-e, adj. perpetual, ever-abid- 
ing, B 5. p 6. 97. 

Ayein, prep, opposite to, T. ii. 920; 
against, T. i. 902. 

Ayein, adv. again, back, 5. 100. 



(glossarial Enticx. 



II 



Ayein-leding-e, adj. returning, recon- 
ducting, B 3. m 9. 42. 

Ayeins, prep, against, A 1787 ; towards, 
at the approach of. 5. 342. 

Ayeins, adv. against, to, A 3155. 

Ayeinward, adv. again, on the other 
hand, B 2. p 4. 126; back again, T. iii. 
750, iv. 1581. 

Ayel, s. grandfather, A 2477. 

Azimut, s. azimuth, A. ii. 31. 22. 

B. 

Ba. V. kiss, D 433 ; imp. s. A 3709. 

Babe"winnes,/>/. (lit. baboons) , grotesque 
figures in architecture, HF. 1189. 

Bachelere, s. young knight, R. 918, 1469; 
an aspirant to knighthood, A 80. 

Bachelrye, s. bachelor-hood, H 125 ; com- 
pany of young men, E 270. 

Bad ; see Bidde. 

Badder, adj. comp. worse, F 224. 

Bagge, V. ; pr. s. looks askant, 3. 623. 

Bag-g-epype, s. bagpipe, A 565. 

Bagging-ly, adv. squintingly, R. 292. 

Baite, v. bait; feed, B 466;//. baited, 
tormented, R. 1612. 

Bak, s. back, 3. 957; cloth for the back, 
coarse mantle, rough cloak, G 881. 

Bakbyter, s. backbiter, I 495. 

Bake metes, baked meats, meat pies, 

I 445- 
Bakhalf, the back or flat side of the 

astrolabe, A. i. 4. i. 
Bak-side, s. the back of the astrolabe, A. 

i- 15- 3- 

Balaunce, j'. a balance, G611 ; inbalaiince, 
in jeopardy, G 611 ; in suspense, 3. 1021. 

Bale, s. sorrow, 3. 535 ; for bote tie bale, for 
good nor for ill, 3. 227. 

Balke, s. balk, beam, A 3920; pi. trans- 
verse beams beneath a roof, A 3626. 

Balled, adj. bald, A 198, 2518. 

Bane, s. death, L. 2159; destruction, HF. 
408; cause of death, A 1097; slayer, T. 

iv. 333- 

Banes, pi. bones (Northern), A 4073. 

Bar, Bare ; see Bere, v. 

Barbe, s. barb (part of a woman's head- 
dress, still sometimes used by nuns, 
consisting of a piece of white plaited 
linen, passed over or under the chin, 
and reaching midway to the waist), T. 
ii. no. 

Barbre, adj. barbarian, B 281. 

Bareine, adj. barren, B 68, D 372. 

Barel ale, barrel of ale, B 3083. 

Bark, s. (of a tree), T. iii. 727. 

Bb 



Barm-clooth, s. apron, A 3236 
Barme, s. {dat.) bosom, lap, H 3256, 3630. 
Baronage, s. assembly ot barons, A 3096. 
Barre, s. bar, A 1075 ; Barres, pi. stripes 

across a girdle, A 329. 
Barred, pp. furnished with ' bars,' A 3225. 
Barring-e, s. adorning with (heraldic) 

bars. I 417. 
Basilicok, s. basilisk, I 853. 
Baste, V. baste; pres.part. basting, tack- 
ing on, R. 104. 
Bataile, s. battle, fight, L. 1647; troop, B 

5. m I. 4. 
Batailen, v. fight, B i. p 4. 251. 
Batailled, adj. embattled, i. e. notched 

with indentations, B 4050. 
Batere, v. batter; pr. s. strikes, I 556. 
Bathe, both (Northern), A 4087. 
Bathe, ger. to bathe, to bask, T. ii. 849; 

rejl. to bask, B 4457. 
Bauderye, s. bawdry, act of a pandar, T. 

iii. 397 ; mirth, A 1926. 
Baudrik, s. baldric, belt worn trans- 
versely over one shoulder, A 116. 
Baudy', adj. dirty, G 635. 
Baume, s. balm, HF. 1686. 
Baundon, s. power, disposal, R. 1163. 
Bay, adj. bay-coloured, A 2157. 
Bayard, a horse's name ; a horse, A 41 15. 
"Qq-, prefix ; see also B1-. 
Beau, adj. fair ; beau sir, fair sir, HF. 643. 
Be-bled, pp. bloodied, covered with blood, 

B 3. m 2. 14. 
Beblotte, iinp. s. blot, T. ii. 1027. 
Bechen, adj. made of beech, G 1160. 
Become, v. go to, L. 2214 ; //. gone to, 7. 

247. 
Bed, s. L. 2211; station, B 3862; bed (of 

herbs), B 4411. 
Bedding-e, s. couch, A 1616. 
Bede, v. offer, proffer, HF. 32; G 1065; 

I pr. s. proffer, 7. 304; Bedeth, /r. s. 

proffers, E 1784; Bede, \ pt.pl. directed, 

told, I 65; Boden,//. commanded, T. iii. 

691 ; ordered, L. 266. 
Bede, pt. pi. and pp. of Bidde. 
Beden, pt. pi. of Bidde. 
Bedes, pi. beads, A 159. 
Bedote, v. befeol, L. 1547. 
Bedrede, adj. bedridden, D 1769. 
Beek, s. beak, F 418. 
Beem, s. balk, B 4362; Bemes,//. beams, 

R. 1574. 
Been, pi. bees, F 204. 
Beer, bare ; pt. s. of Bere. 
Beest, s. beast, F 460 ; Beest roial = royal 

beast, i. e. Leo, F 264; brute, G 288; 

beast, quarry, R. 1452. 



12 



(fllossarial h\ti(x. 



Beet, pf. s. arid imp. s. of Bete. 

Beeth, imp. pi. of Ben, to be. 

Beggostere, s. beggar, properly a female 
beggar, A 242. 

Betiette ; see Bihote. 

Bekke. i pr. s. (I) nod, C 396; pt. s. 
nodded to, T. ii. 1260. 

Bel amy, i. e. good friend, fair friend, C 
318; Bele, adj. fern, fair, beautiful, HF. 
1796 ; Bele chere, excellent fare, B 1599 ; 
Bele chose, beautiful part, D 447. 

Belle, s. bell, T. ii. 1615; (of a clock), 3. 
1322; (sign of an inn), A 719; here 
the b., be the first, T. iii. 198. 

Belweth, pr. 5. roars, HF. 1803. 

Bely, s. belly, B 2167. 

Bely, s. a pair of bellows, I 351. 

Bely-naked, adj. entirely naked, E 1326. 

Berne, s. trumpet, HF. 1240; pi. B 4588. 

Ben, Been, v. be, i. 182; \pr. pi. are, 3. 
582; Ben, 2. pr.pl. B 122; consist, I 82; 
Beth, pr. pi. are, F 648; Be, pr. s. subj. 
exists, it should be, 4. 49 ; Be, i pr. s. subj. 
be, am, D 1245; Beth, iinp. pi. be, C 
683; Been, pp. 3. 530; A 199; Be, pp. 
been, R. 322; / had be, I should have 
been, 3. 222 ; Be as be may, be it as it 
may, however it be, L. 1852 ; Be what she 
be, be she who she may, T. i. 679 ; Lat 
be, let alone, D 1289. 

Bench, s. bench, T. ii. 91 ; table, B 1548; 
bench (law court), i. 159. 

Bend, s. band, R. 1079. 

Bende, v. bend, R. 1334 ; turn, T. ii. 1250 ; 
Bente, //. s. bent, H 264 ; Bent, pp. i. 
29 ; arched, A 3246. 

Bending-e, s. adorning with (heraldic) 
bends, I 417. A bend, in heraldry, is 
a broad diagonal band upon a shield. 

B6ne, s. bean, 11. 29. 

Benedicite, bless ye (the Lord), A 1785; 
(pronounced ben cite), T. i. 780, &c. 

Benisoun, s. benison, blessing, B 2288. 

Bent, s. grassy slope ; Bente, dat. A 1981. 

Berafte ; see Bireve. 

Berd, s. beard, A 270, 2173 ; in the berd, 
face to face, T. iv. 41 ; make a berd, de- 
ceive, A 4096 ; jrake his berd, delude 
him, D 361. 

B6re, J. bear, L. 1214; the constellations 
Ursa Major and Ursa Minor, HF. 1004. 

B6re, s. bier, 2. 105 ; 19. 5. 

Bere, v. bear, carry, B 3564; transport, 
F 119; confer on, L. 2135; Bere yow, 
conduct yourself, D 1108; Beren on 
honde, accuse, D 393 ; Beren him on 
hond, assure him, D 232 (cf. 226) ; Bereth 
him, conducts himself, behaves, A 796; 



Bereth hir, comports herself, T. ii. 401 ; 
Berth hir on hond, bears false witness 
against her, B 620; Bereth him on hond, 
accuses him, I 505; Sickly berth, take 
ill, dislike, E 625 ; Bere, pr. pi. 3. 894 ; 
Bere, 2pt. s. barest, T. iv. 763 ; Bar,//, j-. 
bare, carried, A 105 ; possessed, D 997 ; 
pt. s. rejl. conducted himself, T. iii. 490 ; 
Bar on honde, made him believe, D 575 ; 
Bar her on honde, brought against her 
a charge which he feigned to believe, 7. 
158 ; Baren us, i pt. pi. conducted our- 
selves, A 721 ; Baren me on hond, bore 
false witness against me, B. i. p 4. 180; 
pr. s. subj. may pierce, A 2256; Ber, 
imp. s. carry, D 1139; Ber ayein, take 
back, T. ii. 1141; Boren, //. born, D 
1 153; Bore, /!/>. born. 

Bere, i'. head-sheet, pillow-case, 3. 254. 

Berie, s. berry, A 4368. 

Berie, v. bury, C 884. 

Bering-e, J-. behaviour, B 2022; carriage, 
E 1604. 

Berke, v. bark; Borken,//. shrieked (lit. 
barked), B i. p 5. i. 

Berm, s. barm, i. e. yeast, G 813. 

Bern, s. barn, B 3759. 

Beryle. s. beryl, HF. 1184. 

Besaunt-wig-ht, s. weight of a besant, R. 
1 106. {^Besant, a gold coin of Byzan- 
tium.) 

Bespreynt ; see Bispreng-e. 

Bestialitee, s. animal condition, T. i. 

735- 
Bet, adj. comp. better, 10. 47; HF. 108. 
Bet, adv. better, A 242; go bet, go faster, 

go as quickly as possible, 3. 136 ; the bet, 

the better, HF. 559; bet and bet, better 

and better, T. iii. 714. 
B6te, V. remedy, heal, T. i. 665 ; amend, 

mend, assist, 1 421; kindle, A 2253. 
B6te,^^/-. to beat, flap, B 4512 ; to hammer 

out, C 17 ; Beet,//, s. adjoined (lit. beat), 

R. 129 ; Beten, //. beaten, B 1732 ; as adj. 

beaten, ornamented with the hammer, 

R. 837. 

Beth,//-.//, are, B 2350; imp, pi. be, i. 

134- 
Betraising", s. betrayal, L. 2460. 
Bettre, adj. better, A 256; b. arm, right 

arm, T. ii. 1650. 
Bever, adj. made of beaver, A 272. 
Beye, ger. to buy, T. v. 1843; v. B 1462. 

See Bye. 
Bibbe, v.; pp. imbibed, A 4162. 
Bible, s. bible, A 438; book, HF. 1334. 
Bi-bledde, //.//. covered with blood, A 



#Io0sarial Euticx. 



13 



Bicched bones, s.pl. dice, C 656. 
Bi-clappe, ger. to catch (as in a trap), 

G9. . ^ 

Biconae,^^r. to become, D 1644 ; Bicomth, 
//•. s. goes, T, ii. 795. 

Bidaffed, pp. befooled, E 1191. 

Bidde, v. ask [confused with Bede, v. com- 
mand, bid) ; ger. to request, L. 838 ; 
I pr. s. pray, T. i. 1027 ; Bit, pr. s. bids, 
A 187 ; Bad, ;!>/. s. prayed, begged, T. iii. 
1249; besought, T. i. 112; requested, E 
373; I pt. s. bade, F 1212; pt. s. bade, 
commanded, D 108; Beden, />A //. bade, 
B 2233; Bidde, pp. commanded, B 440 
(where Aan bidde = have bidden) ; Bede, 
//. bidden {as if frotn Bede), 3. 194; 
I pt. s. subj. would seek, R. 791 ; Bid, 
imp. s. pray, T. iii. 342 ; bid, 3. 144 ; Bid- 
deth, imp.pl. pray, T. i. 36. 

Bidding-, s. request, L. 837. 

Bidelve, v. ; Bidolven, pp. buried, B 5. p 
I. 51. 

Biden, pp. of Byde. 

Bifallinge, s. coming to pass, T. iv. 
1018. 

Biforen, prep, before, B 3553 ; in front of, 
G680. 

Biforen, adv. in the front part (of his 
head), A 1376; beforehand, A 1148; in 
front, A 590; in a good position, A 572; 
of old time, F 551 ; first, E 446. 

Biforn, prep, before, 

Big-ete, v. beget ; Begat, pt. s. L. 1562 ; 
Bigeten,//. B 3138. 

Big'inne, v. begin, A 42; Bigonne, -zpt. s. 
G 442 ; Began, 2 pt. s. {false form for 
Bigunne), L. 2230; Bigan, pt. s. A 44; 
Bigonne, pt.pl. F 1015 ; Bigonne, pp. T. 
n. 779. 

Bigoon, pp. ornamented, R. 943 ; wel b., 
well contented, joyous, merry, 5. 171 ; 
fortunate, T. ii. 294 ; wel bigo, well con- 
tent, R. 693 ; wo b., distressed, L. 1487, 
2497; sorwfully b., distressed, T. i. 114; 
7vers b., more wretched, T. v. 1328. 

Bigyleres, pi. beguilers, I 299. 

Bihalve, s. dat. behalf, T. ii. 1458. 

Bihate, v. hate ; pp. B 3. m 4. 6. 

Biheste, s. promise, B 37; command, T. 
''• 359 1 P^- promises, i. e. all that they 
profess to prove, A. pr. 26. 

Bihete, i pr. s. promise, G 707; 2 pr. s. 
dost promise, B 4. p 2. 1 ; pr. s. promises, 
I 379. See Bihote. 

Bihetinge, s. promising, B 2. p 8. 16. 

Bihewe, v.\ Behewe, pp. carved, HF. 
1306. 

Biliighte, pt. s. promised, T. v. 1204; 



Bihighte, //.//. T, iii. 319; Bihight, pp. 
r. V. 354. See Bihote. 
Biholde, v. behold, A 2293 ; Behelde, v. 
behold, 7. 80; Behelde,^/. s. subj. should 
see, T. ii. 378; Biholde,//. beheld, G , 

179- , 

Bihote, ipr.s. promise, A 1854; Behetfe, 

pt. s. 5. 436. 
Bihove, s. dat. profit (lit. behoof), R. 1092. 
Bihove, v. suit, 13. 5; pr. s. (it) behoves, 

T. iv. 1004 ; pr. pi. are necessary, I 83. 
Bihovely, adj. helpful, T. ii. 261 ; needful, 

I 107. 
Bi-jape, v. ; //. jested at, tricked, T. i. 

531- 

Biker, s. quarrel, L. 2661. 

Biknowe, v. acknowledge, B 886 ; Bikno- 
weth, //-. s. I 481 ; Beknew, pt. s. con- 
fessed, L. 1058 ; I am bi-knowen = I ac- 
knowledge, B 3. p 10. 88. 

Bilde,^^;-. to build, HF. 1133; Bilt, pr. s. 
HF. 1135; Bilt,//. I. 183. See Bulde. 

Bilder, s. as adj. builder, used for build- 
ing, 5. 176. 

Bileve, s. faith, L. 2109; creed, A 3456. 

Bileve (i), v. believe; imp.pl. G 1047. 

Bileve (2), v. to remain, stay behind, F 

583- 
Bihnne, v. cease, T. iii. 1365. 
Bille, J-. bill, petition, i. 59,110; letter, E 

1937 ; writ, D 1586. 
Binde, v. bind, enthral, 4. 249; Bynt 

{for ^\x\X),pr. s. binds, 4. 47, 48; Bond,, 

//. -f. bound, fastened, R. 241 ; Bounden^.. 

pp. bound, B 270; bound up, D 68r. 
Binding", s. constraint, A 1304. 
Binime, v. take away, B 4. p 3. 36; 

Binemen,/n//. B 3. p 3. 65 ; Bi-nomen, 

pp. taken away, B 3. p 3. 69. 
! Binne, s. bin, chest, A 593. 
! Biquethe, v. bequeath, D 1121. 
! Biraft, -e; see Bireve. 
Bireine, v.\ Bireyned, //. rained upon, 

T. iv. 1172. 
Bireve, v. bereave, B 3359; restrain, T. i, 

685 ; take away, G 482 ; me wo bereve, rob 

me of woe, 6. 12 ; Bireved, //. s. bereft, 

D 2071 ; Birafte, //. j. B 83 ; Biraft, //. 

bereft, T. iv. 225 ; A 1361. 
Birthe, s. birth, B 192. 
Biscorned, //. scorned, I 278. 
Bisege, v. besiege;//-, s. L. 1902; Bise- 

gede, pt. pi. T. i. 149. 
Bis6ken, v. beseech, pray, B 2306, 2910; 

By-seke, v. beseech, T. iv. 131 ; Biseken, 

I pr. pi. implore, A 918 ; Bisoughtest, 2 

//. s. didst beseech, T. v. 1734 ; Bisoghte, 

//. s. B 2164. 



14 



i^lossarial Intiex. 



Bisemare, s. contemptuous conduct, A 

3965. 

Bisette, v. ; Besette, v. employ, L. 1069 ; 
bestow, 3. 772 ; Besette, disposed of, L. 
2558 ; used up, D 1952 ; bestowed, A 3715, 
established, A 3012 ; fixed, I 366; Beset, 
/>/>. bestowed, T. i. 521. 

Biseye, pp. beseen ; zael b., fair to see, 
good-looking, R. 821 ; well provided. 3. 
829; goodly b., fair to see, good in ap- 
pearance, T. ii. 1262; yvel b., ill-looking, 
E 965 ; richely b., rich-looking, splendid, 
E984. 

Bishende, v. ; Beshende, v. bring to ruin, 
L. 2696. 

Bishitte, v.; Bishet, //, shut up, T. ill. 
602. 

Bishrewe, i pr, s. beshrew, D 844. 

Bisie, V. rejl. take pains, B 3034 ; Bisie me, 
employ myself, G 758 ; pt. pi. occupied 
themselves, 5. 192. 

Bisily, adv. diligently, A. ii. 38. 8 ; com- 
pletely, T. iii. 1153; eagerly, F 1051; 
well, 2. 33. 

Bisinesse, s. business, B 1415 ; busy en- 
deavour, A 1007, G 24 ; diligence, 3. 1156 ; 
C56; industry, G5; labour, 5. 86; work, 
activity, T, i. 795 ; trouble, ado, 7. 99 ; 
careful attention, B 2979; attentiveness, 
7. 250 ; care, A 520. 

Bi-smokede, adj. pi. dirtied with smoke, 
B I. p I. 31. 

Bismotered, pp. besmutted, marked with 
spots of rust, (ic, A 76. 

Bispet, pp. spit upon, I 276. 

Bisprenge, J/, ; Bespreynt, //. sprinkled, 
bedewed, 2. 10. 

Bistad, //. bestead, in trouble, R. 1227; 
hard b., greatly imperilled, B 649. 

Bistryden, v. ; Bistrood, pt. s. bestrode, 
B 2093. 

Bisy, Besy, adj. busy, industrious, R. 
1052; active, L. 103; useful, I 474; 
attentive, F 509 ; anxious, 2. 2. 

Bisyde,/r.?/. beside; ther b., beside that 
place, 3, 1316; ofb.,ixoYi\ the neighbour- 
hood of, A 445 ; b. his leve, without his 
leave, HF. 2105. 

Bisydes, /;-<?;>. / him b., near him, A 402. 

Bisydes, Besydes, adv. on one side, G 
1416. 

Bit, pr. s. of B'ldde. 

Bitake, i pr. s. commend, 1 1043 ; commit, 
E 161 ; resign, A 3750 ; i pr. s. deliver, 
entrust, L. 2297; Bitook,//. s. entrusted, 
G 541 ; Bitaken, pp. B 3, m 2. 47. 

Biteche, i pr. s. commit (to), consign 
(to), B 2114. 



Bithinke, v. imagine, think of, T. iii. 

1694; Bethinke, v. 2. 107; ger. to reflect, 

HF. 1176; Bithoughte, i pi. s. refl. be- 
thought myself, R. 521 ; I am bitliought, 

I have thought (of), A 767; Bithought, 

pp. T. ii. 225. 
Bitid, Bitit ; see Bityde. 
Bitook ; see Bitake. 
Bitore, ^. bittern, D 972. 
Bitraise, Bitraisshe, v. betray; Bitray- 

seth, pr. s. C 92; pp. betrayed, T. iv. 

1648 ; I 269 ; Bitraisshed, R. 1648 ; Bi- 

trasshed, R. 1520. 
Bitrenden, v.\ Bi-trent, /r. s. encircles, 

goes round, T. iv. 870 ; twines round, T. 

iii. 1231. 
Bit"wixen,/>r^/i. between, A 880; Betwixen, 

5. 148 ; Bitwixe, A 277 ; Bitwix, L. 729. 
Bityde, Bityden, v. happen, T. ii. 623 ; 

arrive, B 3730 ; pr. s. subj. E 306 ; Bityde 

what b., happen what may, T. v. 750; 

Bitit, /r. $. betides, happens, T. ii. 48, v. 

345 ; Bitidde, pt. s. befell, T. v. 1641 ; 

Bitid, pp. T. iii. 288 ; Betid, HF. 384. 
Bitydingre, s. an event, B 5. p i. 37. 
Bitymes, adv. betimes, soon, G 1008. 
Biware, v.\ Biwared./i/. spent, expended, 

laid out (as on wares), T. i. 636. 
Biwepe, ger. to bemoan, T. i. 763 ; Bi- 

wopen,/'/'. bathed in tears, T. iv. 916. 
Biwreye, v. make manifest, reveal, T. iii. 

377 ; Biwreyest, 2 pr. s. revealest, B 773 ; 

Biwreyd, //. betrayed (viz. by having 

your words revealed), H 352. 
Bi'wreying', s. betraying, B 2330. 
Bi-wryen, v. disclose, reveal, T. ii. 537 ; 

Bewrye, betray, 5. 348. (Wrongly used 

for Biwreye.) 
Blak, adj. black, A 294 ; Blake, //. A 557 ; 

Blakke, def. HF. 1801. 
Blak, s. black clothing, 3. 445. 
Blake, j-. black writing, ink, T. ii. 1320. 
Blakeberied, a, a-blackberrying, i. e. 

a-wandering at will, astray, C 406. 
Blaked, pp. blackened, rendered black, 

B 3321. 
Blandishe, pr. s. subj. fawn, I 376. 
Blankmanger, s. a compound of minced 

capon with cream, sugar, and flour, A 

387. Named from its white colour. 
Blasen, ger. to blow, HF. 1802. 
Blaspheme, s. blaspheming, 16. 15. 
Bldsphemdur, s. blasphemer, C 898. 
Blast, s. puff, T. ii. 1387. 
Blaste, ger, to blow a trumpet, HF. 1866. 
Blaunche, adj./em.\\\\\x& (see Fevere), 

T. i. 916. 
Blaundisshing-e, pret. pt. as adj. be- 



i^lossarial Eutiex. 



15 



witching, B 3. m 12. 23 ; Blaundissinge, 

flattering, B 2. p i. 31. 
Bleche, v. ; pp. bleached, 9. 45. 
Blede, v. bleed, L. 2696; Bledde, //. s. 

bled, T, ii. 950. 
Blemislied, pp. injured, B i. p 4. 312. 
Blende, v. blind, T. iv. 648 ; ger. to de- 
ceive, T. iii. 207 ; to blind {or read to- 

blende, v. blind utterly), T. ii. 1496; 

Blent, /r. s. blinds, 5. 600; Blente, />/. J. 

blinded, T. v. 1194; Blent, pp. 15. 18; 

deceived, E 2113. 
Blere, v. blear, bedim ; Blere hir ye, dim 

their eye, cajole them, A 4049; pp. de- 
ceived, G 730. 
Blering", s. dimming; bl. ofa7iye, cajoling, 

A 3865. 
Blesse, v. bless ; Blesseth hir, /;■, s. crosses 

herself, B 449. 
Bleve, V. remain, T. iv. 1484; remain (at 

home),T. iii. 623;^^;-. to dwell, T. iv. 1357. 
Ble-w, pt. s. of Blowe. 
Blew, adj. blue, A 564; 3. 340; as s. blue 

cloihing, 21. 7. 
Bleyne, s. blain, blemish, R. 553. 
Bleynte,//. J. blenched, started back, A 

1078 ; turned aside, T. iii. 1346. Pt. s. of 

Blenche, v. 
Blinde, v.\ Blynde with, ger. to blind 

(the priest) with, G 1151. 
Blinne, v. leave off, cease, G 1171. 
Blisful, adj. happy, 9. i ; conferring bliss, 

I. 24; blessed, 3. 854; merry, R. 80; 

sainted, A 17, 
Blisful, adv. joyously, 5. 689. 
BlisfuUy, adv. happily, A 1236. 
Blisfulnesse, s. happiness, B 2. p 4. 75. 
Blisse, V. bless, E 553. Perhaps read 

blesse, kesse. See Blesse, 
Blissed, pp. happy, 9, 43. 
Bio, adj. blue, smoke-coloured, HF. 1647. 
Blody, adj. causing bloodshed, A 2512. 
Blondren; see Blundre. 
Blood, s. lineage, 7. 65; offspring, E 632; 

kinswoman, T. ii. 594. 
Blosme, s. blossom, A 3324. 
Blosme, v. blossom ; pr. s. E 1462 ; //. 

covered with blossoms, R. 108. 
Blosmy, adj. blossoming, T. ii. 821 ; full 

of buds, 5. 183. 
Blowe, V. blow, A 565 ; Blew, pt. s. 3. 182 ; 

(it) blew, T. iii. 678; Blowen, pp. pro- 
claimed by trumpets, A 2241. 
Blundre, v. ; pr. s. runs heedlessly, G 

1414 ; I p. pi. pr. Blondren, we become 

mazed, G 670. 
Blythly, adv. gladly, 3. 749, 755. 
Bly ve, adv. quickly, soon, L. 60 ; as bl., 



very soon, as soon as possible, T. i. 965 ; 

forthwith, R. 706, 992 ; also bl., as soon 

as possible, T. iv. 174. 
Bobance, s. presumption, boast, D 569. 
Boce, s. protuberance (boss), I 423. 
Boch, s. botch, pustule, B 3. p 4. 14. 
Bocher, s. butcher, A 2025. 
Bocler, s. buckler, A 3266. 
Bode (i), s. foreboding, omen, 5. 343. 
Bode (2), s. abiding, delay, 7. 119. 
Bode, V. proclaim ; pr. s. heralds, B 4. 

m 6. 17. 
Boden, pp. of Bede. 

Body, s. person, F 1005 ; priticipal sub- 
ject, E 42; corpse, 3. 142; B 1872; 7ny 

b., myself, B 1185; pi. metallic bodies 

(metals), answering to celestial bodies 

(planets), G 820, 825. 
Boef, s. beef, E 1420. 

Boes,?:'r..f. (it) behoves, A 4026. (Northern.) 
Bog-ht, Bog-hte; see Bye. 
Bolst, s. box, C 307 ; pi. HF. 2129. 
Boistous. adj. rude, plain, H 211. 
Boistously, adv. loudlv, E 791. 
Bokel, s. buckle, R. 1086. 
Bokeler, j. buckler, A 112. A small round 

shield usually carried by a handle at the 

back. See Bocler. 
Bokeling-e, pres.pt. buckling, A 2503. 
Bokes, pi. books, A 294. 
Boket, s. bucket, A 1533. 
Bolas, pi. bullace-pUims, bullaces, R, 1377. 
Bolde, V. grow bold, 5. 144. 
Bole, s. bull, T. iii. 723, iv. 239. 
Bole armoniak, Armenian clay, G 790. 
Bolle, s. a bowl, G 12 10. 
Bolt, s. crossbow-bolt, A 3264. 
Bolt-upright, on (her) back, A 4266, B 

1506. 
Bomble, v.; pr. s. booms (as a bittern), 

D 972. 
Bon, adj. good, HF. 1022. 
Bond, J. bond, obligation, A 1604; band, 

fetter, T. iii. 1766; obligation (compelling 

the service of spirits), F 131. 
Bonde, s. bondman, D 1660, I 149. 
Bonde-folk, s.pl. bondmen, I 754. 
Bonde-men, s. pi. bondmen, 1 752. 
B6ne, s. petition, boon, prayer, request, 

3. 129, 835. 
Bood, pt. s. of Byde. 
Boon, i-. bone, R, 1059; ivory, T. ii. 926; 

Bones, pi. bones, A 546. 
B66r, s. boar, A 2070; Bores, gen. slug. 

boar's, B 2060; Bores,//. A 1658. 
Boost, s. loud talk, A 4001 ; boast, L. 

267 ; pride, B 3289 ; boasting, C 764 ; 

swelling, G 441. 



i6 



(^lossarial 3IntJei. 



Boot, s. boat, T. i. 416, ii. 3. 

B66t, s. help, remedy, T. iii. 1208. 

Boot, //". s. of Byte. 

Boras, s. borax, A 630, G 790. 

Bord, s. table, A 52, B 430; plank, 3. 74; 
board, i. e. meals, G 1017 ; to b., to 
board, A 3188, D 528; into shlppes bord, 
on board the ship, A 3585 ; over-bord, 
overboard, B 922. 

Bordels, s. pi. brothels, I 885. 

Bordel-women,//. women of the brothel, 
I 976 

Bordure, s. border, raised rim on the 
front of an astrolabe, A. i. 4. 4. 

Bore, s. bore, hole, T. iii. 1453. 

Bore, Boren,//. of Bere. 

Borel, s. coarse woollen clothes, D 356; 
Borel men, laymen, B 3145. See Burel. 

Bores ; see Boor. 

Borken, pp. of Berke. 

Borne, v, ; Borneth, pr. s. burnishes, 
smoothes, T. i. 327. 

Borwe, s. pledge, A 1622 ; to b., in pledge, 
as a pledge, T. v. 1664; teyd to b., laid 
in pledge, pawned, T. ii. 963 ; to b., for 
surety, 4. 205 ; Venus here to b., Venus 
being your pledge, T. ii. 1524. 

Borwe, v. borrow, B 105. 

Bos, s. boss, A 3266. See Boce. 

Bost, s. ; see Boost. 

Boste, V. boast; pr. s. D 1672. 

B6te, s. good, benefit, D 472; remedy, 
profit, 3. 38 ; advantage, T. i. 352 ; heal- 
ing, T. i. 763 ; help, T. ii. 345 ; healer, 
22. 45 ; relief, G 148 1 ; salvation, B 1656 ; 
dotk b., gives the remedy for, 5. 276; 
for b. ne bale, for good nor for ill, 3. 
227. 

Botel, s. bottle (of hay), H 14. 

Botelees, adj. without remedy, T. i. 782. 

Boteler, s. butler, HF. 592. 

Boterflye, s. butterfly, B 3980. 

Botes, pi. boots, A 203, 273. 

Bothe, both, A 540; your bothes, of both 
of you, I. 83; your bother, of vou both, 
T. iv. 168. 

Botmelees, adj. bottomless, unreal, T. v. 

1431- 
Boug-h, s. bough, R. 1403; Bowes, ;z>/. R. 

108. 
Boug-ht, Boug-hte; see Bye. 
Bouk, s. trunk of the body, A 2746. 
Boun, adj. prepared, F 1503. 
Bounde, s. bound ; //. bounds, limits, 

L. 546, 1673. 
Bountee, s. goodness, kindness, i. 9; 

good deed, I 393; delightfulness, R. 

1444. 



Bountevous, adj. bountiful, bounteous, 

T. i. 883; C no. 
Bour, s. bed-chamber, HF. 1186; B 1932; 

lady's chamber, R. 1014; inner room, 

B 4022. 
Bourde, j. jest, H 81 ; pi. D 680. 
Bourde, i pr. s. jest, C 778 ; pp. 5. 589. 
Box (i), s. box-tree, A 2922; boxwood, L. 

866; money-box, A 4390; box, C 869. 
Box (2), s. blow, L. 1388. 
Boydekin, s. dagger, A 3960. 
Bracer, 5. bracer, a guard for the arm 

in archery, A in. 
Bragot, s. a beverage made of honey and 

ale, A 3261. 
Braid, s. quick movement ; at a b., in a 

moment, R. 1336; Brayd, a start, L. 

1 166. 
Brak, pt. s. of Breke. 
Brasil, s. dye made from a certain dye- 
wood, B 4649. 
Brast, Braste ; see Breste. 
Braun, s. muscle, A 546; brawn (of the 

boar), F 1254. 
Braunche, s. branch, T. v. 844. 
Brayd, Brayde; see Breyde. 
Brede {i),s. breadth, R. 825, 1124; space, 

T. i. 179; on brede, abroad, T. i. 

53°- 

Brede (2), s. roast meat, HF. 1222. 

Brede, _^^;-. to breed, T. iii. 1546; grow, 
T. V. 1027 ; Breden, ger. to breed, arise, 
L. 1 156 (cf. Vergil, ^n. iv. 2) ; Bred,//, 
bred up, F 499, 

Breech, s. breeches, B 2049, C 948. 

Breem, s. bream, a fish, A 350. 

Breke. v. break, A 551, C 936; br. his 
day, fail to pay on the day, G 1040; 
ger. to interrupt, B 2233; Brak, //. s. 
3. 71 ; Breke, pr. s. subj. 4. 242 ; Breke, 
2 pr. pi. subj. break off, T, v. 1032 ; Breke, 
//. s. subj. would break, B 4578 ; Broke, 
pp. broken, A 3571; Broken,//, ship- 
wrecked, L. 1487. 

Brekke, s. break, flaw, defect, 3. 940. 

Bremble-flour, s. flower of the bramble, 
B 1936. 

Breme, adj. furious, T. iv. 184. 

Breme, adv. furiously, A 1699. 

Bren, s. bran, A 4053. 

Brenne, v. burn, 17. 18; to be burnt, 
T. i. 91; Brinne, ger. to burn, D 52; 
Brendest, 7. pt. s. didst burn, A 2384; 
Brende, //. s. i. 90; was burnt, HF. 
163; was set on fire, HF. 537; Brenned, 
pt. s. was inflamed with anger, R. 297 ; 
Brende, //.//. caught fire, HF. 954; 
Brente,//. //. L. 731; Brent,//. 7. 115; 



(©lossarial Untiex. 



17 



Brend, //. B 4555 ; as adj. bright, R. 
1 109. 

Brenning", s. burning, 4, 133 ; greed of 
gold, R. 188. 

Brenningly, adv. ardently, T. i. 607 ; fer- 
vently, A 1564. 

Brere, J-. briar, R. 858; Breres, //. under- 
wood, A 1532. 

Brest, s. breast, A 115, 131. 

Brest-boon, s. breast-bone, A 2710. 

Breste, v. burst, T. v. 1008; afflict, T. 
iii. 1434; break, D 1103; Brest, _pr. s. 
bursts, A 2610 ; breaks, T. i. 258 ; Brast, 
//. s. burst out, T. v. 1078 ; burst, L. 
1033; broke, 3. 1193; Brast,//. s. burst 
(or read braste = would burst), T. v. 
180 ; Braste, //. pi. burst, T. ii. 326 ; 
Broste, pt. pi. B 671, C 234; Brosten, 
pt. pi. 4. 96 ; Braste, pt. s. subj. would 
burst, T. ii. 1108; Brosten, pp. burst, 
T. ii. 976; broken, L. 1300. 

Bresting-, s. bursting, F 973. 

Bretful, adj. brimful, A 687, 2164. 

Bretherhed, s. brotherhood, religious 
order, A 511. 

Brew, pt. s. contrived, B 3575. 

Breyde, ger. to start, T. iv. 230,348; v. 
awake, F 477 ; Breyde, i pr. s. start, T. 
V. 1262 ; Breyde, i pt. s. awoke, D 799 ; 
Breyde, pt. s. started, T. v. 1243 '< went 
(out of his wits) , B 3728 ; drew, B 837 ; 
Brayde, //. s. took hastily, HF. 1678; 
Brayd, pp. started, gone suddenly, 7. 
124. 

Brid, s. bird, HF. 1003; yovmg of birds, 
5. 192. 

Brige, s. contention, B 2873. F- b^'igi^e. 

Brigge, s. bridge, A 3922. 

Bright, adj. fair, R. loog. 

Brighte, adj. as s. brightness (after y^r), 
T. ii. 864. 

Brike, s. a trap, snare, ' fix,' dilemma, 
B 3580. 

Bringe, v. bring ; Bringes, 2 pr. s. bring- 
est, HF. 1908 (a Northern form) ; 
Broghten, //. pi. B 2590; made broght, 
caused to be brought, HF. 155. 

Brinne,^^/-. to burn, D 52. See Brenne. 

Brocage, s. mediation, A 3375. 

Broche, J-, brooch, R. 1193; small orna- 
ment, bracelet, 4. 245. 

Brode, adv. broadly, plainly, A 739; far 
and wide, HF. 1683; wide awake, G 
1420. 

Brodere, adj. larger, A. ii. 38. i. 

Brok, i. e. Badger, a horse's name, D 

1543- 
Broken ; see Harm. And see Breke. 



Brokkinge, pres. pt. using a quavering 
voice, A 3377. 

Bromes, //. broom (bushes so called), 
HF. 1226. 

Brond, s. torch, L. 2252; firebrand, B 
3224 ; Bronde, dat. piece of burning 
wood, B 2095. 

Brood, adj. broad, A 155, 471 ; thick, 
large, F 82 ; Brode, //. R. 939 ; ex- 
panded, R. 1681. 

Broste, -en; see Breste. 

Brotel, adj^ brittle, frail, T. iii. 820; 
fickle, L. 1885 ; unsafe, insecure, E 1279; 
transitory, E 2061 ; Brutel, B 2. p 5. 6. 

Brotelne'sse, s. frailty, T. v. 1832 ; inse- 
curity, E 1279 ; fickleness, 10. 63. 

Brotherhede, s. brotherhood, D 1399. 

Brouded, pp. embroidered, A 3238, B 

3659- 
Brouke, v. enjoy, use, B 4490; keep, E 

2308; \pr. s. subj. {optative), may have 

the use of, HF. 273 ; Brouken, pr. pi. 

subj. {opt.), may (they) profit by, L. 194. 
Browding-, s. embroidery, A 2498. 
Broyded,//. braided, A 1049. 
Brutel ; see Brotel. 
Brybe, v. steal, filch, A 4417; rob, D 

1378. 
Bryberyes, pi. ways of robbing, D 1367. 
Brydale, s. wedding, A 4375. 
Brydel, s. bridle, 7. 184. 
Brydeleth, pr. s. controls, 4. 41. 
Buffet, s. blow; Buffettes, //. I 258. 
Bugle-horn, s. drinking-horn made from 

the ' bugle ' or ox, F 1253. 
Buk, s. buck, 5. 195 ; Bukke, B 1946 ; 

Bukkes, geit. buck's, A 3387. 
Bulde, v. build; Bulte, pt. s. built, A 

1548. 
Bulle, s. papal bull, C 909. 
Bulte, pt. s. of Bulde. 
Bulte, V. boult, sift, B 4430. 
Burdoun, s. burden of a song, bass- 
accompaniment, A 673. 
Burel, adj. rough, unlettered, F 716 ; lay 

(people), D 1872, 1874. The idea is that 

of a man dressed in burel, or coarse 

woollen cloth. See Borel. 
Buriels, s. pi. burial-places, i. e. the 

catacombs, G 186. 
Burne, v. burnish; pp. A 1983; polished, 

HF. 1387; lustrous, C 38. See Borne. 
Burnet, adj. made of coarse brown cloth. 

R. 226. 
Busk, s. bush, R. 54 ; pi. A 1579. 
But, conj. except, unless, 2. 82; 3. 117. 
But, as s. an exception, a ' but,' I 494, 
But and, but if, L. 1790. 



c c 



i8 



i^lossavial hxtstx. 



But-if, co/fj. unless, R. 250. 

Buxom, cidj. yielding, 6. 125; obedient, 

B 1287. 
Buxomly, adv. obediently, E 186. 
Buxumnesse, s. submission, 13. 15. 
By, prep, by, A 25, &c. ; as regards, with 

respect to, concerning, 6. 126 ; with 

reference to, 5. 4 ; for, on account of, 

R. 844 ; dy proces, in process, B 2665 ; 

by me, beside me {with accent on by), T. 

ii. 991 ; by the morwe, in the morning, 

L. 49. 
By, adv. beside ; faste by, close at hand, 

R. 1274. 
By and by, adv. one after another, in 

due order, in due place, L. 304, A ion. 
Byde, i-. wait, T, i. 1067; A 1576; Bood, 

pt. s. waited, T. v, 29 ; Biden, pp. stayed, 

E 1888. 
Bye, V. buy, pay for (it), D 167 ; go by, let 

us go to buy, G 1294 ; Bye, pr. pi. suhj. 

18, 26; Boghte, /A s. bought, A 2088; 

redeemed, E 1153; b. agayn, redeemed, 

C 776. 
Byhig-ht, pp. promised, T. v. 1104. 
Bying, s. buying, A 569. 
By-japed, pp. tricked, made a jest of, T. 

V. 1119. 
Bynt him, binds himself, 4. 47; Bynt 

her, 4. 48. 
By-path, s. by-way, T. iii. 1705. 
Byrde, s. maiden, lady, R. 1014. 
By-seke, v. beseech, T. iv. 131. 
Byte, V. bite, T. iii. 737 ; cut deeply, F 

158; burn, A 631; Boot, pt. s. bit, B 

3791 ; Biten, pp. bitten, L. 2318. 
Bytinge, s. wound, B 3. m 7. 7. 
By-"WOrd, s. proverb, T. iv. 769. 
By-wreye, v. reveal, T. iii. 367. 

O. 

Caas, s. circumstance, I 105 ; sette caas 

= suppose, A. ii. 42. 24; Caas,//. cases 

of law, A 323. 
Cacche, v. catch, G 11; lay hold of, 3. 

969; come by, HF. 404; Caughte,/)/. s. 

took, conceived, E 619; took, A 498; 

pulled, L. 1854; Caught, pp. obtained, 

E mo; taken, F 740. 
Caitif, adj. captive, miserable, wretched, 

A 1552. 
Caitif, s. wretch, R. 340; //. captives, 

A 924. 
Cake, s. a round and rather flat loaf of 

bread (in the shape of a large bun), 

A 668, 4094, C 322. 
Calceninff , s. calcination, G 771. 



Calcinacioun, s. calcination, G 804. 
Calcule, V. calculate; Calculed, pf. s. F 

1284. 
Calculer, s. the calculator or pointer, A 

i. 23. 2. See Almury. 
Calculinge, s. calculation, T. i. 71. 
Calendes, pi. kalends, introduction to 

a new time, T. ii. 7. 
Calle, s. caul, a net used to confine 

women's hair, A. i. 19. 4; headdress, 

D 1018 ; to ' make a hood above a caul ' 

= to befool, T. iii. 775. 
Camaille, s. a camel, E 1196. 
Caraiuse, adj. low and concave, A 3934, 

3974- 

Can, I pr. s. know, L. 1987 ; know how, 
am able, E 304, F 4; can, B 42; under- 
stand, F 1266; am able to say, 5. 14; 
pr. s. knows, 3. 673 ; has, E 2245 ; knows 
(of), A 1780; has skill, T. ii. 1197; can 
on, has knowledge of, F 786; can hir 
good, knows her own advantage, D 231 ; 
can thanA, owes (them) thanks, A 1818; 
'2pr.pl. know, B 1169. 

Canel-boon, s. collar-bone (lit. channel- 
bone, with reference to the depression 
in the neck behind the collar-bone), 

3- 943- 
Canelle, s. cinnamon, R. 1370. 
Cankedort, s. state of suspense, critical 

position, T. ii. 1752. 
Canon, s. the ' Canon,' the title of a book 

by Avicenna, C 890; rule, explanation, 

A. pr. 105. 
Canstow, 2. p. s. pr. knowest thou, A. pr. 

20; canst thou, T. iv. 460. 
Cantel, s. portion, A 3008. 
Cape, ger. gape after, T. v. 1133. See 

Gape. 
Capel, s. horse, nag, H 64 ; cart-horse, 

D 2150. 
Cappe, s. cap, A 586; set the wrightes 

cappe, i. e. made a fool of him, A 3143. 
Carboucle, s. carbuncle-stone, R. 1120. 
Cardiacle, s. pain about the heart, C 313. 
Care, s. anxiety, sorrow, grief, trouble, 7. 

63; T. i. 505, 587; ill-luck, 5. 363; //. 

miseries, T. i. 264. 
Care, v. feel anxiety, E 1212 ; Care thee, 

imp. s. be anxious, A 3298. 
Careful, adj. full of trouble, 6. 44, 133 ; 

sorrowful, A 1565. 
Careyne, s. corpse, carcase, 5. 177. 
Carf, cut; see Kerve. 
Cariagre, s. a carrying away ; upo7i c, in 

the way of carrying anything away, 

1. e. that I can carry away, D 1570; 

Cariages, s.pl. tolls due from the tenant 



#lo0giarial Kntiex. 



19 



to his feudal lord imposed by authority, 

I 752. 
Carl, s. man, A 3469; rustic, countryman, 

A 545- 

Cdrole, s. a dance accompanied with 
singing, R. 744, 781, 793. 

Carole, v. dance round singing, 3. 849 ; 
/>/>. danced, R. 810. 

Carpe, v. talk, discourse, A 474. 

Carrik, s. barge, D 1688. 

Cart, -f. chariot, HF. 943. 

Cartere, s. charioteer, B 5. p 4. 100. 

Cart-hors, />/. chariot-horses, HF. 944. 

Cas, J. accident, chance, HF\ 254, 1052; 
affair, L, 409; occasion, B 36; adven- 
ture, L. 1630; mischance, L. 1056; in 
cas that, in case, A. ii. 3. 2; upon cas, by 
chance, A 3661 ; m cas if that, in case 
that, T. ii. 758 ; in no maner cas, in no 
way, D 1831 ; set a cas, suppose that, T. 
ii. 729; to deyen in the cas, though 
death were the result, E 859. 

Cast, s. occasion, turn, B 3477; contri- 
vance, plan, HF. 1178. 

Caste, V. cast (accounts), B 1406; Casten, 
V. throw, T. ii. 513; c. with a spere, 
throw with a spear, HF, 1048; fling, 
A 3330; contrive, HF. 1170; Caste, i 
pr. s. conjecture, A 2172 ; Casteth, pr. s. 
casts about, I 692; considers, G 1414; 
applies, B 2781 ; ref. devotes himself, 
G 738 ; Cast, pr. s. casts, R. 1574; Caste, 
I pt. s. threw, 5. 172; Casten,//. thrown, 
B 1796 ; Cast, pp. overthrown, T. ii. 
1389 ; contrived, B 3891 ; c. biforn, pre- 
meditated, I 543. 

Castelled. adj. castellated, I 445. 

Castel-yate, castle-gate, HF. 1294. 

Catapuce, s, caper-spurge {^Euphorbia 
Lathyris), B 4155. 

Catel, s. property, wealth, possessions, 
goods, A 373, 540. 

Cause, J. cause, 1.26; A 419; reason, T. 
V. 527 ; plea, 2. 46 ; Cause causinge, 
first cause, T. iv. 829; by the c. that, 
because, A 2488 ; by that c, because, 
T. iv. 99; Cause why, the reason why, 
T. iii. 795 ; the reason for it (was) , A 
4144. 

Causeles, adv. without cause, F 825. 

Cave, s. cave, HF. 70; used to translate 
the astrological term ' puteus,' 4. 119. 

Cavillacloun, s. cavilling, D 2136. 

Celebrable, adj. celebrated, B 4. m 7. 30. 

Celerer, s. keeper of a cellar, B 3126. 

Celle, s. cell, A 172, 1376. 

Centaure, s. centaury. Centaur ea nigra, 
B4IS3- 



Centre, s. a point on a rete representing 
a star, A. i. 21. 12. 

Ceptre, s. sceptre, B 3334, 3563. 

Cercle. s. HF. 791 ; sphere, i6. 9. 

Cerclen, ger. to encircle, T. iii. 1767 ; pr. s. 
R. 1619. 

Cered, //. as adj. waxed, G 808. 

Cerial, adj. belonging to a species of 
oak, the Qtiercus cerris, A 2290. 

Ceriously, adv. minutely, with full 
details, B 185. Ducange has ' Seriose, 
fuse, minutatim, articulatim.' From 
Lat. series, order. 

Certein, adj. sure; Certeins, pi. certain, 
B 5. p 5. 115; c.gold, a stated sum of 
money, B 242; c. tresor, a quantity of 
treasure, B 442 ; c. yeres, a certain 
number of years, B 3367; Certeyn, a 
certain sum, a fixed quantity, G 776. 

Certein, adv. certainly, indeed, assuredly, 

A 375- 

Certes, adv. certainly, R. 374, 439. 

Ceruce, s. white lead, A 630. 

Cese, v. cause to cease, T. i. 445 ; put an 
end to, 4. II. See Cesse. 

Cesse, V. cease, B 1066; c. cause, when 
the cause ceases, T. ii. 483 ; c. wind, when 
the wind ceases, T. ii. 1388. 

Cetewale, s. setwall, i. e. zedoary, A 3207, 
B 1951. O. F. citoal. A medicinal sub- 
stance obtained in the East Indies, 
having a fragrant smell, and a warm, 
bitter, aromatic taste, used in medicine 
as a stimulant. (The name setwall was 
also given to valerian.) 

Ceynt, s. cincture, girdle, A 3235. 

Chaff are, s. bargaining, I 851 ; traffic, 
G 1421 ; trade, A 4389; merchandise, 
ware, B 1475, D 521 ; matter, subject, 
E 2438. 

Chaffdre, ger. to trade, barter, deal, 
traffic, B 139. 

Chaires, s.pl. thrones, B 4. m 2. 6. 

Chaldnge, v.; pr. s. \p. claim, F 1324; 
Clialaunged, pt. s. arrogated, B 2. p 6. 36. 

Chalanging', s. false claim, accusation, 
C 264. 

Chalaundre, s. a species of lark {Alauda 
calandra), R. 914; //. R. 663. 

Chalice, s. cup, I 879. 

Chalk-stoon, s. a piece of chalk, G 1207. 

Chalons, pi. blankets or coverlets for a 
bed, A 4140. Cf. E. shalloon. 

Chamberere, s. maidservant, lady's maid, 
D 300. 

Chambre-roof, roof of my room, 3. 299. 

Champartye, s. equality, participation 
in power, A 1949. F. champ parti. 



20 



#lassarial 3xnt)£i. 



Chanon, s. canon, G 573. 

Chapeleine, s. chaplain, A 164. 

Chapelet, s. fillet, circlet for the head, 
chaplet, R. 563, 845, 908. 

Chapltre, s. chapter, D 1945. 

Chapman, s. trader, merchant, A 397 ; 
Chapmen,/'/. B 135. 

Chapmanliede, s. bargaining, B 1428 ; 
trade, B 143. 

Char. s. chariot, 7. 24, 39, 40. 

Charbocle, s. carbuncle (a precious 
stone), B 2061. 

Charge, s. load, burden, R. 1352 ; respon- 
sibility, 5. 507; consideration, A 1284; 
importance, 3. 894; care, A 733; par- 
ticular note, D 321 ; a heavy thing, 
HF. 746; weight, L. 620; consequence, 
L. 2383 ; 0/ that no ch., for that no 
matter, it is of no importance, G 749. 

Charge, v. load, L. 2151 ; command, L. 
493; PP- burdened, I 92; bidden, L. 
940. 

Chargeant, adj. burdensome, B 2433. 

Char-hors, pi. chariot-horses, T. v. 1018. 

Charitable, adj. loving, L. 444; kind, A 

143- 
Charitee, s. charity, love, T. i. 49; for 

seinte ch,, i. e. either (i) for holy charity ; 

or (2) for the sake of St. Charity, A 

1721, B 4510, D 2119. 
Charmeresses, fem. pi. workers with 

charms, HF. 1261. 
Chaste, v. to chasten; pp. taught, F 

491. O. F. chastier. See Chastyse. 
Chasteyn, s. chestnut, A 2922. See 

Chesteynes. 
Chdstisinge, s. chastening, i. 129. 
Chastyse, v. to rebuke, restrain, B 3695 ; 

chasten, i, 39. See Chaste. 
Chaunce, s. chance, A 1752; incident, 

3. 1285; destiny, 3. 11 13; luck, G 593; 

' chance,' a technical term in the game 

of hazard, C 653. 
Chaunging, s. change, 21. 17. 
Chaunteth, pr. s. sings, A 3367, E 1850. 
Chaunte-pleure, title of a song upon 

grief following joy, 7. 320. 
Chaunterie, s. an endowment for the 

payment of a priest to sing mass, agree- 
ably to the appointment of the founder, 

A 510. 
Chayer, s. chair, B 3803; throne, B i. 

"1 5- 3- 
Cheef, adj. chief, 3. 910, 911. 
Cheef, s. chief, head, L. 2109. 
Cheek, s. cheek, i. e. cheekbone, B 3228. 
Cheep, s. market, price ; to greet cheep, 

too cheap, D 523 ; as good chep, as 



cheaply, T. iii. 641 ; a time of cheapness. 
HF. 1974. 

Chees; see Chese. 

Cheeste, s. wrangling, I 556. A. S, ceast. 

Chek, s. as int. check (at chess), 3. 659. 

Chekkere, s. chess-board, 3. 660. 

Chekmat. checkmate, T. ii. 754. 

Chelaundre, R. 81; see Chalaundre. 

Chep, -e ; see Cheep. 

Chepe,^,?r. to bargain (with her), D 268. 

Chere, J. face, countenance, T. i. 14; look, 
mien, R. 1014; entertainment, A 747; 
favour, 7. 108 ; appearance, 19. 4 ; be- 
haviour, A 139; look, glance, sign, T. 
i. 312; good cheer, mirth, A 4363; 
kindly greeting, 4. 146; show, B 2377; 
kindly expression, E 1112; doth him 
chere, makes him good cheer, L. 2452 ; 
be 0/ good ch., be of good cheer, T. i. 
879; sory ch., mournful look, D 588; 
Cheres, pi. faces, R. 813; looks, T. ii. 

1507- 
Cherl, s. churl, boor, fellow, 5. 596; L. 

136; slave, I 463; man (in the moon), 

T. i. 1024; pi. violent men, fierce men, 

R. 880. 
Chert6e, s. affection, B 1526. 
Cherubinnes, gen. cherub's, A 624. 
Cheryse, pi. cherries, R. 1376. 
Ches, s. chess, 3. 619, 652, 664. 
Ch6se, V. choose, 5. 399, 400; Cheest, /r. 

s. chooseth, 5. 623; Chees, 1 pt. s. chose, 

3.791; Chees,//. J-, chose, B 3706 ; Chees, 

nnp. s. choose, L. 1449; Cheseth, imp. 

pi. D 1232; Chose,//, chosen, 3. 1004. 
Chesinge, s. choosing, choice, B 2305, E 

162. 
Cheste, s. chest, casket, T. v. 1368; box, 

trunk, L. 510; coffin, D 502. 
Chesteynes, //. chestnuts, R. 1375. 
Chevauchee ; see Chivachee. 
Cheve, v. ; m phr. yvel mote he cheve 

= ill may he end, or ill may he thrive,. 

G 1225. 
Chevesaile, s. (ornamented) collar or 

neckband of a gown, R. 1082. 
Chevisaunce, s. borrowing, L. 2434; 

agreement to borrow, B 1519; dealing 

for profit, A 282. 
Chevise, v. refl. accomplish (her) desire,. 

4. 289. O. F. chevir. 
Chideresse, s. a scold, R. 150, 
Chieftayn, s. captain, A 2555. 
Chiertee, s. fondness, D 396; love, F 

881. 
Chike, s. chicken, R. 541. 
Chiknes, //. chickens, A 380. 
Child, s. young man, A 3325 ; Childes 



(glossarial Entjcx. 



21 



pley, child's play, E 1530; Childe, with, 

with child, L. 1323. 
Childhede, s. childhood, R. 399. 
Childly, adj. childlike, 3. 1095. 
Chilindre, s. cylinder, portable sun-dial, 

B 1396. 
Chimbe, s. rim of the barrel, A 3895. 
Chimbe, v. chime (as a bell), A 3896. 
Chimenee, s. fireplace, A 3776. 
Chinche, s. niggard, miser, B 2793, 2809. 
Chincherye, s. niggardliness, miserli- 
ness, B 2790. 
Ciiirche, s. church, A 708, 2760. 
Chirche-hawe, s. churchyard, I 964; 

/>/. I 801. 
Chirche-reves, />/. church-officers, 

churchwardens, D 1306. 
Chirketh./'r. J. chirps, D 1804; pres.pt. 

rustling, B i. m 6. 10. 
Chirking", s. creaking, grating noises, 

A 2004, I 605;* Chirkinges,/"/. shriekings, 

cries, HF. 1943. 
Chisels, s. scissors, I 418. 
Chit, chides ; pr. s. of Chyde. 
Chiteren, v. chatter, prattle, G 1397. 
Chiteringe, s. chattering, chirping, T. 

ii. 68. 
Chivdchee, s. feat of horsemanship, H 

50; Chevauchee, swift course (lit. ride), 

4. 144. O. F. chevauchee, an expedition 

on horseback, 
Chlvachye, s. a military expedition, A 

85- 

Chivalrye, s. knighthood, the accom- 
plishments of a knight, A 45 ; knightly 
conduct, valour, R. 1207 ; L. 608 ; troops 
of horse, cavalry, company of knights, 
A 878. 

Chogh, s. chough, 5. 345. 

Choppen, v. strike downwards, knock, 
HF. 1824. 

Chose, pp. of Chese. 

Chuk, s. cluck, 'chucking' noise, B 

4364- 
Chukketh, pr. s. clucks, B 4372. 
Chyde, v. chide, T. iii. 1433; complain, 

F650; reproach, T. v. 1093; Chit, ;>r. s. 

chides, scolds, G 921 ; Chidde, i //. s. 

chid, D 223. 
Chydester, s. (female) scold, E 1535. 
Chydinges, //. scoldings, HF. 1028. 
Chyning, adj. gaping, yawning, B i. 

p 6. 41. A. S. c'lnan, to gape open. 
Ciclatoun, s. a costly kind of thin cloth, 

B 1924. 
Cinamome, s. cinnamon, as a term of 

endearment, sweet one, A 3699. 
Cink, num. cinque, five, C 653. 



Cipres, s. cypress, 5. 179; {collectively), 

cypresses, R. 138 1. 
Circumscryve, v. enclose, comprehend, 

T. v. 1865. 
Citole, s. kind of harp, a stringed instru- 
ment, A 1959. 
Citrinacioun, s. citronising, the turning 

to the colour of citron, a process in 

alchemy, G 816. 
Citryn, adj. citron-coloured, A 2167. 
Clamb, pt. s. of Climben. 
Clamour, s. A 995 ; outcry, D 889. 
Claperes, //, burrows (for rabbits), R. 

1405. 
Clappe, s. thunderclap, HF. 1040. 
Clappe, s. prating, foolish talk, A 3144. 
Clappe, V. clap; hence, chatter, prattle, 

G 965 ; pr. s. knocks, D 1581, 1584; pr. 

pi. talk unceasingly, I 406; Clappeth, 

ivip. pi. E 1200; Clapte, //. s. shut 

quickly, A 3740. 
Clapping-, s. chatter, idle talk, E 999, 
Clarioning, s. the music of the clarion, 

HF. 1242. 
Clarioun, s. clarion, trumpet, HF. 1240, 

1573. 1579- 
Clarree, s. clarified wine, wine mixed 

witli honey and spices, and afterwards 

strained till clear, A 1471, E 1807. 
Clasped, pp. fastened, A 273. 
Clatereth, pr. s. says noisily, B 2259 ; 

pt. pi. rattled, A 2423. 
Clateringe, s. clanking, A 2492 ; clashing, 

D 1865. 
Clause, s. sentence; also, agreement, 

stipulation, T. ii. 728 ; in a clause, in a 

short sentence, briefly, 22. 38. 
Clawe, V. rub, D 940; ger. to scratch, T. 

iv. 728; pt. s. stroked, A 4326; Clew, 

I pt. s. rubbed, HF. 1702. 
Cleerly, adv. entirely, B 1566. 
Cleernesse, s. glory, G 403. 
Clefte, pt. s. of Cleve (i), 
Cl^ne, adj. clean, A 504; unmixed, B 

1183. 
C16ne, adv. clean, entirely, wholly, R. 1380. 
Clennesse, s. purity, A 506. 
Clense, v. cleanse, A 631. 
Clepen, v. call, name, A 643. 2730; call 

out, A 3577 ; pr. s. D 102 ; F 382 ; tnen 

cl., people call, E 115; Clepe . . . ayein 

{or again), v. recall, T. ii. 521; pt. s. 

called, F 374; Clepte, pt. s. called, 

R. 133 1 ; summoned, B 2432; Clept, //>. 

named, G 863. 
Clere, a^". clear, R. 681; bright, 3. 340; 

well-sounding, 3.347; noble, pure, HF. 

1575- 



22 



(!llo00arial 3intiei, 



Clere, adv. clearly, A 170 ; L. 139. 
Clere, v. grow clear, T. ii. 2, 806 ; ger. to 
grow bright, T. V. 519; to shine clearly, 

L- 773- 
Clerer, adj. comp. brighter, 3. 822. 
Clergeon, s. a chorister-boy, B 1693. 
Clergial, adj. clerkly, learned, G 752. 
Clergye, s. learning, D 1277. 
Clerk, s. clerk, scholar, student, A 285 ; 

writer, D 689. 
Olernesse, s. brightness, L. 84. 
Cleve (i), V. cleave, cut, split, R. 859; L. 

758; Clefte, //. s. split, 3. 72; Cloven, 

pp. A 2934; Clove, pp. cleft, dimpled, 

R. 55°- 
Cleve (2),z^. adhere; pr.pl. B3. p 11. 112. 
Cle"W, s. clew, L. 2140. 
Cle-w,^/. s. of Clawe. 
Cley, s. clay. G 807. 
Clifte, s. cleft, L. 740; chink, B 4. p 4. 

296. 
Cliket, s. latch-key, E 2046, 2117, 2121, 

2123. 
Climben, v. climb, F 106; Clamb,//. s. 

B 1987 ; Clomb, i pt. s. climbed, HF. 

1118; Clomben,//.//. climbed, A 3636; 

Clamben, pt. pi. climbed, HF. 2151 ; 

Cloumben, B 2590; Clomben, pp. T. i. 

215 ; ascended, B 4388 ; Clombe, pp. 

risen, B 12; were clombe, hadst climbed, 

B 3592. 
Clinking", s. tinkling, B 3984. 
Clippe (i), \ pr. s. embrace, T. iii. 1344. 
Clippe (2), V. cut hair, A 3326. 
Clipping", s. embracing, R. 342. 
Clobbed, adj. clubbed, B 3088. 
Cloisterer, s. resident in a cloister, A 

259, 3661. 
Cloisterlees, adj. outside of a cloister, A 

179. 
Cloke, s. cloak, T. iii. 738. 
Clokke, s. clock, B 4044; of the cl., by 

the clock, B 14. 
Clom, interj. be silent, mum ! A 3638. 
Clombe, -n ; see Climben. 
Clods, adj. close, secret, T. ii. 1534 ; closed, 

B 4522; Clos, closed, R. 1675. 
C156th, s. piece of clothing, D 1633 ; 

infants' clothing, T. iii. 733. 
Clos, s. enclosure, B 4550. 
Closet, s. small room, T. ii. 599, 1215. 
Closing', s. enclosure, boundary, R. 527. 
Closure, s. enclosure, I 870. 
Clote-leef, s. a leaf of the burdock or 

clote-bur, G 577. A. S. date, a bur- 
dock. 
Cloth, J. cloth, garment, D 238; clothes, 

D 1881. 



Clothen, v clothe, T. v. 1418 ; Cladde, 
pi. s. clad, T. iv. 1690; ref. clothed him- 
self, 7. 145 ; Cledde, //. s. T. iii. 1521 ; 
Clad, pp. R. 409 ; covered, A 294 ; fur- 
nished, 3. 352. 

Clothered, pp. clotted, coagulated, A 
2745. (Other MSS. clotered, clotred.) 

Clothlees, adj. naked, 1 343. 

Cloud, s. sky, T. iii. 433. 

Cloumben ; see Climben. 

Clout, s. bit of cloth, C 736; patch, R. 
458 ; pi. fragments, E 1953 ; rags, C 348. 

Clouted, pp. patched up, R. 223. 

Cloven,//. ^/ Cleve (i). 

Clowes,//, claws, HF. 1785. 

Clow-gelofre, //. clove, the spice so 
called, R. 1368 ; Clowe-gilofre, B 1952. 
Fr. clou de girojle. 

Clustred, //. covered with clouds, B i. 
m 3. 6. (\jdX. glomerantur^ 

Clymat, s. a belt or zoAe of the earth 
included between two given lines of 
latitude, A. ii. 39. 28 ; //. zones of lati- 
tude, A. i. 3. 4; Clymates, sets of almi- 
canteras calculated for various terrestrial 
latitudes, A. i. 14. 4. 

Cly ven, pr. pi. cleave, keep, B 3. p 11. 115. 

Cly ves, //. cliffs, L. 1470. 

Coagulat, //. clotted, G 811. 

Cod, s. bag ; used of the receptacle of the 
stomach, C 534. 

Coempcioun, s. an imposition so called, 
lit. joint purchase, the buying up of the 
whole of any commodity in the market^ 
B I. p 4. 90. 

Cofre, s. coffer, chest, L. 380 ; money-box, 
F 1571 ; coffin, 5. 177. 

Cog-ge, s. cock-boat, L. 1481. 

Coe'he, ger. to cough, T. ii. 254. 

Coillons, //. testicles, C 952. 

Cok, s. cock, 5. 350; thridde c, third cock, 

A 4233- 
Cok ! cok ! the noise made by a cock, B 

4467. 
Cokenay, s. cockney, effeminate creature, 

A 4208. 
Cokewold, s. cuckold, A 3152. 
Cokkel, s. cockle, i. e. the corn-cockle, 

Agrostemrna githago, B 1183. 
Cokkes, corruption <7/'Goddes, H 9, I 29. 
Cokkow, s. cuckoo, HF. 243. 
Col, .r. coal, T. ii. 1332; Cole, A 2692. 
Col-blak, adj. coal-black, A 2142. 
Cold, adj. cold, A 420; chilling (often in 

phr. cares colde), T. iii. 1260; disastrous, 

B 4446. 
Colde, V. grow cold, B 879, F 1023. 
Coler, s. collar, T. v. 811; Colers, //. 



(Slossarial Kntiex. 



23 



collars, A 2152 (or read colerd, provided 

with collars). 
Colera (Lat.), choler, B 4118. 
Colere, s. choler, B 4136. 
Colerik, adj. choleric, A 587, B 4145. 
Col-fox, s. coal-fox, fox with black marks, 

B 4405. 
Collacioun, s. conference, E 325. 
Collateral, adj. adventitious, subordinate, 

r. i. 262. 
Collect, pp. collected in groups, F 1275. 
Colour, s. colour, 7. 173; complexion, 

hue, R. 213; outward appearance, 2. 66; 

pretence, 10. 21 ; excuse, D 399 ; pi. fine 

phrases, HF. 859; hues, pretences (a 

pun), F 511. 
Colpons, pi. shreds, bundles, A 679; 

billets, A 2867. 
Coltish, adj. like a colt, E 1847. 
Columbyn, adj. dove-like, E 2141. 
Colver, s. dove, L. 2319. A. S. culfre. 
Combred, pp. encumbered, B 3. m 10. 9. 
Combre-world, s. one who encumbers 

the world, who lives too long, T. iv. 279. 
Combust, pp. burnt, G 811; quenched 

(as being too near the sun), T. iii. 717. 
Come, V. come ; come thereby, come by it, 

acquire it, G 1395 ; Come, ge?-. to come, 

future, 3. 708 ; Comestow, comest thou, 

L. 1887; Cometh, pr. s. as fut. shall 

come, 4. 11; Comth, pr. s. comes, B 

407 ; Cam,//, s. came, F 81 ; C5m, pt. s. 

3.134; Comnn, pt. pi. L. 1241 ; Comen, 

pp. come, 4. 81 ; ben coinen, are come, B 

1130; Com of, i. e. seize the opportunity, 

be quick, T. ii. 1738 ; D 1602 ; Cometh, 

itup. pi. A 839. 
Come, s. coming, G 343. A. S. cyme. 
Com6dle, s. comedy, pleasant tale, one 

that ends happily, T. v. 1788. 
Comeveden, 2 pr. pi. as 2 pr. s., didst 

instigate, T. iii. 17. See Commevetli. 
Comlily, adv. in a comely way, 3. 848. 
Commevetli, pr. s. moves, induces, T. v. 

1783; CommeMit, pr. s. subj. move, T. v. 

1386. See Commoeve, Comeveden. 
Commoeve, ger. to move, influence, B 4. 

P 4- 275. 
Commoevinge, s. moving, disturbing, 

B I. m 4. 6. 
Commune, adj. general, common, B 155 ; 

/>/ c, commonly, A 1261. 
Commune, s. the commons, E 70; pi. 

commoners, A 2509. 
Compaignable, adj. companionable, B 

1 194. 
Companye, s. company, A 24; com- 
panionship, 4. 219. 



Comparisoned, pp. compared, B 2. p 7. 

118. 

Compas, s. circuit, 4. 137 ; circlet, wreath, 
R. 900; circle, A 1889; a very large 
circle, HF. 798 ; circumference, 20. 5 ; 
enclosure, orb, world, as in tryne compas, 
the threefold world (earth, sea, and 
heaven), G 45 ; pair of compasses, A. ii. 
40. 13; craft, contriving, HF. 462; pi. 
circles {or, perhaps, y>^\ys of compasses), 
HF. 1302. 

Compasment, s. plotting, contrivance, 
L. 1416. 

Compasse, v. contrive, R. 194; planned, 
L. 1414; Compassed, pp. drawn with 
compasses, fashioned circularly, A. i. 
18. I ; planned, L. 1543. 

Compassing", s. dimension, R. 1350 ; con- 
trivance, A 1996. 

Compeer, s. gossip, close friend, A 670 ; 
comrade, A 4419. 

Compilatour, s. compiler, A. pr. 70. 

C6mpleynt, s. a ' complaint ' or ballad, 2. 

43 ; 3- 464- 

Complexioun, s. complexion, A 333; 
temperament, I 585 ; the (four) tempera- 
ments, HF. 21. 

Compline, s. evening service, A 4171. 

Complisshen, v. accomplish, B 4. p 4. 24. 

Comporte, v. bear, endure, T, v. 1397. 

Composicioun, s. agreement, A 848, 
2651. 

Compotent, adj. all-powerful, B 5. p 6. 

S3- 

Compouned, //>. composed, HF. 1029; 
tempered, L. 2585; mingled, HF\ 2108; 
constructed, drawn, A. pr. 11. 

Comprehende, v. take (it) in, T. iv. 891 ; 
take in (in the mind), F 223; pr. s. com- 
prises, I 1043. 

Comprende, v. comprehend, contain, T. 
iii. 1687. 

Comunalitee, s. empire, B 4. p 6. 402. 

Comune, adj. general, common to all, T. 
iii. 1415 ; accustomed to, 3. 812; Comun 
profit, the good of the country, 5. 47, 75. 

Comune, s. a common share in a thing, 
E 1313. 

Comyn, s. cummin, B 2045. 'A dwarf 
umbelliferous plant, somewhat resem- 
bling fennel, cultivated for its seeds.' — 
Webster. 

Con, imp. s. grant ; Con me thank, grant 
me thanks, thank me, A. pr. 62. 

Conceite, s. conception, thought, L. 1764 ; 
idea, G 1214; notion, T. i. 996. 

Conclude, v. draw a conclusion, B 14; 
include, put together, G 429; attain to 



24 



(gloesarial Enticx. 



success, G 773 ; ger. to summarize, A 
1358 ; Concluded, pp. come to a con- 
clusion, E 1607. 
Conclusioun, s. decision, judgement, A 
1845 ; result, successful end of an experi- 
ment, G672; purpose, D 115; moral, L. 
2723; reason, F 492; performance, F 
1263 ; result, summar)', A 1743 I ^^i^ (of 
life), HF, 103; fate, 22. 23; as in c, 
after all, 4. 257; 15. 4; Conclusiouns, 
pi. mathematical propositions, theorems, 

^ 3193- 
Condys.//. conduits, R. 1414. 
Confedred, pp. rendered confederates, 

conjoined, 2. 42, 52. 
Conferme, v. confirm, T. ii. 1526, 
Confirme, ger. B 4. p 7. 90 (but an error 

for con/orme ; Lat. ' conformandae '). 
Confiteor, ' I confess,' I 386. 
Confiture, s. composition, C 862. Fr. 

confiture, a mixture, preserve. 
Conforten, v. comfort, E 1918 ; pr. s. en- 
courages, A 2716 ; pr.pl. strengthen, I 652. 
Confounde, v. destroy, 1.40; 12. 10; pp. 

put to confusion, i. 5 ; overwhelmed, B 

100; destroyed in soul, G 137. 
C6nf us, pp. as adj. confused, T. iv. 356 ; 

convicted of folly, G 463; confounded, 

A 2230. 
Congeyen, v. give us our congee, tell us 

to depart, T. v. 479. 
Conjectest, 2 pr. s. supposest, T. iv, 1026. 
Conjectinges, pi. conjectures, B 2598. 
Conjoining'e, s. conjunction, G 95. 
Conjuracioun, s. conjuring, I 603. 
Conne, z'. be able, L, 2044; know, T. iii. 

83 ; have experience, T. i. 647 ; know 

how, T. iii. 377; con, learn, B 1730; 

Conne, i pr. s. can, T. ii. 49; -zpr.s.subj. 

canst, knowest how, T. ii. 1497; pr. s. 

subj. may, A 4396 ; i pr.pl. can, are able, 

B483; know, HF. 335; Conne, 2 pr. pi. 

can, A 4123 ; can (do), T. i. 776 ; owe (me 

thanks), T. ii. 1466; Connen, pr. pi. 

know how to, E 2438 ; al conne he, 

whether he may know, G 846. 
Conning", s. skill, knowledge, L. 68,412; 

T. i. 83; experience, B 1671 ; learning, B 

2929. 
Conning, adj. skilful, B 3690. 
Conningest, most skilful, T. i. 331. 
Conningly, adv. skilfully, E 1017. 
Consecrat, consecrated, B 3207. 
Conseil, s. council, B 204; counsel, B 

425; secret counsel, A 1141; secret, A 

3504; advice, B 221 1 ; counsellor, A 

1 147. 
Conseile, v. counsel ; pt.pl. B 2554. 



Consentant, adj. consentient, consenting 
(to), C 276. 

Consentrik, adj. having the same centre, 
A. i. 17. 5; tending to the same centre, 
A. i. 16. 9 ; at the same altitude, A. ii. 3. 
56. 

Consequent, s. sequel, result, B 2577. 

Conservatif , adj. preserving ; c. the seun, 
preserving the sound, HF. 847. 

Conserve, v. keep, preserve, T. iv. 1664. 

Consist6rie, s. council, T. iv. 65; court 
of justice, C 162. 

Conspiracye, s. plot, B 3889, C 149. 

Constable, s. governor, B 512. 

Constdblesse, s. constable's wife, B 539. 

Constaunce. s. constancy, I 737. 

Constellacioun, s. influence of the stars, 
F 781. 

Constreyneth, pr. s. constrains, E 800 ; 
pt. s. L. 105 ; pt. s. reji. contracted her- 
self, B I. p I. 15 ; pp. constrained, com- 
pelled, E 527, F 764, 769. 

Constreynte, s. distress. T. iv. 741. 

Construe, v. divine, make out, T. iii. 33; 
ger.Xo translate, B 1718; i7np. pi. inter- 
pret, L. 152. 

Consulers, s.pl. consuls, B 2. p 6. 13. 

Consumpte, //./>/. consumed, B 2. m 7. 

27- 
Contagious, adj. contiguous, B 3. p 12. 5. 
Contek, j-. strife, contest, T. v. 1479; A 

2003. 
Contemplaunce, s. contemplation, D 

1893- 

Contenance, J'. appearance, F 1485 ; show, 
B 2378 ; gesture, B 2227 ; demeanour, E 
924; self-possession, E mo; pretence, 
I 858 ; fond his c, i. e. disposed himself, 
T. iii. 979; pi. modes of behaviour, R. 
looi. 

Contene, v. contain, T. iii. 502 ; //. s. held 
together, B 3. p 12. 40. 

Continued, pp. accompanied, eked out, 
I 1046. 

Contract, //. contracted, incurred, I 334. 

Contraire, adj. contrary, R. 348; T. i. 
212. 

Contraire, s. the contrary, HF. 1540; 
adversary, 2. 64. 

Contrdrie, adj. contrary, B 3964; in c, 
in contradiction, G 1477. 

C6ntrarie, -f. contrary, A 3057; contrary 
thing, HF. 808; opponent, A 1859; 
opposition, T. i. 418. 

Contrdrien, v. oppose, F 705 ; pt. s. gain- 
said, D 1044. 

Contrarious, adj. contrary, adverse, B 
2249; pi. B. 23 1 1. 



({^lossarinl Hntiex, 



25 



Contrarioustee, s. contrary state, I 1077. 

Contree, country, R. 768; fatherland, 
home, B 2. p 4. 120. 

Contree-folk, people of his country, L. 
2161. 

Contree-houses, //, houses of his coun- 
try, homes, 7. 25. Lat. donios patrias. 

Contree-ward, to his, towards his 
country, L. 2176. 

Contubernial, adj. familiar, at home 
with (lit. sharing the same tent with), 
I 760. 

Contumax, adj. contumacious, I 402. 

Convenient, adj. fitting, suitable, I 421 ; 
pi. suitable, F 1278. 

Convers ; 'm convers, on the reverse side, 
T. V. 1810. 

Conversacioun, s. conversation, i. e. 
manner of life, B 2501. 

Converte, v. change, T. i. 308; swerve, 
C 212; ger. to change his ways, T. iv. 
1412; to change her mind, T. ii. 903. 

Convertible, adj. equivalent, A 4395. 

Conveyen, v. introduce, E 55 ; pr. s. ac- 
companies, L. 2305 ; pt. pi. conducted 
on their way, A 2737, 

Convict,//, overcome, i. 86. 

Cony, s. rabbit ; Conies, pi. R. 1404 ; 
Conyes, pi. 5. 193. 

Cook', s. cook, A 351 ; Cokes,//. C 538. 

Coomen, //.//. came, B 1805. 

Cop, s. top, A 554 ; summit, B 2. m 4. 6 ; 
hill-top, HF. 1166. 

Cope, s. cope, A 260 ; cape, R. 408 ; cloak, 
T. iii. 724 ; vault, L. 1527. 

Coper, s. copper, HF. 1487. 

Copie, s. copy, T. ii. 1697. 

Coppe, s. cup, A 134, F 942. 

Cordg-e, Corag-e, s. heart, spirit, mind, 
disposition, mood, inclination, R. 257, 
423, 849, 1302, 1614 ; A 22 ; courage, B 
1970; will, desire, B 2713; impetuosity, 
I 655; attention, H 164; spite, R. 151; 
encouragement, R. 22; 0/ his c, in his 
disposition, F 22 ; Corages, //. disposi- 
tions, natures, A 11. 

Corbets, //. corbels, HF. 1304. 

Cordeth,/;-. s. agrees, T. ii. 1043. 

Corde"wane, s. Cordovan leather, B 1922. 

Corfe"W"-tyme, s. curfew-time, about 8 
p.m., A 3645. 

Corige, v. correct ; pr. j. B 4. p 7. 39. 

Cormeraunt, s. cormorant, 5. 362. 

Cor nieum eructavit, D 1934. See Ps. 
xlv. I. 

Corn, s. grain, A 562 ; chief portion, B 
3144 ; Cornes, //. crops of corn, B 3225 ; 
grains of corn, HF. 698. 



Fr. 



Cornemuse, s. bagpipe, HF. 1218. 

1 corfieinuse. 
I Corniculere, s. registrar, secretary, G 
369. Lat. cornicularius, a. registrar, 
clerk to a magistrate. 
Corny, adj. applied to ale, strong of the 
\ corn or malt, C 315, 456. 
I Corone, s. crown, garland, E 381 ; Co- 
roune, crown, garland, 2. 58; Coroun, 
crown, L. 216 ; the constellation called 
'the Northern Crown,' L. 2224. 
Corosif, adj. corrosive, G 853. 
Coroumping-e, s. corruption, B 3. p 12. 

82. 
Cor6uned, //. crowned, B 3555. 
Corpus, s. body, A 3743 ; Corpus, the body 
(e. g. of Christ), B 3096; Corpus Domi- 
nus, false Latin for corpus Domini, the 
body of the Lord, B 1625 ; Corpus 
Madrian, the body of St. Mathurin, 
B 3082 ; Corpus bones, an intentionally 
nonsensical oath, composed of ' corpus 
domini,' the Lord's body, and ' bones,' 

C3M- 
Correccioun, s. fine, D 1617. 
Corrunapable, adj. corruptible, A 3010. 
Corrumpeth,//-. s. becomes corrupt, L. 

2237 ; //. s, corrupted, I 819. 
Corrupcioun, s. destroyer, 5. 614. 
Cors, s. body, L. 676, 876; corpse, T. v. 

742. 
Corse, pr. s. subj. curse, E 1308. 
Corsednesse, s. abomination, T. iv. 994. 
Corseynt, s. a saint (lit. holy body) ; esp. 

a shrine, HF. 117. O. F. cors seint. 
Corumpe, v. become corrupt, B 3. p 11. 

58. See Corrumpe. 
Corve, -n; see Kerve. 
Cosin, s. cousin, A 1131; as adj. akin, 

suitable to, A 742, H 210; Cosins ger- 

mayns, cousins-german, first cousins, B 

2558. 
Cosinag'e, s. kinship, B 1226, 1329. 
Cost (i), s. expense, A 192, 213. 
Cost (2), s. choice, condition; Nedes 

cost, of necessity (lit. by condition of 

necessity), L. 2697. Icel. kostr, choice, 

condition, state. 
Costage, s. cost, expense, B 1235, 1562. 
Coste, s. coast, B 1626; region, D 922; 

Costes, pi. parts of the sky, A. i. 19. 10. 
Co^Xqy'vh^ , pre s. part, coasting, R. 134. 
Costlewe, adj. costly, I 415. Cf. Icel. 

kostligr. 
Costrel, s. flask, kind of bottle, L. 2666. 
Cote, s. cot, E 398; dungeon, A 2457. 
Cote, s. coat, jacket (for a man), A 103, 

328; skirt, petticoat, or gown (for a 



26 



(§l000arial Jlntiex. 



woman), R. 226; pi. coats, surcoats, or 
coats-of-arms (see below), HF. 1332. 

Cote-armure, coat-armour, coat shew- 
ing the arms, coat-of-arms, T. v. 1651. 

Couche, V. lay down, place; cower, E 
1206; ft. s. laid in order, placed, 5. 216; 
G 1 157; //. set, placed, laid, A 2933, 
3211; beset, begemmed, A 2161. 

Couching', s. laying down, letting the 
astrolabe lie flat on the ground, A. ii. 
29. 29. 

Coude, I pt. s. could, was able, L. 116; 
knew how, 3. 517 ; pt. s. knew, 3. 667, 
1012 ; understood, R. 179 ; as aux. could, 
R. 175 ; Coude her good, knew what was 
for Dido's advantage, L. 1182; Coude 
no good, knew no good, was untrained, 
3. 390; Coud,//. known, 3. 787; learnt, 
I 1041. See Can, Conne. 

Counseil, s. advice, A 784; secrets, A 
665 ; Counseyl, secret, 5. 348. 

Counte, I pr. s. account, 11. 29; pt s. 3. 
718. 

Countenaunce, s. appearance, show, A 
1926; looks, appearance, G 1264; shew- 
ing favour, 3. 1022; demeanour, R. 814; 
pretext, A 4421 ; p/. looks, R. 1309. 

Counting'-bord, s. counting-house table, 
B 1273. 

Countour (i), s. arithmetician, 3. 435; 
auditor, A 359. 

Countour (2), s. abacus, counting-board, 
3. 436 ; counting-house, B 1403. 

Countour-hous, s. counting-house, B 
1267. 

Countrepeise, v. render equivalent, HF. 
1750 ; countervail, T. iii. 1407. 

Countrepleted, //. made the subject of 
pleadings and counter-pleadings, argued 
against, L. 476. 

Countretaille, s. lit. countertally, 1. e. 
correspondence (of sound) ; at the c, in 
reply, E 1190. 

Countrewaite, pr. s. subj. keep watch 
over, I 1005 ; watch against, B 2509. 

Coupable, adj. culpable, blameworthy, 
B 2731, I 414. 

Coupe, s. cup, L. 1 122. 

Coured, //. s. cowered, R. 465. 

Cours, s. course, T. ii. 970; life on earth, 
G 387 ; orbit, A 2454. 

Courser, s. horse, T. ii. loii; pi. steeds, 
A 2501. 

Court, s. court, A 140; manor-house, D 
2162. 

Courtepy, an upper short coat of a coarse 
material, R. 220; A 290, D 1382. 

Coiirt-man, s. courtier, E 1492. 



Couthe, I pt. s. could, R. 513; knew, 3. 
800; knew how, A 390; Couth, pp. 
known, T. iv. 61; Couthe, pp. pi. well- 
known, A 14. 

Couthe, adv. in a known way, manifestly, 
HF. 757. 

Coveityse, s. covetousness, A 3884, C 
424; bodily craving, I 819; lust, I 336. 

Covenable, adj. fit, proper, fitting, suit- 
able, 18. 25; agreeable, B 4. p 6. 224; 
congruous, B 3. p 12. 179. 

Covenably, adv. suitably, fitly, B 2423. 

Covent, s. convent, conventual body, B 
1827, D 1863. 

Coverchief, s. kerchief worn on the head, 
D 590 ; pi. A 453. 

Covercle, s. pot-lid, HF. 792. 

Covered, pp. covered, A 354 ; recovered 
from, healed of, L. 762. 

Covertly, adv. secretly, R. 19. 

Coverture, s. disguise, R. 1588; Cover- 
tures, //. coverings, I 198. 

Covetour, s. one who covets, 4. 262. 

Covyne, s. deceitfulness, A 604. ' Coving, 
a deceitful agreement between two or 
more to the prejudice of another;' 
Cowel, Law Dictionary. 

Cow, s. chough, D 232. See Chogh. 

Coward, adj. cowardly, 5. 349. 

Cowardye, s. cowardice, A 2730. 

Cowardyse, s. cowardice, T. iv. 602, v. 412. 

Coy, adj. quiet, A 119; shy, L. 1548. 

Coye, V. quiet, calm, cajole, T. ii. 801. 

Coynes, pi. quinces, R. 1374. O. F. coin, 
quince. 

Crabbed, adj. shrewish, cross, bitter, E 
1203. 

Cracching', s. scratching, A 2834. 

Craft, s. cunning, C 84; skill, T. i. 665; 
art, R. 687; trade, occupation, 3. 791; A 
692; secret, mystery, R. 1634; might, B 
3258 ; contrivance, F 249. 

Craftily, adv. artfully, in a studied man- 
ner, T. ii. 1026 ; skilfully, B 48. 

Crafty, adj. skilful, clever, A 1897; sensi- 
ble, 3. 439. 

Craketh, pr. s. utters boldly, A 4001 ; 
sings in a grating tone (like a corn- 
crake), E 1850. 

Crampissheth, pr. s. draws convulsively 
together, contracts, 7. 171. Cf. ' Deth 
crampishing into their hert gan crepe ; ' 
Lydgate, Falls of Princes, bk. i. c. 9. 
Cf. O.F. cramp ir, ' etre tordu ; ' Godefroy. 

erased, pp. cracked, G 934. 

Creant, adj.; seith creant, acknowledges 
himself beaten, I 698. Probably short 
for recreant. 



(glossarial Entiex. 



27 



Great, pp. created, 16. 2; B 2293. 
Creaunce, s. credence, belief, creed, B 

915 ; object of faith, B 340. 
Creaunce, v. borrow on credit, B 1479; 

pr. s. borrows, B 1493 ; pp. B 1556. 
Creep, pt. s. of Crepe. 
Crekes,//. crooked devices, wiles, A 4051. 

See Creek, 5. (i), § 7, in the New E. 

Diet. 
Crepe, v. creep, 3. 144 ; Creep, pt. s. crept, 

A 4226; Crepten, />/.;)/. D 1698; Cropen, 

pp. crept, T. iii. loii. 
Crepul, s. cripple, T. iv. 1459. 
Crepusculis, s. pi. twilights, durations 

of twilight, A. ii. 6. rubric. 
Crevace, s. crevice, crack, HF. 2086. 
Crinkled,//, full of turns or cranks, L. 

2012. 
Crips, adj. crisp, curly, HF. 1386; Crisp, 

R. 824. 
Cristen, adj. Christian, B 222, 1679. 
Cristendom, s. the Christian religion, B 

351 ; Christianity, G 447. 
Cristenly, adv. in a Christian manner, B 

1122. 
Cristianitee, s. company of Christians, B 

544- 
Croce, s. staff, stick, D 484. See Crose, 

^ 2, in the New E. Diet. 
Crois, s. cross, i. 60. 
Croked, adj. crooked, R. 926; crooked 

(things), 13. 8; 'tortuous,' A. ii. 28. 32. 
Crokes, pi. crooks, hooks, L. 640. 
Crokke, s. earthenware pot, 13. 12. 
Crommes, s.pl. crumbs, G 60. 
Crone, s. crone, hag, B 432. 
Cronique. s. chronicle, B 4398. 
Croos-lyne, s. cross-line, the line from 

right to left through the centre, A. i. 

12. 7. 
Crop, s. top, sprout, new twig, T. ii. 348 ; 

crop and rote, top and root, everything, 

T. v. 1245 ; Croppes, pi. tree-tops, ends 

of branches, R. 1396; new shoots, 

A 7. 
Cropen, pp. of Crepe. 
Croper, s. crupper, G 566. 
Cros, s. cross, i. 82; Crois, i. 60. 
Croslet, J-. crucible, G 1147. 
Crouche, i pr. s. mark with the cross (to 

detend from elves), A 3479; E 1707. 
Croude, v. push, HF. 2095 > P^- ^- "^P- dost 

press, dost push, B 296. 
Crouke, s. pitcher, jug, A 4158. 
Croun, s. crown (of the head), A 4041; 

(referring to the tonsure), B 1499. 
Crouned, pp. crowned, R. 1266 ; supreme, 

F526. 



Croupe, s. crupper, D 1559. 

Crouperes, //. cruppers, I 433. 

Crowding", s. pressure, motive power, B 
299. 

Croys, s. cross, A 699, 4286. 

Crul, adj. curly, A 3314; //. A 81. Friesic 
krul, curly. 

Crydestow, didst thou cry out, A 1083 ; 
pp. proclaimed, HF. 2107. 

Crying-e, s. outcry, A 906. 

Cryke, s. creek, A 409. 

Cuciirbitfes, s. pi. cucurbites, G 794. 
' Cucurbite, a chemical vessel, originally 
made in the shape of a gourd, but some- 
times shallow, with a wide mouth, and 
used in distillation.' — Webster. 

Culpa 7nea, i. e. I acknowledge my fault, 
T. ii. 525. 

Culpe, s. guilt, blame, I 335. 

Culter, s. coulter (of a plough), A 

3763- 

Cunning, adj. skilful, 2. 97. 

Cunning-, s. skill, 5. 167, 487. 

Cuppe, s. a cup, F 616. 

Curacioun, s. cure, healing, B 2463 ; mode 
of cure, T. i. 791. 

Curat, s. pari<;h-priest, vicar, A 219 (the 
w ords vicar and curate have now, practi- 
cally, changed places). 

Cure, s. cure, remedy, T. i. 469; charge, 
B 2. p 3. 32 ; diligence, A 1007 ; attention, 
A303 ; heed, care, 2. 82 ; endeavour, B 188 ; 
careful purpose, HF. 1298; supervision, 
D 133; I do 710 cure, I care not, L. 152; 
lyth in his cure, depends on his care for 
me, L. 1 176 ; did his besy cure, was busily 
employed, 5. 369; his lyves cure, the ob- 
ject of his thoughts always, 4. 131 ; honest 
cure, care for honourable things, C 557; 
in cure, in her power, B 230. 

Curiositee, s. curious workmanship, HF. 
1178; intricacy, 18. 81. 

Curious, adj. careful, attentive, B 1433; 
eager, R. 1052; skilful, A 577; delicately 
made, A 196; magical, F 1120. 

Currours, s. pi. runners, couriers, HF. 
2128. 

Cursednesse, s. abominable sin, wicked- 
ness, C 276, 400; shrewishness, E 1239; 
malice, B 1821. 

Curteis, adj. courteous, hence, compas- 
sionate, I 246; courteous, R. 538. 

Curteisye, s. courtesy, A 46, 132. 

Custume. s. custom, D 682 ; //. payments, 
I 752; imports, I 567. 

Cut, s. lot, A 835, 845, 854. 

Cutte, V. cut, C 954 ; Cutted,//. cut short,, 
L. 973- 



28 



(©lossarial Inticx. 



Daf, s. foolish person, A 4208. 

Dagged, adj. tagged, cut into hanging 

peaks at the lower edge, I 421. 
Dag-g-ing-e, s. a cutting into tags, I 418. 
Dag'on, s. small piece, D 1751. 
Dalf , //. s. of Delve. 

Daliaunce, s. gossip, A 211 ; playful de- 
meanour, favour, 12. 8 ; pi. dalliance, 

toying, C 66. 
Damageous, adj. injurious, I 438. 
Dame, s. mother, C 684; dam, A 3260; 

madam. A 3956; goodwife, D 1797. 
Damiselle, s. damsel, R. 1240 ; pi. R. 1622. 
Dampnacioun, s. condemnation, C 500; 

curse, D 1067. 
Dampne, ger. to condemn, L. 401 ; pp. A 

1175, 1342; damned, I 191. 
Dan, s. {for Dominus), lord, sir, a title of 

respect, HF. 161; B 3982; Daun, HF. 

137- 

Dappel-gray, adj. dapple-gray, B 2074. 

Dar, \pr. s. dare, A 1151; Darst, 2.pr.s. 
darest, T. i. 768 ; B 860 ; Darstow, darest 
thou, L. 1450; Dorste, i //. s. durst, 
might venture (to) , L. 2054 ; pt. s. A 
227 ; Dorstestow, wouldst thou dare, T. 
i. 767 ; I //. s. subj. might dare, 2. 60. 
See Durre. 

"Doxe, pr. pi. doze, B 1293. 

Darketh, pr. s. lies hid, L. 816. 

Darreyne, ger. to decide one's right to, 
A 1853; to decide, A 163 1; to decide 
your claims (to) , A 1609. O. F. deraisnier. 

Dart, J', dart, 6. 40 ; (given as a prize in an 
athletic contest), D 75. 

Daswen, ;z>/. //. dase, are dazzled, H 31; 
pp. confused, HF. 658. O. F. daser 
(Godefroy). 

Date-tree, s. date-tree, R. 1364. 

Daun ; see Dan. 

Daunce, s. dance, R. 808 ; play, T. iv. 
1431 ; set, company, HF. 639 ; the neiue d., 
the new dance, T. ii. 553 ; the aide d., the 
old game, the old way of love, A 476, C 79. 

Dauncen, v. dance, A 2202, 

Daunger, s. disdain, R. 1524; imperious- 
ness, 7. 186; liability, A 1849; sparing, 
stint, R. 1147; power, control, R. 1470; 
Power to harm (personified), L. 160; 
in d., within his jurisdiction, under his 
control, A 663 ; in hir d., at her disposal, 
R. 1049 ; with d., sparingly, charily, D 

521. 
Daung-erous, adj. forbiddmg, sparmg, A 
517; niggardly, D 1427; grudging, hard 



to please, R. 1482, 1492 ; reluctant, D 514 ; 

inhospitable, R. 490. 
Daunten, v. tame, subdue, R. 880 ; pr. s. 

T. ii. 399, iv. 1589; pp. frightened, D 

463- 
Dawe, V. dawn, B 3872, E 1832. 
Dawening-e, s. dawn, A 4234, B 4072. 
Dawes, s.pl. days, F 1180. 
Dawing-, s. the Dawn (Aurora), T. iii. 

1466. 
Dawning", s. dawn, 3. 292. 
Day, s. day, A 19 ; time, B 3374 ; appointed 

time for repaying money, G 1040; on 

a day, one day, some day, R. 1493 ; 

Dayes, pi. appointed days for payment, 

F 1568, 1575 ; lifetime, B 118 ; nowadayes, 

at this time, E 1164. 
Dayerye, s. dairy, A 597; //. D 871. 
Dayesye, s. daisy, L. 182, 184, 218. 
Debaat, s. strife, A 3230, B 2867 ; war, B 

130 ; mental conflict, 3. 1192 ; quarrelling, 

T. ii. 753. 
Debate, v. fight, war, B 2058; quarrel, C 

412. 
Debonair, adj. calm, benign, gentle. 

I 658 ; Debonaire, fern, well-mannered 

B 4061; gracious, courteous, R. 797 ; as 

s. kind person, 3. 624. 
Debonairely, adv. meekly, I 660; 

graciously, 3. 851, 1284; with a good 

grace, HF. 2013; courteously, 3. 518; 

T. ii. 1259. 
Debonairetee, s. gentleness, I 467 ; 

graciousness, 6. 108. 
Deceivable, adj. deceitful, 15. 3 ; E 2058. 
Declamed. //.//. discussed, T. ii. 1247. 
Declinacioun, s. declination, angulaj 

distance N. or S. of the equator, E 2223, 

F 1033. 
Declyneth, /r. s. turns aside, B 4. p 6. 

195 ; P^' ^' possesses declination, A. ii. 

19. 12. 
Declyning-e, adj. sloping, B 5. m i. 19. 
Decoped, pp. lit. ' cut down ' ; hence, 

pierced, cut in openwork patterns, R. 

843- 

D6de, dead ; see D66d. 

D6de, ^er. to grow dead, become stupe- 
fied, HF. 552. 

Deden, pt. pi. did, T. i. 82. See Doon. 

Dedicat, pp. dedicated, I 964. 

Deduyt, s. pleasure, A 2177. 

Deed, s. deed, act ; Dede, dat. i. 45 ; B 
1999; in dede, indeed, A 659, B 3511 ; 
with the dede, with the act thereof, D 
70 ; Dede,//. (A. S. dceda), 5. 82. 

D66d, adj. dead, R. 215 ; dead, livid (of 
hue), R. 441 ; for d., as dead, T. iv. 733; 



(glossarial Jnticx. 



29 



Dede, def. L. 876 ; d. slepe, heavy sleep, 
3. 127 ; Dede, pL sluggish, 5. 187 ; 
woundes dede, deadly wounds, 3. 121 1, 

D66d.ly, adj. mortal, I 99; dying, L. 885 ; 
deathlike, 3. 162. 

D66dly, adv. mortally, G 476. 

D66f , adj. deaf, T. i. 753 ; Deve, //. G 286. 

Deel, s. part, R. 1074; never a dee/, not 
at all, I 1007 ; not a bit, HF. 331 ; every 
deel, every whit, wholly, T. ii. 590 ; Deel, 
pi. times, 6. 35 ; Del, part, R. 28 ; share, 
3. looi ; every d., every whit, A 1825 ; 
eche a d., every whit, T. iii. 694 ; a greet 
del, to a large extent, A 415 ; very often, 
3. 1 159; no del, no whit, T. i. 1089; 
never a d., not a whit, 3. 543. 

Deer, s.pl. animals, B 1926. 

Dees, pi. dice, T. ii. 1347, iv. 1098. 

Dees, s. dais, HF. 1360, 1658. 

Deeth, s. death, B 3567 ; pestilence, 
plague, T. i. 483 ; the deeth, the pesti- 
lence (with special references to the 
pestilences of 1349, 1361, and 1369), A 
605. 

Defame, s. dishonour, B 3788, C 612. 

Defaute, s. fault, 22. 56; fault (as a 
hunting term), 3. 384 {zvere on a defaute 
y-falle, had a check) ; lack, defect, 
want, 3. 5, 25, 223 ; sin, B 3718, C 370, 

Defence, s. resistance, L. 1931 ; hin- 
drance, R. 1142; covering, 5. 273; pro- 
hibition, T. iii. 138; denial, D 467. 

Defendaunt, s. ; in his d., in defending 
himself, in self-defence, I 572. 

Defende, ger. to defend, B. 2631 ; to 
forbid, G 1470. 

Defet, pp. exhausted (lit. defeated), T. 
V. 618 ; cast down, T. v. 1219. 

Deffendeth, pr. s. forbids, I 651 ; pp. I 
600. 

Defoulen, v. trample down, hence, defile, 
F 1418 ; pp. trampled down, I 191 ; 
defiled, T. v. 1339 ; disgraced, B 4. m 
7. 47 (Lat. turpatus). 

Defyne, i pr. s. pronounce, declare, T. 
iv. 390. 

Degree, J. rank, 5. 453 ; condition, position, 
A 1841 ; step, R. 485 ; footstep, B 4. m i. 
42 ; horizontal stripes, B 1. p i. 38 ; of the 
zodiac, F 386 ; at 'lowe degree, R. 883 ; 
at alle degrees, in every way, A 3724. 

Deg"ys6, adj. elaborate, I 417. 

Deg-ysinesse, s. elaborate style, I 414. 

Degysinge, s. elaborate ornamentation, 
I 425. 

Dekne, s. deacon, I 891. 

Del; see Deel. 

Delen, ger. to have dealing with, A 247; 



Dele, ger. to have dealings, T. iii. 322; 

to deal, L. 1158; v. argue, T. ii. 1749; 

Deled, pt. pi. had intercourse, L. 1517; 

Deled,/"/, apportioned, D. 2249. 
Deliberen, v. deliberate, consider, T. iv. 

169 ; //. s. deliberated, B 2916. 
Delicacye, s. amusement, B 3669; wan- 
tonness, 9. 58. 
Delicat, adj. delicious, E 1646; delicate, 

E 682 ; dainty, I 432. 
Delices, s. p'l. delights, B 2602; tender 

feelings, B 2. p 4. 78; sinful pleasures, 

B 3. p 7. I. 
Delicious, adj. giving delight, T. v. 443. 
Deliciously, adv. luxuriously, E 2025. 
Delitable, adj. delightful, R. 1440; de- 
licious, R. 1371 ; //. delightful, F 899. 
Delitably, adv. pleasingly, B 4. p i, 2. 
Delitous, adj. delicious, R. 489. 
Deliver, adj. quick, active, A 84. 
Delivere, v. set free, 13. 7 ; do away with, 

T. iii. 1012; ger. to set free (after a legal 

decision), 5, 508. 
Deliverly, adv. nimblv, B 4606 ; quickly, 

T. ii. 1088. 
Delivernesse, s. activity, B 2355. 
Delphyn, s. the constellation Dolphin, 

HF. 1006. 
Delte, pt. s. of Delen. 
Delve, V. dig, A 536 ; Dalf, i pt. s. dug, 

B 5. p I. 99 ; Dolve, pt. s. subj. had 

digged, B 5. p I. 87 ; Dolven,//. buried, 

3. 222. A. S. delfan. 
Delyces, s. pi. delights, pleasures, C 547, 

G 3; favourites (Lat. delict as), B 2. p 3. 

74- 
Dely6, adj. delicate, fine, B i. p i. 23. 

O. F. delie. 
Delyt, s. delight, joy, 3. 606; pleasing 

ornamentation, L. 1199. 
Delytable, adj. delightful, L. 321. 
Delyte, v. delight, please, 5. 27; rejl. 

lake pleasure, 5. 66 ; Delyte me, i pr. s. 

delight, L. 30. 
Delytous, adj. delicious, R. 90. 
Demaunde, s. question, T. iv. 1694, v. 

859- 

Deme, v. judge, 14. 6; decide, conclude", 
T. ii. 371 ; suppose, 4. 158 ; give a ver- 
dict, G 595; Demen, v. deem, judge, A 
3161 ; decide, B 3045 ; i pr. s. condemn, 
D 2024 ; decree, C 199 ; suppose, E 753 ; 
Demeth, imp. pi. judge, decide, L. 453; 
suppose, A 3172. 

Demeine, v. manage, HF. 959. 

Demeyne, s. dominion, B 3855. 

Demoniak, s. madman, D 2240. 

Demonstracioun, s. proof, HF. 727. 



30 



(glossarial Entiex. 



Demonstratif, adj. demonstrable, D. 
2272. 

Denticle, s. pointer, A. i. 23. i. See Al- 
mury. 

Denye, v. refuse, T. ii. 1489; Deneyed, 
pp. denied, B 3. p 10. 16. 

Depardieux, interj. on the part of God, 
by God's help, T. ii. 1058, 1212. 

Departe, v. separate, part, 7. 285 ; sever, 
T, ii. 531; divide, 1 1006; imp. s. dis- 
tinguish, T. iii. 404. 

Departinge, s. dividing, I 425, 1008; 
departure, 5. 675 ; separation, 4. 25. 

Depe, adv. deeply, 3. 165; 7. 8. 

Depeynted, pp. depicted, L. 1025; 
painted, R. 478 ; stained, T. v. 1599. 

Dapper, adv. comp. deeper, T. ii. 485 ; 
B630. 

Depraven, pr.pl. calumniate, 4. 207. 

Depressioun, s. the angular distance of 
the southern pole from the horizon, A. 
ii. 25. 10. 

Dere, adj. dear, i. 99; 4. 147. 

Dere, adv. dearly, i. 86; 18. 26. 

Dere, s. dat. deer, R. 1453. 

D6re, V. injure, harm, T. i. 651. A. S. 
derian. 

Dereling", s. darling, A 3793. 

Derk, adj. dark, R. 1009 ; inauspicious, 
4. 120 ; as s. inauspicious position, 4. 122. 

Derke, s. darkness, gloom, 3. 609. 

Derkest, adj. superl. darkest, B 304. 

Derkly, adv. darkly, HF. 51. 

Derknesse, s. darkness, B 1451. 

Derne, adj. secret, A 3200, 3278. 

Derre, adv. comp. more dearly, T. i. 136, 
174 ; A 1448. 

Derth, s. dearth, HF. 1974. 

Deryveth, pr. s. is derived, A 3006. 

Desceivaunce, s. deception, B 3. p 8. 53. 

Descencioun, s. descension, A. ii. 4. 55. 
The technical signification seems to be 
— the 'house' or portion of the sky 
just above the western horizon, so that 
a planet in his descension is about to 
set. 

Descensories, s. pi. G 792. ' Descenso- 
ries, vessels used in chemistry for extract- 
ing oWs per descensum ; ' Tyrwhitt. 

Descerne, v. discern, T. iv. 200. 

Descharg-e, pr. s. subj. disburden, I 360. 

Desclaundred, pp. slandered, B 674. 

Descryve, v. describe, R. 705 ; HF. 1105. 

Desdeyn, s. disdain, contempt, A 789. 

Desert, s. merit, 4. 31 ; pi. merits, T. iii. 
1267. 

Deserte. adj. lonely, HF. 417. 

Deservedest, 2.pt. s. didst deserve, C 216. 



Desespaired, pp. in despair, 6. 7. 

Desespeir. s. despair, T. i. 605, ii. 6. 

Desesperaunce, s. hopelessness, T. ii. 
530. 1307. 

Desherite, ger. to disinherit, B 3025. 

Deshonestee, s. unseemUness, I 833. 

D6sir6us, adj. ambitious, 9. 59 ; ardent, 
F 23. 

Deslavee, adj. foul, I 629 ; inordinate, 
unrestrained, I 834. ' Deslave, pp. non 
lave, crasseux, sale ; ' Godefroy. 

Desordeynee, adj. unregulated, inor- 
dinate, I 818, 915. 

Desordinat, adj. inordinate, I 415. 

Despeired, pp. sunk in despair, 2. 91 ; T. 
V. 713. 

Despence, s. expense, D 1874; expendi- 
ture, money for expenses, B 105. 

Despende, v. spend, T. iv. 921; 2 pr. s. 
wastest B 2121 ; pp. spent, A 3983. 

Despendours, pi. spenders, B 2843. 

Despenses, pi. expenditure, B 2842. 

Desperacioun, s. despair, i. 21. 

D6spitous, adj. spiteful, R. 173; angry, 
jealous, D 761 ; merciless, A 516; scorn- 
ful, A 1777, I 395. 

Despitously, adv. scornfully, B 3785 ; 
angrily, A 4274; maliciously, B 605; 
cruelly, E 535. 

Desplayeth, pr. s. spreads open, A 966. 

Desponeth, pr. s. disposes, T. iv. 964. 

Desport, s. diversion, merriment, amuse- 
ment, T. i. 592; B 2158. 

Desporte, v. rejoice, T. v. 1398. 

Despoyled, pp. robbed, I 665. 

Despyt, s. malice, spite, T. i. 207 ; con- 
tempt, disdain, D 1876; scorn, L. 372; 
malice, L. 1771 ; ill-humour, I 507 ; a 
deed expressing contempt, B 3738 : in 
d. of, in contempt of, 5. 281 ; iti your d., 
in contempt of you, B 1753 ; in his d., in 
scorn of him, L. 134. 

Desray, jr. confusion, I 927. 

Dessaveraunce, s. separation,T. iii. 1424. 

Destemperaunce, s. inclemency, B 3. 
p II. 130. 

Destenapred, //. distempered, I 826. 

Destinal, adj. fatal, B 4. p 6. 172; pre- 
destined, B 4. p 6. no. 

Destourbe, ger. to disturb; d. of, to 
disturb in, C 340; /r. j. hinders, I 576; 
interrupts, B 2167. 

Destourbing", s. trouble, 18. 44. 

Destrat, pp. distracted, B 3. p 8. 19. 

Destreyne, v. distress, T. iii. 1528 ; ger. 
constrain, force, H 161. 

Destroubled, pp. disturbed, 3. 524. 

Desyringe, adj. desirous, B 2767. 



(©lossarial JlntJEi. 



31 



Determinat, adj. determinate, exact, 
fixed, D 1459 ; properly placed (on the 
astrolabe). A, ii. 18 (rubric). 

D^termyne, v. come to an end, T. iii. 
379 ; Determined, //. settled, B 5. p 
4. 9. 

Dette, s. debt, L. 541 ; A 280, 

Dettelees, adj. free from debt, A 582. 

Dettour, s. debtor, B 1587, D 155. 

Dens /lie, God (be) here, D 1770. 

Deve, pi. of Deef, deaf. 

Devil, s. L. 2493 ; what d., what the devil, 
L. 2694 ; how d., how the devil, T. i. 623 ; 
a d. 7neye, in the way to the devil, in 
the devil's name, A 3134; a twenty devil 
way, in the way of twenty devils, i. e. 
to utter destruction, L. 2177; an excla- 
mation of petulance, A 3713, 4257. 

Devoir, s. duty, T. iii. 1045 '> ^ 2598. 

Devyn, s. astrologer, T. i. 66. 

Devyne, v. guess, T. v. 288 ; £-er. T. iii. 
765; to prophesy (by), 5. 182; Devyne, 
pr. pi, suspect, T. ii. 1745 ; Devyne, 
pr. s. siibj. let (him) guess, HF. 14. 

De vyneresse , s. female diviner, T. v. 1522. 

Devys, s. contrivance, R. 1413 ; suppo- 
sition, R. 651; direction, A 816; at his 
d., according to his own wish, R. 1326 ; 
at point d., with great exactness or 
exactitude, R. 830 ; Devyses, //. heraldic 
devices, badges, L. 1272. 

Devyse, v. to relate, tell, describe, T. iii. 
41; A 34; recommend, T.ii. 388 ; devise, 
suggest, ordain, L. 437; plan, L. 1453; 
^^r. to tell, describe, 5. 398 ; to relate, 
A 994 ; to frame, E 739 ; to tell of, T. i. 
277 ; pr. s. narrates, describes, 5. 317 ; 
pr. pi. imagine, discourse, F 261 ; pp. 
described to, told, R. 476. 

Devysing", s. arrangement, A 2496. 

De-we, adj. due, I 867. 

Dextrer, s. a courser, war-horse, B 2103. 
Fr. destrier, a war-horse. Low Lat. 
dextrarius. The squire rode his own 
horse, and led his master's horse 
beside him, on his right hand. 

Deye, s. dairywoman, B 4036." Icel, 
deigja. 

Deye, v. die, 5. 469, 651 ; Deyde, pt. s. A 
2846; Deyed, pp. R. 456; Deyde,//. s. 
subj. should die, A 3427. 

Deyen, ger. to dye, to dip, B 4. m 6. 14. 

Deying-e, s. death, B 1850; lay on deying, 
lay a-dying, B 3906. 

Deyne, v. deign, 7. 231 ; Deyneth him, 
pr. s. he deigns, 7. 181; I>. 395; him 
deyned, he deigned, B 3324, 4371 ; hir 
deyned, she deigned, 4. 39. 



Deynous, adj. scornful, A 3941. 

Deyntee, s. worth, value, D 208; took 
lesse d. for, set less value on, 7. 143; 
a peculiar pleasure, B 139; pleasure, 
F681, 1003 ; Deyntees,/>/. dainties, A 346. 

Deyntee, s. as adj. dainty, pleasant, rare, 
'I\ V. 438 ; good, A 168. 

Deyntevous, adj. dainty, E 265. 

Deys, s. dais, platform, the high table 
in a dining-hall, A 370, 2200. 

Diademe, s. diadem, crown of an em- 
peror, 14. 7. 

Didpred, pp. as adj. variegated, diver- 
sified with figures, A 2158. 

Dich, s. ditch, A 3964. 

Dichen, v. make a dyke round, L. 708 ; 
p/>. provided with a moat, A 1888. 

Dide, Didest ; see Doon. 

Diete, s. diet, daily food, A 435. 

Diffamacioun, s. defamation, D 1304. 

Diffame, s. ill report, E 540, 730. 

Diffame, ger. to dishonour, HF. 1581 ; v. 
cry down, D 2212. 

Diffinicioun, s. clear exposition, D 25. 

Diflanisshe, pr. s. subj. define, B 5. p 
I. 36. 

DifBriitif, adj. definite, final, C 172. 

Diffusioun, s. prolixity, T. iii, 296. 

Diffye, i pr. s. defy, spurn, D 1928. 

Diffyne,^^r. define, state clearly, 5. 529; 
•2. pr. pi. conclude, HF. 344. 

Dig-estible, adj. easy to be digested, A 

437- 

Dig-hte, V. prepare, L. 1288 ; prepare 
(himself), L. 1000; Dighte me, prepare 
myself to go, B 3104; ordain, place, 
T. iv. 1188; lie with, D 767; pt. s. rejl. 
hastened, betook himself, T. ii. 948 ; 
lay with, D 398 ; Dight, pp. arrayed, 
equipped, T. iii. 1773; served, H 312; 
prepared, R. 941 ; prepared him to go, 
B 3719 ; Dighte, pp. pi. prepared, L. 
261 1. A. S. dihtan ; from Lat. dictare. 

Digne, a^'. worthy, T. i. 429; honourable, 
noble, B 1175, C 695; suitable, B 778; 
proud, disdainful, A 517; scornful, re- 
pellent, A 3964. 

Dignely, adv. scornfully, T. ii. 1024. 

Dignitee, s. worth, dignity, C 701, 782; 
rank, E 470. Dignity, in astrology, 
signifies the advantages which a planet 
has when in a particular position in 
the zodiac, or in a particular position 
with regard to other planets (Bailey). 

Dilatacioun, s. diffuseness, B 232. 

Diluge, s. deluge, I 839. 

Dint. s. stroke, HF. 534. 

Direct, a<^'. directed, addressed, 18. 75; 



32 



(^lasgarial Jnticx. 



in directe, in a line with, A. ii, 44. 26. 

A planet's motion is direct when it 

moves in the same direction as the 

sun in the zodiac. 
Directe, i pr. s. address, T. v. 1856. 
Disavaunce, v. defeat, T. ii. 511. 
Disaventure, s. misfortune, T. ii. 415. 
Disblameth, imp. pi. free (me) from 

blame, T. ii. 17. 
Disceyving', s. deception, R. 1590. 
Dischevele, adj. with (his) hair hanging 

loosely down, A 683; with hair in dis- 
order, L. 1315. 
Disciplyne, s. bodily mortification, I 

1052. 
Disclaundre, s. reproach, T. iv. 564; 

slander, I 623. 
Disconfiture, s. defeat, A 1008; grief, 

7. 326. 
Disconfort, s. discouragement, discom- 
fort, A 2010; grief, woe, T. iv. 311. 
Disconforten, v. discourage, A 2704. 
Discordable, discordant, T. iii. 1753. 
Discordances, s.pl. discords, I 275. 
Discorden, pr. pi. disagree, B 4, p 6. 

208. 
Discording-e, adj. different, B 3. p 2. 140. 

(Lat. dissidentes.) 
Discovered, pp. revealed, G 1468. 
Discovert, pp. uncovered; at d., when 

unprotected, I 714. 
Discryve,r/. describe, T.V.267; Discreven, 

V. T. iv. 802. 
Discure, v. reveal, discover, 3. 549. 
Discussed, //. discussed, 5. 624; driven 

away, B i. m 3. i. 
Disdeyn, s. disdain, R. 296. 
Disencreseth, pr. s. decreases, B 5. p 

6.85. 
Disese, s. discomfort, grief, misery, 4. 

216, 277 ; T. ii. 987 ; sorrow, 7. 226 ; dis- 
pleasure, T. ii. 147; disease, ill, HF. 89; 

inconvenience, I 609; distress, B 616; 

unrest, F 1314. 
Disesen, ger. to trouble, T. iii. 1468 ; v. 

vex, T. iv. 1304; distress, T. i. 573. 
Disesperat, adj. without hope, HF. 2015. 
Disflgurat, adj. disguised, 5. 222. 
Disfig-iire, s. disfigurement, D 960. 
Disflg-iire, v. disguise, L. 2046; pp. 

changed, A 1403. 
Disgressioun, digression, T. i. 143. 
Disgyse, ger. to disguise, T. v. 1577. 
Disherited, //. disinherited, deprived, 

L. 1065. 
Dish-metes, pi. spoon-meat, broth, I 455. 
Dishonest, adj. unfaithful, H 214; Dis- 

honeste, shameful, E 876. 



Disjoynt, s. failure, A 2962; difficult 
position, B 1601 ; dat. peril, T. iii. 496, 
V. 1618. 

Dismal, s. unlucky day, 3. 1206. 

Dismemhred, //.//. dismembered, I 591. 

Dismemtoring-e, s. dismembering, I 591. 

Disobeysaunt, adj. disobedient, 5. 429. 

Disordenaunce, s. violation of rules, 
HF. 27. 

Disparage, s. disgrace, E 908. 

Disparage, v. dishonour, A 4271 ; //. 
misallied, D 1069. 

Dispeire yow, imp.pl. despair, E 1669. 

Dispence, s. expenditure, expense, A 
441; what I spend, D 1432; cost, B 
1195; lavish help, HF. 260; Disi>enses, 
pi. expenses, R. 1144. 

Dispende, v. spend, B 3500; pp. spent, 
shared, B 2560. 

Dispeyred, adj. despairing, F 1084. 

Dispitous, adj. spiteful, R. 156; T. iii. 
1458; grievous, sad, T. v. 199; Dis- 
pit6use, voc. pitiless, T. ii. 435 ; def. 
fern, cruel, 3. 624. 

Displtously, arfz^. angrily, A 1124; spite- 
fully, T. v. 1806; cruelly, HF. 161. 

Displesant, adj. displeasing, I 544, 697. 

Displesaunce, s. displeasure, T. iii. 480; 
offence, C 74; Displesances, //. annoy- 
ances, C 420. 

Dispone, imp. s. dispose, T. v. 300; pr. s. 
disposes, orders, regulates, B 4. p 6. 60. 

Disport, s. sport, pleasantry, A 137, 775 ; 
amusement, diversioun, D 839 ; pleasure, 
B 143 ; sport, 4. 177. 

Disporte, ger. to amuse, HF. 571; to 
exhilarate, T. ii. 1673; v. cheer, T. iii. 
1 133 ; p^- pi- sport, play, E 2040. 

Disposed, pt. s. purposed, E 244; pp. 
disposed, T. ii. 682; ready, T. iv. 230; 
rvel d., in good health (the reverse of 
ii7 disposed^, H 33. 

Disposicioun, s. disposal, T. ii. 526, v. 2 ; 
position, A 1087; frame of mind, B 
2326. 

Dispoylinge, s. spoil, B 4. m 7. 32. 

Dispreisen, ger. to disparage, R. 1053 ; 
V. blame, B 2261 ; pres. pt. depreciating, 
B 2741. 

Dispreisinge, s. blame, I 497 ; contempt, 
B 2876. 

Disputisoun, s. argument, E 1474 ; dis- 
pute, B 4428, F 890. 

Dispyt, s. despite, scorn, L. 1822; dis- 
dain, HF. 1716; vexation, R, 1487; in 
d. of, in spite of, HF. 1668. 

Disserveth, pr. s. deserves, I 756. 

Dissever, v. part, 2. 115; 17. 15; ger. to 



i^lossarial hxtitx. 



35 



part, G 875 ; />/>. separated, B 4. p 3. 

19. 
Disseveraunce, s. severing, B 3. p 11. 64, 
Disshevele, adj. with hair flowing down, 

5. 235. See Dischevele. 
Dissimulen, v. dissimulate, T. i. 322, iii. 

Dissimuling'e, s. dissimulation, dissem- 
bling, T, V. 1613, G 1073. 

Dissimulour. s. dissembler, B 4418. 

Disslaundred, //>. defamed, L. 1031. 

Dissolveth, pr. s. puts an end to, B 2. 
P 3- 92. 

Distantz, adj. pi. distant ; evei^e distantz, 
equidistant, A. i. 17. 52. 

Distemperaunce, s. inclemency, I 421. 

Distempre, adj. distempered, furious, B 
4. p 3. 125. 

Distempre, v. vex, B 2426; imp. s. be 
out of temper, D 2195. 

Disteyne, v. stain, bedim, dull, L. 255. 

Disting- wed,;)/, distinguished, B 2. p 5. 75. 

Distourbe, v. disturb, T. iv. 563; (to) 
interfere with, T. iv. 934; prevent, T. iv. 
1103. See Destourbe. 

Distreyne, v. constrain, A 1816; get 
into his grasp, clutch, 20. 8 ; imp. s. 
constrain, T. v. 596; Distreyneth, pr. s. 
secures, clutches, grasps, 5, 337 ; afflicts, 
F 820; pp. misled, T. ii. 840; assessed, 
taxed, I 752. 

Disturbed, pp. altered, T. ii. 622. 

Disturne, v. turn aside, T. iii. 718. 

Ditee, s. ditty, song, B 3. p i. 2; //. HF. 
622. See Dyte. 

Diurne, adj. diurnal, E 1795. 

Divers, adj. diverse, various, 3. 653 ; dat. 
different, 2. 17. 

Diversely, adv. in different ways, R. 
1629. 

Diversitee, s. variety, T. v. 1793. 

Divinistre, s. theologian, A 2811. 

Divisioun, s, distinction, A 1781 ; differ- 
ence, 10. 33 ; of my d., under my influ- 
ence, 4. 273. 

Divynailes, pi. divinations, I 605. 

Divynen, v. guess, T. iii. 458 ; i pr. s. 
declare, 12. 19 ; pres. pt. guessing, A 2515. 

Divyninge, s. opinion, A 2521. 

Divynis, pi. theologians, A 1323. 

Divynour, s. seer, soothsayer, B 5. p 

3- 149- 

Do; see Doon. 

Doctour, s. doctor, A 411; (i.e. .St. Au- 
gustine), C 117; theologian, I 85; //. 
teachers, D 1648. 

Dogerel, adj. doggrel, B 2115. 

Dog-ge, s. dog, D 1369, E 2014. 



Dog-hter, s. daughter, L. 114; B 151: 
Doghtren, pi. L. 1963; Doughtren, //. 
T. iv. 22. 

Doinges,//. deeds, L. 1681. 

Doke, s. duck, 5. 498, 589; A 3576. 

Dokke, s. dock (plant), T. iv. 461. 

Dokked. pp. cut short, A 590. 

Dolve, Dolven; see Delve. 

Domb, adj. dumb, HF. 656. 

Domesday, s. doom's day, HF. 1284. 

Domesman, s. judge, B 3680, I 594. 

Dominacioun, s. power, A 2758 ; do- 
minion, C 560; chief influence, F 352; 
supremacy, H 181. 

Domifius ; see Corpus. 

Dotnus Dedali, the labyrinth of Daedalus^ 
HF. 1920. 

Don, imp. s. don, put on, T. ii. 954. 

Don, Done ; see Doon. 

Dong-carte, s. dung-cart, B 4226. 

Dongeoun, s. keep-tower, A 1057. 

Donne, adj. pi. dun, dusky, T. ii. 908 ; 
dun-coloured, 5. 334. 

Doom, s. judgement, F 928 ; opinion, B 
3127; sentence, decision: hir d., the 
decision passed on them, 5.308; Dome, 
dat. opinion, T. i. 100; judgement, HF. 
1905 ; C 637 ; to my d., in my opinion, R. 
901 ; stonde to the d., abide by the de- 
cision, 5. 546; Domes, //. judgements, 
A 323. 

Doon, V. do, execute, A 960; do, 3. 194; 
act, B 90; cause, B 3618 ; dooti us honge, 
cause us to be hung, C 790; do7i. her 
companye, accompany her, 4. 125 ; leet 
don cry en, caused to be cried, F 46 ; Do, 
V. cause, T. iv. 1683; use, B 2204; fulfil, 
B 1653 ; make, 3. 145 ; do werche, cause 
to be built, G 545; Done,^^;-. to do, T. 
i. 1026 ; what to done, what is to be done,. 
3. 689 ; for to done, a fit thing to do, I 62 ; 
to be done, L. 1597 ; Doon, ger. to do, A 
78, 768; to commit, I 90; to cause, R. 
1178 ; to force, 5. 221 ; to don, from doing, 
B 4. p 6. 323 ; Do, ger. to make, 3. 1260 ; 
to cause, T. ii. 1022 ; to commit, I 129; 
Doost, 2 pr. s. makest, C 312; Dostow, 
doest thou, L. 315 ; Booth, pr. s. causes, 
A 2396 ; Doth, pr. s. makes, 2. 7 ; causes, 
6. 21 ; Doth forth, continues, E 1015 ; 
Doon, pr. pi. do, A 268 ; Do, imp. s. make, 
H 12; bring (it) about, A 2405 ; cause, G 
32 ; do /ia/7^(?, cause me to be hung, G 1029; 
do fecche, cause to be fetched, B 662 ; do 
wey, put away, lay aside, G 487; take 
away, A 3287 ; do stryke.ji hir out, cause 
her to be struck out, D 1364 ; do come, 
cause to come, B 2035 ; Dooth, imp.pl. do 



34 



(BloQmxml hxtitx. 



ye, C 745, 1 105 ; as dooth, pray do, F 458 ; 
Didest, 2 pt. s. didst, T. iii, 363 ; Dide, 
pt. s. did, 3. 373 ; caused, R. 607 ; put on, 
B 2047 ; dide hef?i drawe, caused to be 
drawn, B 1823 ; dide doft sleen, caused to 
be slain, caused (men) to have them 
slain {sleen, like don, is in the infin. 
mood) , D 2042 ; dide of, took off, 3. 516 ; 
Dide, pt. s. siibj. should do, F 1404; 
Diden, pt. pi. made, 22. 28 ; //. pi. subj. 
should do, L. 723 ; Doon, pp. done, 
I. 54; past, ended, 3. 40; doon to dethe, 
done to death, L. 889 ; doon make, 
caused to be made, E 253 ; hath doon 
yow kept, has caused you to be pre- 
served, E 1098 ; doon ther write, caused 
to be written (or described there), R. 
413 ; don to dye, done to death, murdered, 
R. 1063 ; Do, pp. done, L. 957 ; ended, E 
2440. 

Dore, s. door, R. 537, A 550 ; out at d., out 
of doors, D 1757, H 306. 

Dormant, s. table dormant, a permanent 
side-table, A 353. 

Dorre, Dorring ; see Durre, Durring-. 

Dorste ; see Dar. 

Dortour, s. dormitory, D 1855. 

Doseyn, s. a dozen, A 578. 

Dossers, pi. baskets to carry on the back, 
HF. 1940. 

Dostow, doest thou, D 239. 

Dotard, adj. foolish, D 291. 

Dote, V. dote, grow foolish, L, 261 a; 
Doten, act foolishly, G 983. 

Doth, pr. s. causes, R. 389 ; Doth . . . carie, 
causes to be carried, A 3410; makes, F 
1257 ; imp.pl. do ye, B 2785. See Doon. 

Double, adj. twofold, 4. 109 ; deceitful, 
HF. 285. 

Doublenesse, s. duplicity, 7. 159; 9, 63. 

Doucet, adj. dulcet, i. e. dulcet (pipe), 
sweet-sounding (pipe), HF. 1221. 

Doughter, s. daughter, T. iii. 3 ; Dough- 
tren, pi. T. iv. 22. 

Dounab, adj. dumb, A 774. 

Doun, s. down, soft feathers, 9, 45. 

Doun, adv. down, F 323 ; up and doun, in 
all directions, in all ways, B 53. 

Doune, dat. down, hill.B 1986. 

Dounere, adv. more downward, A. ii. 12. 
22. 

Doun-right, adv. at once, H 228. 

Dounward, adv. outward, southward, A. 
ii. 40. 63. 

Doutance, s. doubt, T. iv. 963 ; pi. per- 
plexities, T. i. 200. 

Doute, s. doubt, i. 25 ; fear, F 1096, 1 91 ; 
peril, L. 1613 ; suspense, E 1721 ; lack, 



T. ii. 366 ; out of doute, doubtless, A 487 ; 
sans d., without doubt, D 1838; with- 
outen d., certainly, L. 383. 

Doutelees, adv. without doubt, certainly, 
T. ii. 494; A 1831. 

Douten, v. fear, I 648 ; pr. s. fears, I 953 ; 
Douteth, imp. pi. fear, T. i. 683. 

Doutous, adj. doubtful, T. iv. 992. 

D'outrenaere, adj. from beyond the seas, 
foreign, imported, 3. 253. 

Douve, s. dove, 5. 341 ; pigeon, C 397. 

Do'waire, s. dower, E 848. 

Dowe, ipr. s. grant, give, T. v. 230. 

Dowve ; see DOUVB. 

Dradde ; see Drede. 

Draf. s. draff, refuse (of corn), chaff, I 35 ; 
L. 312 a. 

Draf-sek, s. sack full of ' draff,' A 4206. 

Dragges, pi. digestive sw-eetmeats, A 
426 (in MS. Had. only; other MSS. 
have drogges). 

Dragoun, s. dragon, L. 1430, 158 1 ; tail 
of the dr., the Dragon's tail, A. li. 4. 36; 
the point where a planet (esp. the moon) 
passed from the nortiiern to the southern 
side of the ecliptic. (The opposite node 
was called the Dragon's Head.) 

Drasty, adj. filthy, worthless, B2113, 2120. 
Cf. A. S. dreste?t, dcBrstan, dregs. 

Drat, pr. s. c/" Drede. 

Draught (of drink), L. 2667; move at 
chess, 3. 682. 

Drawe, v. draw, incline, E 314; dr. him, 
withdraw himself, F 355 ; bring forward, 
R. 6 ; v. attract, R. 1183; recall, A 2074; 
ger. to draw, to carry, A 1416 ; to bring 
back, I 239 ; Draweth along, pr. s. pro- 
longs, B I. m I. 32 (Lat. protrah/t) ; pr. 
pi. refi. withdraw themselves, F 252; 
Drough, jz^/. s. drew, A 4304; drew along, 
T. V. 1558 ; refl. drew himself,approached, 
B 1710; Drow,//. s. drew, B 3292; drew 
near, D 993 ; moved (as the sun) , 5. 490 ; 
hoisted, L. 1563 ; Drew, pt. s. attracted, 
3. 864 ; drozve to record, didst bring to 
witness, 16. 22; Drowe, pt. pi. drew, R. 
1678; Drawe, pp. drawn, T. iii. 674; 
pres. part, resorting, B 1217. 

Drecche, v. be tedious, T. ii. 1264; ger. 
to vex, T. ii. 1471; zpr. pi. tarry, T. iv. 
1446 ; pp. vexed, troubled, B 4077. 

Drecchinge, s. prolonging, I 1000; 
Drecching, delay, T. iii. 853. 

Drede, s. dread, fear, A 1998 ; uncertainty, 
17. 28 ; doubt, 5. 52 ; it is no drede, with- 
out doubt, B 869, E 1155; out of drede, 
without doubt, E 634; pi. fears, T. i. 
463- 



(glossarial EntJex. 



35 



Drede, z/. dread, fear, i. 76; refl. dread, 
A 660 ; ger. to be dreaded, to be feared, 
B4253; Drat, />/-. J. dreadeth, dreads, T. 
iii. 328 ; Dredde, \pt. s. was afraid, T. ii. 
482; Dradde, //. s. feared, B 3402; 
Dradde liim, was afraid, B 3918; Drad- 
den,/-/. pi. G 15 ; Drad, pp. E 69. 

Dredeles, adj. fearless, B 3. m 12. 11. 

Dredeles, adv. without doubt, certainly, 

3- 764- , , , 

Dredful, adj. terrible, B 3558; fearful, 
timid, L. 109; cautious, A 1479. 

DredfuUy, adv. timidly, T. ii. 1128. 

Dreint, -e ; see Drenchen. 

Dremed me, pt.s. I dreamt, R. 51. 

Dreminges, pi. dreams, B 4280. 

Drenchen, (i) ger. to drown, A 3617; 
Drenche, v. drown, HF. 205; do me 
drenche, make (men) drown me, cause 
me to be drowned, E 2201 : Drenchen {2) 
V. be drowned, A 3521 ; be overwhelmed, 
L. 2919; pr.s. swamps, I 363; Dreinte, 
pt.s. (i) drowned, 3. 72; Dreynte, />/■. j. 
drowned, I 839; Dreynte, pt. s. (2) was 
drowned, B 923 ; Dreynte, 2 pt. pi. were 
drowned, T. iv. 930; pt. pi. drowned, F 
1378 ; Drenched, pp. drowned, L. 2178 ; 
Dreynt, pp. 3. 148 ; Dreynte, pp. as def. 
adj. drowned, B 69 ; pp. pi. HF. 233. 

Drenching-, s. drowning, A 2456, B 485. 

Drerinesse, s. sadness, T. i. 701, 

Drery, adj. sad, E 514; terrified, L. 810. 

Dresse, v. direct, 14, 3 ; dispose, get ready, 
T. ii. 71 ; prepare, E 1049 ; set in order, 
A 106 ; V. rejl. address oneself, E 1007 ; 
direct himself, go, A 3468 ; direct myself, 
R. no; address himself, direct himself 
{or perhaps, mount), T. v. 37; Dresse 
her, settle herself, L. 804 ; Dresse, ger. 
to direct, B 2308 ; ger. rejl. prepare him- 
self, T. V. 279; prepare, 5. 88 ; pt. s. rejl. 
raised himself, T. iii, 71 ; took up his 
station, A 3358 ; pp. arrayed, E 2361 ; 
prepared, 5. 665. 

Dreye, adj. dry, A 3024; as s., 5. 380. 

Dreyeth, pr. s. dries up, drains, I 848. 

Dreynt, -e ; see Drenche. 

Drogges, //, drugs, A 426. 

Drogh; see Drawe. 

Droghte, s. drought, A 2. 595. 

Dronkelewe, adj. addicted to drink, B 
2383, C 495, D 2043. 

Drough, pt. s. of Drawe. 

Droughte, s. thirst {siti), B 2. p 7. 44. 

Drouped, pt. s. were draggled, A 107. 

Drovy, adj. dirtv, muddy, I 816. 

Drow', -e ; see Drawe. 

Druerye, s. affection, R. 844. 



Drugge,^^r, to drudge, A 1416. 
Drunken, adj. causing drunkenness, 5. 

181. 
Drye, ger. to endure, T. v, 42 ; v. suffer, 

endure, 4. 251. 
Dryve, v. drive, F 183; hasten, D 1694; 

whirl round, 10. 46; pass away, T. v. 

394 ; dryve away, pass away, C 628 ; 

Dryveth forth, pr. s. continues, goes on 

with, T. i. 1092; Dryfth, /n s. impels, 

T. V. 1332 ; Dry ven (the day) , pr. pi. pass 

(the day), L. 2620; Droof, pt. .r. drove, 

brought, T. v. 475; incited, T. iii. 994; 

Drive, pp. driven, passed away, T. v. 

389; completed, F 1230. 
Duetee, s. duty, A 3060; debt, D 1391 ; 

sum due, D 1352. 
Dulcarnon, s. an inexplicable dilemma, 

one's wit's end, T. iii. 931. 
Dulle, ger. to feel dull, T. ii. 1035 ; makes 

dull, stupefies, G 1073, 1172; Dulled,//. 

made of none effect, I 233. 
Dun, adj. swarthy, R. 1213 ; Donne, pi. 

dusky, T. ii. 908 ; dun-coloured, 5. 334. 
Dun, s. the dun horse, H 5. ' IDun is in 

the mire ' is the name of an old rustic 

game. 
Dungeoun, s. keep-tower, chief castle, L. 

937- 
Dure, V. last, endure, A 2770; remain, A 

1236 ; live, T. iv. 765 ; continue, F 836. 
Duresse, s. hardship, T. v. 399. 
Durre, ger. to dare (to do) , T. v. 840. See 

Diirren in Stratmann ; atid see Dar. 
Durring, s. daring, bravery; d. don, 

daring to do, courage to execute, T. v. 

837. 
Durste : see Dar, 
Dusked, pt. pi. grew dim, A 2806. 
Dwale. s. soporific drink, A 4161. 
Dwelle, V. remain, A 1661 ; tarry, stay, 3. 

712 ; ger. to delay, HF. 252 ; Dwelled,//. 

dwelt, A 1228; unp.s. remain, T.iv. 1449. 
Dwellinges, s. pi. delays, B i. m i. 33 

(Lat. moras). 
Dwyned, //. as adj. dwindled, R. 360. 
Dy, say ; jje vous dy, I tell vou, D 1832, 

1838. 
Dye, V. die, 2. 7 ; ger. to die, B 114 ; Dyde, 

//. s. died, HF. 106, 380; pt. s. subj. 

would die, D 965. See Deye. 
Dyen, ger. to dye, B 4648. 
Dyere, s. dyer, A 362. 
Dyinge, s. death, B 3073. 
Dyke, v. to make dikes or ditches, A 536. 
Dys. //. dice, A 1238. See Dees. 
Dyte, s. ditty, 23. 16. See Ditee. 
Dyverseth,/r. .f. varies, T. iii. 1752. 



C 2 



36 



(^lossarial IvlUzx, 



E. 

Ebbe, s. low water, F 259. 

Ebben, v. ebb, T. iv. 1145. 

Ecclesiaste, s. minister, A 708. 

Ecb, adj. each, A 39, 369. 

Ecbe, V. increase, augment, T. i. 887, iii. 

1509 ; ^er. enlarge, add to, HF. 2065. 
Eciiines, j-. pL sea-urchins, B 3. m 8. 20 

(Lat. echinis). 
Echoon, each one, L. 290; A 2655; 

Echone, />/. (?), all, every one, C 113. 
Edified, pp. built up, B 4. p 6, 284. 
Eek, adv. also, eke, moreover, A 5, 41. 
Eem, s. uncle, T. i. 1022. A. S. earn. 
Eest, adv. eastward, 3. 88. 
Eet, -e ; see Ete. 
Effect, s. deed, reality, T. i. 748 ; result, 

HF. 5; Theffect {for the effect), the 

sequel, L. 622 ; m effect, in fact, in 

reality, in practice, A 319. 
Eft, adv. again, A 1669; another time, 3. 

41. 
Eft-sone, adv. soon after, G 1288 ; im- 
mediately afterwards, I 89 ; soon after 

this, H 65 ; hereafter, G 933 ; again, B 

909 ; Eftsones, adv. very soon, L. 2322. 
Egral, adj. equal, T. iii. 137. 
Egal. adv. equally, T. iv. 660. 
Egalitee, s. equality, I 949. 
Egaly, adv. equably, B 2. p 4. 141 ; im- 

yjartially, B 5. p 3. 142. 
Egge, 3. edge, sharp side, T. iv. 927 ; sword, 

9. 19. 
Egg-eth, pr. s. incites, R. 182. 
Eg-g-ement, s. instigation, incitement, B 

842. 
Eg-g-ing, s. instigation, E 2135. 
Egle, s. eagle, HF. 499. 
Egre, adj. sharp, sour, R. 217; bitter, B 

2367 ; keen, I 117. 
Egrenaoine, s. agrimony, G 800. 
Egren, v. incite (lit. make eager), B 4. 

P 6. 335. 
Eig-hte, eighth, F 1280. 
Eightetene, eighteen, A 3223. 
Eightetetbe, ord. adj. eighteenth, B 5. 
Eir, .f. air, A 1246, 3473. 
Eisel, s. vinegar, R. 217. 
Ekko, s. echo, E 1189. 
Elde, s. old age, age, T. ii. 393, 399; long 

lapse of time, 7. 12. 
Elde, V. grow old, R. 396; pr. s. ages, 

makes old, R. 391. 
Elder, adj. older, B 1720, 3450. 
Elder-fader, s. grandfather, B 2. p 4. 

50- 
Eldres, p/. ancestors, B 3388. 



Eleccioun, s. choice, 5. 409, 621 ; election 

(in astrology), B 312, 
Elenge, adj. miserable, B 1412, D 1199. 
Elevat, pp. elevated, A. ii. 23. 29. 
Elf-queen, s. fairy-queen, B 1978, D 860. 
Ellebor, s. hellebore, Helleborus niger, B 

4154- 
Elles, adv. else, otherwise, 3. 997; eiles 

god forbede, God forbid it should be 

otherwise, G 1046. 
Elong-acioun, s. angular distance, A. ii. 

25_. 66. 
Elvish, adj. elvish, i. e. absent in demea- 
nour, B 1893; foolish, G 751, 842. 
Embassadrye, s. embassy, negociation, 

B 233. 
Embaume, v. embalm, L. 676; //. 

covered with balm, R. 1663. 
Embelif, adj. oblique, A. i. 20. 3; (as 

applied to angles) acute, A. ii. 26. 39, 

See the New E. Diet. 
Embelised, pp. beautified, B 2. p 5. 75. 
Embosed, pp. plunged deeply into the 

thicket, quite hidden, 3. 353. 
Embracing-e, s. embrace, I 944, 
Embrouded, //. embroidered, adorned,. 

A 89. 
Enabrouding-e, s. embroidery, I 417. 
Enibusshements,/'/.ambuscades,B2509, 
Emeraude, s. emerald, B 1799. 
Ernes, gen. uncle's, T. ii. 466. See Eem, 
Emforth, prep, as far as extends, to the 

extent of, A 2235. Evi- is from A. S. 

evin, for efen, even. 
Bmisperies, j./)/. hemispheres, A.i. 18.9. 
Empeireden, //.//. made worse, B 2209. 
Emplastre, 2 pr.pl. plaster over, bedaub, 

E 2207. 
Empoisoned, pp. poisoned, B 2519, 3850. 
Empoisoning-, s. poisoning, C 891. 
Empoysoner, s. poisoner, C 894. 
Emprenting-, s. impression, F 834. 
Emprinteth, imp.pl. impress, E 1193; 

Emprented,//>. imprinted, F 831; taken 

an impression of, E 21 17. 
Empryse, s. enterprise, undertaking, L. 

617, 1452. 
Empte, v. empty, make empty, G 741; 

//. as adj. exhausted, B i. p i. 10; worn 

out, shrunken (Lat. effeto), B i. m i. 20. 
Enbasshing'e, s. bewilderment, amaze- 
ment, B 4. p I. 43. 
Enbatailled, adj. embattled, R. 139. 
Enbibing, s. absorption, G 814. 
Enbrace, v. embrace, hold firmly, 21. ii ; 

Enbraced,/!/. surrounded, T. v. 1816. 
Enbrouden, v. embroider, L, 2351 ; pp. 

L. 119, 227. 



(§lo00arial hxiitx. 



37 



Bncens, s. incense, A 2429. 

Encense, v. to offer incense, G 395, 413. 

Enchantours, p/. wizards, I 603. 

Encliaufeth, pr. s. burns, B 5. m 3. 19. 

Enchaunten, v. enchant, T. iv. 1395. 

Eachesoun, s. occasion, reason, B 2783 ; 
cause, T. i. 681. 

Enclos, pp. enclosed, R. 138, 1652. 

Enclyning', s. inclination, HF. 734. 

Bncomberous, adj. cumbersome, op- 
pressive, burdensome, 18. 42; HF. 862. 

Encombraunce, J. encumbrance, E i960. 

En c ombre, v. encumber, L. 2006; pp. 
endangered, stuck fiist, A 508 ; ham- 
pered, R. 889; hindered, I 687; embar- 
rassed, weary, A 718. 

Encorporing, s. incorporation, G 815. 

Encrees, j-. increase, A 2184. 

Encrese, v, increase, 2. 103; Encressed, 
pp. E 408 ; enriched, B 1271. 

Endamag-en, v. harm, B i. p 4. 91 ; pp. 
compromised, B i. p i. 73. 

Ende, s. end, A 15; purpose, B 481; 
point, R. 973. 

Ended, pp. finite, B 2. p 7. 113. 

Endelees, ad/, infinite, H 322. 

Bndelong, adv. all along, A 2678 ; length- 
ways, A 1991. 

Endelong-, prep, all along, F 992 ; along, 
L. 1498 ; down along, F 416. 

Endentinge, s. indentation, I 417. En- 
dented or Indented is an heraldic term, 
signifying notched with regular and 
equal indentations. 

Bndere, s. cause of the end, A 2776; i. e. 
who dost end, C 218. 

Endetted, pp. indebted, G 734. 

Ending-day, s. death-day, 18. 55. 

Enditements, s. pi. indictments, I 800. 

Endlang-, adv. along, lengthways. See 
Endelong-. 

Bndouted, //. feared (with me'), R. 
1664. ' 

Endyte, v. write, dictate, A 95, 325 ; en- 
dite, compose, write, L. 414, 2356; re- 
late, G 80; tell, L. 1678; indict, B 3858; 
pp. related, B 3170. 

Bndyting", s. composing, 18. 'j'j ; pi. com- 
positions, I 1085. 

Bnfamyned, pp. starved, L. 2429. 

Enfecteth, pr. s. infects, L. 2242. 

Enforcen, ger. to enforce, B 2233 ; 
strengthen (your position) , D 340 ; i pr. 
s. refl,. insist, T. iv. 1016 ; Enforcen, pr. 
pi. gain strength, B 2355 ; imp, s. en- 
deavour, B 2237. 

Bnformed, pp. informed, E 738, F 335 ; 
instructed, I 658. 



Bnfortiined,//". s. endowed with powers, 

4. 259. 

Eng-endre, v. procreate, B 3148 ; pro- 
duce, B. 2582 ; V. beget, E 1272 ; pr. pi. 
are produced, B 41 13. 

Eng-endring-e, s. product, B 2580. 

Eng-endrure, s. procreation, B 3137; 
begetting, 5. 306; generation, D 128, 
134 ; progeny, offspring, I 621 ; frater- 
nity, I 375. 

English, s. power of expression in Eng- 
lish, L. 66. 

Engreggen, /r. jz)/. burden, I 979. 

Engyn, s. contrivance, T. iii. 274 ; device, 
R. 511 ; machine, F 184; skill, HF. 528. 

Engyned, pp. tortured, racked, B 4250. 

Enhabit, pp. devoted, T. iv. 443. 

Enhauncen, v. raise, A 1434; ger. to 
exalt, I 614; Enhaunceth, pr. s. elevates, 
I 730 ; pt. s. raised, B 2291 ; //. promoted, 
L. 1411. 

Enhaused, pp. elevated, lifted above 
(the horizon), A. ii. 26. 37. 

Enhausing, s. elevation, A. ii. 39. 26. 

Enhorte,^^r. to exhort, A 2851. 

Enlaceth, pr. s. entangles, B i. m 4. 
23 ; //. involved, made intricate, B 3. p 
8. 6. 

Enlumine, v. illumine, I 244; //. s. E 

33- 

Enluting, s. securing with ' lute,' daubing 
with clay, &c., to exclude air, G 766. 

Enoynt, pp. anointed, A 2961. 

Enpeiren, v. injure, B 4. p 3. 56. 

Enpoysoninge, j. poisoning, B i.p 3.59. 

Enprented, pp. imprinted, E 2178. 

Enpresse, v. make an impression on, 
21. 8. 

Enquere, v. enquire, A 3166; search 
into, B 629. 

Enqueringe, s. inquiry, B 888. 

Ensample, s. example, A 496, 505 ; pat- 
tern, 3. 911 ; warning, R. 1539; instance, 
R. 1584; in e., to signify, A. i. 21. 41; 
pi. examples, F 1419; cases, A 2842. 

Ensaumpler, s. prototype, B 3. m 9. 17. 

Enseigne, s. ensign, standard, R. 1200. 

Enseled, pp. sealed up, T. v. 151 ; fully 
granted, T. iv. 559. 

Entaile, s. cutting, intaglio-work, R. 108 1 ; 
Entayle, shape, description, R. 162. 

Entaile, v. carve, R. 609; pp. R. 140. 

Entalenten, pr. pi. stimulate, B 5. p 5. 6, 

Entame, v. re-open (lit. cut into), 1.79. 
O. F. entamer. 

Enteccheth, pr. s. infects, B 4. p 3. 83 ; 
pp. endued with (good) qualities, T. v, 
832. O. F. entechier, entachier. 



38 



(glogsarial hxHtx, 



Entencioun, s. intent, C 408 ; attention, 
T. i. 52; design, T. i. 211. 

Entende, v. attend, T. iii. 414; give 
attention to, D 1478 ; dispose oneself, 
F 689 ; ^er. to apply oneself, B 3498 ; 
to aim (after), incline (to), T. ii. 853; 
Entende, i pr. s. perceive, T. iv. 1649 ; 
attend, R. 597 ; pres. part, looking in- 
tently, B I. p 2. 3. 

Enteridement, s. perception, HF. 983. 

Entente, s. intention, intent, A 958, 1000; 
design, B 3835; wish, 18. 68; meaning, 
F 400, 959; attention, D 1374; endeav- 
our, G 6; feeling, 5. 532, 580; mmd, B 
1740; plan, B 147, 206; do thyn ^., give 
heed, 3. 752 ; as to co7nun e., in plain 
language, F 107. 

Ententeden, pi. pt. gave their attention, 

I- 1155- 
Ententif, Ententyf, adj. attentive, HF, 

1120; B 2205; eager, R. 685; diligent, 

R. 436; devoted, R. 339; careful, E 

1288. 
Ententifly, adv. attentively, HF. 616. 
Entermedled, //. intermixed, R. 906. 
Entraille, s. entrails, B 1763; inside, E 

Ii88. 
Entre, ^er. to enter, 5. 147, 153. In A. ii. 

44. 4, entere hit = set down in writing. 
Entrechaung-edenj/if. pi. interchanged, 

exchanged, T. iii. 1369; //. inter- 
changed, T. iv. 1043. 
Entrechaunging-es, s. pi. mutations, 

B I. m 5. 38; vicissitudes (Lat. uices), 

B 2, m 3. 20. 
Entrecomunen, v. intercommunicate, 

T. iv. 1354. 
Entrecomuninge, s. interchange, B 2. 

P 7- 63. 
Entredited, pp. interdicted, I 965. 
Entree, entry, entrance, R. 517, 530, 538; 

pi. entrances, HF. 1945. 
Entrelaced, />/. intricate, B 3. p 12. 166. 
Entrenaedled, pp. intermingled, HF. 

2124. 
Entremes, s. intervening course, 5. 665. 

'Entremets, certaine choice dishes 

served in between the courses of a 

feast ; ' Cotgrave. 
Entremette, v. refi. interfere, D 834; 

Entremeten (him), meddle with, 5. 515; 

i7np. s. take part (in), meddle (with), 

T. i. 1026. 
Entreparten, ger. to share, T. i. 592, 
Entreteden, pt. pi. treated of, discussed, 

B 2466. 
Entryketh, pr. s. hold fast in its subtle 

grasp, ensnares, 5. 403 ; Entryked, //. 



entrapped, R. 1642 ; ' Intriguer, to intri- 
cate, involve ; ' Cotgrave. 

Entune, v. intone, tune, T. iv. 4. 

Entunes, s.pl. tunes, 3. 309. 

Entysinge, s. allurement, I 353. 

Enveniminge, s. poisonous effect, E 
2060 ; poison, I 854. 

Envenyme, v. infect, D 474; //. B 3314. 

Environinge, s. surface, B 5. m 4. 172; 
circumference, B 4. p 6. 85. 

Enviroun, adv. roundabout, L. 300. 

Enviroune, v. encompass, B 3. m 9. 45 ; 
pres. part, skirting, going round, R. 526. 

Env61uped, //. enveloped, involved, C 
942. 
I Envye, s. envy, B 3584 ; longing, R. 1653 ; 
to e., in rivalry, 3. 173. 

Envye, v. vie, strive, 3. 406; vie (with), 
HF. 1231. 

Envyned, pp. stored with wine, A 342. 

Episicle, s. epicycle, A. ii. 35. 29. A 
small circle, the centre of which moves 
along the circumference of a larger one. 

Equacion, s. equal partition, A. ii. 37, 
24; Equacions, //. equations, F 1279; 
Equaciouns, A. ii. 36 (rubric) ; calcu- 
lations, A. i. 23. 5. By ' equations of 
houses ' is meant the division of the 
sphere into twelve equal portions (or 
' houses '), for astrological purposes. 

Equales, adj. pi. of equal length ; houres 
equates, hours each containing sixty 
minutes, A. ii. 8. 3. 

Equinoxial, s. equinoxial circle, B 4046. 

Er, adv. before, formerly, A 3789. 

Er, conj. before, A 1040, 1155; er that^ 
before, A 36. 

Er, prep, before, C 892 ; er tho, before 
then, L. 1062 ; er now, ere now, F 460. 

Erbe, s. herb, L. 109 a. 

Erbe yve, s. herb ive, ground ivy, Ajuga 
Chamaepitys, B 4156. 

Erber, s. arbour, L. 97 a. See Herber. 

Erchedeken, s. archdeacon, D 1300. 

Ere (eerg), s. ear, D 636; at ere, in (her) 
ear, T. i. 106. 

Ere, s. ear (of corn), L. 76. 

Ere {hx^),ger. to plough, A 886; //. HF. 
485. A. S. erian. 

Erl, s. earl, B 3597, 3646. 

Erme, v. feel sad, grieve, 3. 80; C 312. 
A. S. earmian, yrman. 

Ernestful, adj. serious, T. ii. 1727; E 

II75- 
Erratik, adj. wandering, T, v. 1812. 
Erraunt, adj. arrant, H 224; errant, 

stray (because near the middle of the 

chess-board), 3. 661. 



(glossarial Untiei. 



39 



Errest, 2.pr. s. wanderest, T. iv. 302. 
Ers, s. buttocks, A 3734. A. S. ears. 
Erst, adv. first, at first, HF. 2075; A 776; 

before, 16. 21; aforetime, R. 692; ai e., 

first, for the first time, B 1884, G 151 ; 

at last, T. i. 842; e. than, before, A 1566; 

loiig e. er, long first before, C 662. 
Erthes, s. pi. lands, countries, B i. 

ni 5. 61. 
Esciiaufen, ger. to burn ; //-. s. chafes, 

I 657 ; pp. heated, I 546. 
Eschauflng-e, s. heating, I 537 ; //. en- 
kindlings, I 916. 
Eschaunge, s. exchange, A 278; //. in- 

terchangings, HF. 697. 
Eschew, adj. averse, I 971; Eschu, E 

1812. 
Eschewe, v. escape; Eschue, v. avoid, 

T. ii. 696; A 3043; shun, G 4; 2 pr. pi. 

eschew, avoid, T, i. 344 ; Eschewed, pp. 

B 4528 ; imp. s. T. ii. 1018. 
Ese, s. ease, E 217, 434 ; amusement, 

delight, A 768, G 746 ; do yow e., give 

you pleasure, 6. 78 ; wel at e., fully at 

ease, T. ii. 750. 
Ese, V. ease, 3. 556; relieve, L. 1704; give 

ease (to) , R. 316 ; Esen,^,?r. to entertain, 

A 2194; pp. entertained, A 29. 
Esement, s. benefit, A 4179, 4186. 
Espace, s. space of time, B 2219. 
Especes, s.pl. kinds, varieties (of sin), I 

448. 
Espiaille, s. sets of spies, B 2509, D 1323. 
Espye, s. spy, T. ii. 1112. 
Espye, ger. to observe, R. 795 ; v. per- 
ceive, HF. 706; enquire about, B 180; 

look about, L. 858. 
Essoyne, s. excuse, I 164. Mod. E. essoin. 
Est, s. east, B 297, 493, 3657. 
Estableth, pr. s. settles, causes, B 4. p 

4-5I- 
Estat, s. state, condition, L, 125; rank, 

T. V. 1025; position, E 1969; Estaat, 

state, condition, rank, B 973, 3592, 3647; 

way, E 610 ; term of office, D 2018. 
Estatlich, adj. stately, dignified, A 140; 

suitable to one's estate, B 3902. 
Estatuts, s. ordinances, B 2. p i. 48. 
Estraunge, adj. strange, T. i. 1084. 
Estres, pi. inward parts, recesses (of 

a building), L. 1715; A 197 1 ; recesses, 

R. 1448 ; interior, A 4295. 
Esy, adj. easy, A 223 ; moderate, A 441 ; 

gentle, 5. 382. 
Ete, V. eat, A 947 ; Et,/r. s. eats, L. 1389 ; 

Eet, pt. s. ate, T. v. 1439; A 2048, 3421 ; 

Eete, pt. pi. ate, 9. 11; Ete, pt. pi. 3. 

432; Eten,//. eaten, A 4351. 



Eterne, adj. eternal, A 1109, 1990; s. 

eternity, T. iv. 978. 
Ethe, adj. easy, T. v. 850. 
Etik, the Ethics of Aristotle, L. 166. 
Evang-yle, s. gospel, R. 445 ; pi. B 666. 
Even, adj. even, equal, same, HF. 10; 

exact, R. 1350. 
Even, adv. exactly, 3. 441 ; evenly, D 

2249 ; regularly, R. 526 ; Evene joynant, 

closely adjoining, A 1060; /ul even^ 

actually, 3. 1329. 
Evene-cristene, s. fellow-Christian, I 

395. 805. 
Even-lyk, adj. similar, B 5. p 2. 25. 
Ever, adv. ever, always, A 50, &c. ; Ever 

in oon, always alike, continually, T. 

v. 451 ; incessantly, A 1771. 
Everich, each, A ii86; every, A 241; 

each one, A 371 ; every one, E 1017 ; 

e. of hem, either of the two, B 1004 ; 

Everich other, each other, 7. 53. 
Everichoon, every one, A 31, 747 ; each 

one, L. 2567 ; Everichone, pi. each one 

(of us), HF. 337; each of them all, all 

of them, T. iii. 412, 
Ever-mo, adv. for ever, always, con- 
tinually, L. 1239, 2035, 2634. 
Everydeel, adv. every whit, A 368, D 162 ; 

altogether, A 3303. 
Evidently, adv. by observation, A. ii. 23, 

rubric. 
Ew, s. yew-tree, A 2923 ; {collectively) yew- 
trees, R. 1385. 
Exaltacioun, s. (astrological) exaltation,, 

D 702, E 2224. 
Exaltat, as pp. exalted, D 704. 
Exametron, s. a hexameter, B 3169. 
Excusascioun, j.false excuse, 1 680 ; plea, 

I 164. 
Excuse, s. ; for myn e., in my excuse, 7. 

305- 
Executeth, pr. s. performs, A 1664 ; Exe- 

cut, pp. executed, T. iii. 622. 
Executour, s. executant, D 2010. 
Executrice, s. causer, T. iii. 617. 
Exercitacioun, s. exercise, B 4. p 6. 298. 
Existence, j^. reality, HF. 266. 
Exorsisaciouns, />/. exorcisms, spells to 

raise spirits, HF. 1263. 
Expans, adj. (calculated) separately, F. 

1275. See Atini expatisi. 
Expoune, v. explain. B 3398, G 86; Ex- 

pouned,//. s. B 3346, 3399. 
Expres, adj. expressed, made clear, D 

1 169. 
Expres, adv. expressly, C 182, D 719. 
Expresse,^^r. to declare, 17. 5 ; v. relate,. 

C 105. 



40 



(Slossarial hxUzx, 



Expulsif , adj. expellent, A 2749, 

Extender!,//-.//, are extended, B 461. 

Extree, s. axle-tree, A. i. 14. 2. 

Ey, s. egg, B 4035, G 806. 

Ey, interj. eh ! T. ii. 128 ; alas 1 T. iv. 1087 ; 
what! C 782. 

Eye, s. eye; at eye, evidently, L. 100; 
Eyen, //. eyes, i. 105 ; Eyen sight, eye- 
sight, D 2060. See Ye. 

Eyed, adj. endowed with eyes, T. iv. 1459. 

Eyle, V. ail, A 3424. 

Eyr, s. air, HF. 954 ; L. 1482 ; Eir, A 1246, 
3473 ; Eyre, dat. air, gas, G 767. 

Eyr, s. heir, L. 1598, 1819, 

Eyrish, adj. of the air, aerial, HF. 932, 965*. 

Eyse, s. ease, D 2101. See Ese. 



Face, .r. face, A 199, 458 ; a technical term 
in astrology, signifying the third part 
of a sign (of the zodiac), ten degrees in 
extent, F 50, 1288. 

Facound, adj. eloquent, 5. 521. 

Facounde, i-. eloquence, fluency, 3. 926; 
C50. 

Facultee, s. capacity, authority, or dis- 
position, A 244; branch of study, HF. 
248. 

Fade, adj. faded, R. 311. 

Fader, s. father, A 100 ; Fader, gen. A 
'j%\\ fader day, father's time, B 3374; 
fader kin, father's race, ancestry, G 829 ; 
pi. ancestors, E 61 ; originators, B 129. 

Fadme, pi. fathoms, A 2916. 

Fadres-in-lawe,jz^/. parents-in-law, B 2. 

P 3- 42. 

Faile, s. failure; rvitkouten f, without 
fail, 2. 48 ; sans faille, B 501. 

Fallen, v. fail, grow dim, 5. 85 ; pres.part. 
failing, remote, A. ii. 4. 30. 

Fair, adj. fine, D 2253 ; good, excellent, A 
154; a fair, a good one, A 165; as s., a 
fair thing, excellent thing (sarcasti- 
cally), T. iii. 850; voc. O fair one! HF. 
518; pi. A 234; clean, R. 571; specious, 

R. 437. 

Faire, adv. fairly, R. 774, 798 ; honestly, 
A 539 ; courteously, R. 592 ; clearly, D 
1142; prosperously, L. 186, 277. 

Falre, s. fair, market, B 1515. 

Falre Rewthelees, Fair Unpitying One, 
La Belle Dame sans Merci, 6. 31. 

Falrnesse, J. beauty, A 1098; honesty of 
life, A 519. 

Falr-Semblaunt, Fair-show, R. 963. 

Faldlng, s. a sort of coarse cloth, A 391, 
3212. 



Fallen, v. happen, T. iv, 976; light, E 
126; suit, E259; prosper, L. 186; pr.s. 
subj. may befall, R. 798 ; impcrs. may it 
befall, L. 277 ; pr. s. comes as by acci- 
dent, 6. 4; comes, 3. 706; suffers de- 
pression (an astrological term), D 702, 
705; Falles, /r. J. (Northern form), falls, 
A 4042 ; belongs, 3. 257 ; Fallen, pr. pi. 
happen, come to pass, R. 20; Fel, xpt.s. 
fell, 2. 15 ; Fil, //. s. fell, A 845 ; hap- 
pened, L. 589, 1162 ; was fitting, L. 2474 ; 
fil on slepe, fell asleep, HF. 114; fil of 
his accord, agreed with him, F 741; as 
fer as reson fil, as far as reason extended, 
F 570 ; Fille, i pt. pi. fell, became, D 
812; Fillen, //. //. fell, B 3183, 3620; 
Fille, /^.//. HF. i6c^q; fille in spechc ~ 
fell to talking, F 964; Falle, //. fallen, 
L. 1726, 1826; happened, A 324; acci- 
dentally placed, F 684; Falling, pres. 
pt. felling, causing to fall, T. ii. 1382. 

Fals, adj. false, 3. 618; false get, cheating 
contrivance, G 1277; voc. B 4416. 

Falsen, v. falsify, A 3175 ; deceive, L. 1640 ; 
betray, T. v. 1845 ; False, v. be untrue 
to, 3. 1234; //. falsified, broken (faith), 
F 627. 

Falwe, adj. fallow, yellowish, HF. 1936 ; 
A 1364. 

Falwes,//. fallow-ground, D 656. 

Fame, s. notoriety, A 3148; rumour, L. 
1242; good report, E 418; Fames, //, 
rumours, HF. 1292. 

Familer, s. familiar friend, B 4, p 6. 255. 

Famulier, adj. familiar, at home, A 215, 
B 1 221 ; of one's own household, E 1784 ; 
Famulere, affable, L. 1606. 

Pan. s. vane, quintain, H 42. 

Fanne, s. fan, A 3315. 

Fantastyk, adj. belonging to the fancy, 
A 1376. Used with reference to the 
portion of the brain in the front of the 
head. 

Fantasye, s. fancy, HF. 593; delight, A 
3191 ; imagining, HF. 992; fancy, pleas- 
ure, D 190; imagination, A 3835, 3840; 
imaginary object, 9. 51; desire, will, B 
3475 ; Fantasyes, pi. fancies, F 205 ; 
wishes, B 3465. 

Fant6me, s. phantasm, delusion, B 1037. 

Farced, pp. stuffed, L. 1373. 

Fare, s. behaviour, conduct, A 1809, B 
1453; condition, 2. 62; good speed, HF. 
682; business, goings-on, T. iii. 1106; 
bustle, ado, HF. 1065 ; company, T. iii. 
605 ; evel fare, ill hap, 2. 62. 

Faren, v. behave, T. iv. 1087; doth fare, 
cavises to behave or feel, T. i. 626; Fare, 



(glossatial Entiei. 



41 



ger. to go, travel, T. v. 21, 279; to pro- 
ceed. A 2435 ; Fare, i pr. s. go, G 733 ; it 
is with me (thus), 7. 320; am, B 1676; 
Farest, 2 pr. s. actest, 5. 599; art, HF. 
887 ; Fareth, pr. s. acts, D 1088 ; is, 3, 
113; happens, HF. 271 ; i pr.pl. Hve, G 
662; 2 pr. pi. behave, D 852; pr. pi. 
seem, I 414; Fare, pr. s. subj. may fare, 
F i<;79; Ferde, i p>t. s. fared, T. ii. 1006; 
felt, 3. 99, 785 ; was placed, 5. 152 ; pt. s. 
behaved, A 1372; happened, T. i. 225; 
was, R. 876; seemed, R. 249; went on, 
HF. 1522; Ferden, pt. pi. behaved, A 
1647 ; Ferde, pt. s. subj. should fare, R. 
271; Faren,//. fared, T. V. 466; D 1773 ; 
gone, B 4069 ; Fare, pp. fared, D 1782, 
gone, A 2436 ; walked, L. 2209 ; Ferd, 
//. fared, 1". iv. 1094; Y^x\wg&, pres.pt. 
as adj.; best f., best looking, fairest of 
behaviour, F 932 ; f. aright, prosper, T. 
i. 878; /ar w^/, farewell, B 116; Fareth, 
imp. pLfa.xe, E 1688 ; /. wel, farewell, T. 
V. 1412. 

Fare-cart, s. travelling cart, T. v. 1162. 

Fare-wel, interj. it is all over ! F 1204, G 
907 ; go far ewe I, be lost sight of, A. ii. 23. 
12. 

Farsed, pp. stuffed, A 233. 

Fasoun, s. fashion, appearance, R. 708 ; 
shape, R. 551. 

Fast, s. fasting, T. v. 370. 

Fast, adj. firm, 7. 313. 

Faste, adv. closely, R. 1346 ; close, near, 
A 1478; tight, R. 431; fast, quickly, T. 
i. 748; as f., very quickly, G 1235; hard, 
soundly, 5. 94; intently, eagerly, R. 
793 : f<^ste by, near to, A 1476 ; faste by, 
close at hand, 3. 369. 

Faster, adv. closer, B 3722. 

Fatte, V. fatten, D 1880. 

Faucon, s. falcon, F 411, 424. 

Fauconers, s.pl. falconers, F 1196. 

Fanned, //. s. fawned on, 3. 389. 

Faunes, pi. Fauns, A 2928. 

Fawe, adj. fain, glad, D 220. 

Fa"we, adv. fain, anxiously, T. iv. 887. 

Fay, s. ; see Fey. 

Fayerye, s. troop of fairies, E 2039; 
troops of fairies, D 859 ; enchantment, 
E 1743 ; Fairye, fairy-land, F 96 ; en- 
chantment, F 201 ; pi. fairies, D 872. 

Fayn, adj. glad, L. 130, 1137 ; fond, R. 1376. 

Fayn, adv. gladly, A 766 ; wolde f, 
would be glad to, E 696. 

Feblesse, s. weakness, T. ii. 863 ; I 1074. 

Fecches, pi. vetches, T. iii. 936. 

Fecchen, ger. to fetch, T. v. 485 ; ger. to 
fetch, to be brought (i. e. absent), T. iii. 



609; Fette, 2 pt. s. didst fetch, T. iii. 

723; //. s. fetched, L. 676; brought,!". 

V. 852 ; pt. pi. B 2041 ; Fet, //. fetched, 

A 2527 ; brought, A 819; brought home, 

D 217. 
Fecching, s. fetching, rape, T. v. 890. 
Pedde, //. s. fed, A 146. 
Fee, s. reward, pay, 7. 193 ; Fee simple, an 

absolute fee or fief, not clogged with 

conditions, A 319. 
Feeld, s. field, A 886, 3032 ; (in an heraldic 

sense), B 3573. 
Feendly, adj. fiendlike, devilish, B 751, 

783. 

Feet, s. performance, E 429. K. feat. 

Fette, V. enfeoff, endow, present, T. iii. 
901 ; ger. to present, T. v, 1689; pp. en- 
feoffed, put in possession, endowed, E 
1698. 

Fel, s. skin, T. i. 91. 

Fel, adj. dreadful, T. v. 50 ; cruel, A 2630 ; 
deadly, D 2002; terrible, B 2019; Felle, 
vflc. cruel, A 1559 ; destructive, T. iv. 44. 

Felawe, s. companion, comrade, A 395, 
648. 

Felaweshipe, s. partnership, A 1626; 
companionship, B 2749; company, A 26, 

Felawshipeth, pr. s. accompanies, B 4. 
m I. 12. 

Feld, pp. ofYeWe. 

Feldefare, s. field-fare, 5. 364 ; T. iii. 861 ; 
farewel f, i. e. farewell, and a good rid- 
dance ; because fieldfares depart when 
the warm weather comes. 

Felden, pt.pl. o/Felle. 

Fele, adj. many, R. 189; E 917. 

Felen, v. feel, experience, L. 692; Fele, 
understand by experiment, HF. 826; 
try to find out, T. ii. 387 ; Felte, i pt. s. 
4. 217; Felede, pt. s. G 521; Feled,//. 
perceived, T. iv. 984. 

Fele-folde, adj. manifold, B 2. p i. 16. 

Feling-, s. affection, 3. 1172. 

Felle,//. and voc. s. ofY^X, adj. 

Felle, V. fell, A 1702 ; Felden, /A//, caused 
to fall, R. 911; Feld, pp. cut down, A 
2924. 

Fellen, pt. pi. happened, T. i. 134. See 
Fallen. 

Felliche, adj. bitingly, severely, B 2. m 

3- 13- 

Felnesse, s. fierceness, B i. m-6. 11. 

Felon, adj. angry, T. v. 199. 

Felonous, adj. fierce, wicked, B i. m 4. 
15 ; mischievous, I 438. 

Felonye, s. injustice, B 4. p 6. 278 ; crime, 
A 1996; treachery, R. 165, 978; //. in- 
iquities, I 281. 



C 2 



42 



0\o&mtm\ Kntiex. 



Femele, adj. female, D 122, I 961. 
Femininitee, s. feminine form, B 360. 
Fen, s. chapter or subdivision of Avi- 

cenna's book called the Canon, C 890, 
Fenel, s. fennel, R. 731. 
Fenix, s. phoenix, 3. 982. 
Fer, adj. far, A 388, 491 ; Ferre, de/. A 

3393- 
Fer, adv. far, B 178 1 ; Fer ne ner, neither 

later nor sooner, A 1850; how f. so, how- 
ever far, 5. 440. 
Ferd, s. dat. fear, T. iv. 607. (Always in 

^^\-\\.forferd, ox for fer de.) 
Ferd, pp. <?/Fere, v. 
Ferd, -e ; see Faren, v. 
Fere, s. dat. fear, B 3369; panic, HF. 174. 
Fere, s. companion, L. 969; mate, 5. 410, 

416 ; wife, T. iv. 791 ; //. companions, T. 

i. 224. 
Fere, s. dat. fire, T. iii. 978. 
Fere, v. frighten, T, iv. 1483; Fered,//. 

afraid, G 924; Ferd,//. afraid, T. ii. 124. 
Ferforth, adv. far; as f. as, as far as, T. 

iv. 891 ; as long as, T. i. 121 ; so f. to 

such a degree, i. 170; thus f, thus far, 

T. ii. 960. 
Ferforthly, adv. thoroughly; so f, to 

such an extent, A 960 ; so far, L. 682 ; 

as f., as completely, D 1545. 
Ferfulleste, most timid, T. ii. 450. 
Ferly, adj. strange, A 4173. 
Fermacies, pi. remedies, A 2713. 
Ferme, adj. firm, E. 663. 
Ferme, imp. s. make firm, B i. m 5. 61 

(V.AX.firma'). 
Ferme, s. rent, A 252 b. 
Fermely, adv. firmly, T. iii. 1488. 
Fermerere, s. friar in charge of an infirm- 
ary, D 1859. 
Fermour, s. farmer of taxes, L. 378. 
Fern, adv. long ago ; so fern = so long 

ago, F 256. 
Fern-asshen, s. pi. ashes produced by 

burning ferns, F 254. 
Feme, pi. of Ferren, distant, remote, 

A 14. 
Feme ; fyere, last year, T. v. 1176. 
Ferre, adj. def. distant, A 3393. 
Ferre, coinp. adv. farther, HF. 600; 

Ferrer, A 835. 
Ferreste, superl.pl. farthest, A 494. 
Fers, s. queen (at chess), 3. 654, 655; 

Ferses, pi. the pieces at chess, 3. 723. 
Fers, adj. fierce, T. i. 225 ; voc. 7. i. 
Fersly, adv. fiercely, T. iii. 1760. 
Ferthe, fourth, T. iv. 26, v. 476. 
Ferther, adj. farther, B 1686, E 2226. 
Ferther, adv. further, i. 148, 3. 1254. 



Ferther-over, conj. moreover, A. ii. 26. 

13- 

Ferthing-, s. farthing, D 1967; a very 
small portion, A 134. 

Fery, adj. fiery, T. iii. 1600. 

Fest, s. fist, A 4275, C 802. 

Feste, s. feast, festival, A 883, B 418 ; to 
f, to the feast, B 380; encouragement, 
T. ii. 361 ; merriment, T. ii. 421 ; Maketh 
feste, flatters, 3. 638 ; pi. tokens of 
pleasure, T. v. 1429. 

Festeth, pr. s. feasts, A 2193. 

Festeyinge, pres. part, feasting, enter- 
taining, F 345. 

Festeyinge, s. festivity, T. v. 455. 

Festlich, adj. fond offcasts, F 281. 

Festne,^-^^-. to fasten, A 195. 

Fet ; see Fecchen. 

Fete, dat.pl. feet, 3. 199, 400, 502. 

Fether, s. wing, A 2144. 

Fetis, adj. neat, well-made, handsome, 
A 157; R. 776; splendid, R. 1 133; grace- 
ful, C 478. 

Fetisly, adv. elegantly, A 124, 273 ; neatly, 
trimly, A 3205, 3319; exquisitely, R. 

837. 

Fette ; see Fecchen. 

Fetys, ^^'. well-made, R. 532; handsome, 
R. 821; splendid, R. 1133; graceful, 
C 478. 

Fetysly, adv. exquisitely, neatly, R. 1235. 

Fey, s. faith, A 1126, 3284 ; fidelity, L. 778. 

Feyn, adj. glad, 7. 315. 

Feyne, v. feign, pretend, A 736; speak 
falsely, 2. 4; feyne us, feign, pretend, 
B 351; Feigne, who-so f. may, let him, 
who can, pretend, B 3. p 10. 93. 

Feynest, adv. rnost gladly, 5. 480. 

Feyning-, s. pretending, cajolery, F 556; 
pretence, feigning, L, 1556. 

Feynt, adj. feigned, R. 433. 

Feyntest, 2 pr. s. enfeeblest, B 926, 

Ficchen, ger. to fix, B 5. m 4. 18. 

Fiers, adj. fierce, A 1598 ; proud, R. 1482. 

Fifte, fifth, R. 962, 982; 16. 9. 

Figes, //. fig-trees, R. 1364. 

Fighten, v. fight, L. 1996; Fight, pr. s. 
fights, 5. 103 ; Faught, pt. s. fought, A 
399 ; Foughten, pp. A 62. 

Figlire, s. shape, 16, 27 ; form (as a man), 
B3412; figure, 1.94; figure (of speech), 
A 499; Figure, type, i. 169; //. figures 
(of speech), E 16; markings, A. pr. 75. 

Figuringe, s. form, L. 298; figure, G 96. 

Fil, pt. s. 0/ Fallen. 

Fild, pp. filled, 5. 610. 

Finch, s. finch (bird), R. 915; pulle a 
finch, pluck a dupe, A 652. 



({^lossarial Intiex, 



43 



Pinde, v. find, i. 72; A 648; invent, 

A 736 ; j°^er. to provide for, C 537 ; Fint, 

pr. s. finds, G 218 ; Fynt, pr. s. L. 1499; 

Fond, pt. s. discovered, A 2445 ; found 

out, T. i. 659 ; provided for, B 4019 ; 

Fonde, //. s. subj. could find, 5. 374; pp. 

found, E 146; Founden, //. found, 

B 612 ; provided, B 243. 
Finding', s. provision, A 3220. 
Fint, pr. s. finds, G 218. 
Firre, s. fir-tree, A 2921. 
Firste, adj. def. first, 3. 11 66; my firste, 

my first narration. F 75; with the firste, 

very soon, T. iv, 63. 
Fish^ s. the sign Pisces, F 273. 
Fit, J. a ' fyt ' or ' passus,' a portion of 

a song, B 2078 ; bout, turn, A 4184. 
Fithele, s. fiddle, A 296. 
Fixe, pp. as adj. fixed, T. i. 298 ; solidified, 

G779. 
Flambe, s. fiame, I 353. 
Flatour, s. flatterer, B 4515. 
Flaumbe, s. flame, HF. 769. 
Flayn, pp. flayed, I 425. 
Fledde, pt. s. fled, avoided, B 3445, 3874; 

Fledde herself, took refuge, L. 1225. 
Flee (i), V. fly, F 503; leet fiee, let fly, 

A 3806; Fleigh, pt. s. flew, HF. 921, 

2087; Fley, //. J. B4362; Flowen, pt.pt. 

flew, B 4581 ; pp. flown, HF. 905. 
Fleen (2) , t/. escape, A 1170; flee, L. 1307, 

2020; Fleeih, imp. pt. 4.6; Fleigh,/^. .f. 

fled, B 3879. 
Fleen, s.pt. fleas, H 17. 
Flees, s. fleece, L. 1428, 1647. 
Fleet, pr. s. floats, B 463. 
Flekked, pp. spotted, E 1848, G 565. 
Flemen, ^^r. to banish, T. ii. 852;/?-. j. 

H 182; pp. banished, G 58. 
Flenaer, s. banisher, driver away, B 460. 
Fleming-e, s. banishment, flight, T. ill. 

933- 

Flen, pr.pt. fly, T. iv, 1356. 

Fleshly, a^z/. carnally, B 1775. 

Flete, V. float, bathe, T. iii. 1971 ; ipr. s. 
subj. may float, A 2397 ; Fleteth, pr. s. 
floats, B 901 ; flows, abounds (Lat, in- 
jluat), B I. m 2. 28; Fleet, /r. J. floats, 
B 463 ; pres. pt. floating, A 1956 ; Flet- 
mgQ, pres. pt. flowing, B i. p 3. 78 (Lat. 
limphante) . 

Flex, s. flax, A 676. 

Fley, pt. s. flew, B 4362. 

Flikered, pt. s. fluttered, T. iv. 1221 ; 
pres. pt. pi. fluttering, A 1962. 

Flitte, V. pass away, I 368 ; pp. removed, 
T. V. 1544; pres.pt. unimportant, 3. 801. 

Flo, s. arrow, H 264. 



Floknaele, adv. in a flock, in a great 

number, E 86. 
Flood, s. flood-tide, F 259; on a fi., in 

a state of flood, T, iii. 640. 
Florisshinges,//. florid ornaments, HF. 

1301. 
Florouns, s. pi. florets, L. 217, 220. 
Floteren, pr. pi. fluctuate, waver, B 3. 

p II. 227. 
Flotery, adj. fluttering, wavy, A 2883. 
Floug-h, 2pt. s. didst fly, B 4421. 
Flour, J. (i) flower, L. 48; of allefioures 

fiour, flower of all flowers, i. 4; flower, 

i. e. choice, A 4174; choice part, A 982; 

time of flourishing, A 3048 : (2) flour, 

R. 356. 

Flour-de-lys, s. fleur-de-lis, lily, A 238. 

Floureth, pr. s. flourishes, T. iv. 1577 ; 
blooms, 7. 306. 

Flourettes, s. pi. flowerets, buds, R. 891. 

Floury, adj. flowery, 3. 398, 

Floute, s. flute, HF. 1223. 

Floutours, pi. flute-players, R. 763. 

Flowen, pt.pl. and pp. ^/ Flee (i). 

Floytingej/r^j.//. playing on the flute, 
A 91. 

Fneseth, pr. s. breathes heavily, puffs, 
snorts, H 62. 

Fo, s. foe, enemy, B 1748 ; Foo, A 63 ; 
Foon,/>/. B 3896; Yoos,pl. B 2160. 

Fode, s. food, D 1881, I 137. 

Foisoun, s. plenty, abundance, R. 1359. 

Folde, s. fold, sheepfold, A 512. 

Folden,//, folded, T. iv. 359, 1247. 

'Fo\e<l, pp. foaled, born, D 1545. 

Folily, adv. foolishly, B 2639. 

Folk, s. folk, people, A 12, 25 ; sort, com- 
pany, 5. 524; //. companies, 5. 278. 

Folowed "wel, followed as a matter of 
course, 3. 1012; Folweth, imp. pi. imi- 
tate, E 1189. 

Foljr, adv. foolishly, 3. 874. 

Folye, s. folly, foohshness, A 3045. 

Folyen, pr. pi. act foolishly, B 3. p 2. 
100. 

Fomen, //. foe-men, T. iv. 42. 

Fomy, adj. foaming, covered with foam, 
A 2506. 

Fond ; pt. s. of Finde. 

Fonde, v. endeavour, R. 1584 ; v. attempt, 
try, E 283 ; try to persuade, B 347. 

Fonde,//. s. subj. could find, 5. 374. 

Fonge, V. receive, B 377, 

Fonne, .f. fool (Northern), A 4089. 

Font-ful water, fontful of water, B 357. 

Fontstoon, s. font, B 723. 

Foo ; see Fo. 

Foo, -f. ioo',for foot, A 3781. 



44 



(glo00arial hxtitx. 



Fool, adj. foolish, silly, R. 1253, 

Fool, s. fool, A 3005; jester, B 3271; pi. 

wicked persons, E 2278. 
Fool-large, adj. foolishly liberal, B 2789, 

2810. 
Fool-largesse, j. foolish liberality, I 813. 
Foom, s. foam, A 1659, G 564. 
Foo-raen, ^./Z. foes, B 3255, 3507. 
Foon, Foos ; see Fo. 
Foot, as p/. feet, A 4124. 
Foot-brede, s. foot-breadth, HE. 2042. 
Foot-hot, adv. instantly, on the spot, 

B438. 

Foot-mantel, s. foot-cloth, ' safeguard ' to 
cover the skirt, A 472. 

For, prgp. for, A 486, &c. ; in respect of, 
5. 336 ; by reason of, R. 1564 ; for the 
sake of, B 4. p 6. 190 ; /or me, by my 
means, T. ii. 134 ; for which, wherefore, 
F 1525 ; against, to prevent, in order 
to avoid, L. 231 ; for fay ling, to prevent 
failure, T. i. 928 ; in spite of, C 129 ; for 
al, notwithstanding, A 2020; for my 
dethe, were I to die for it, 4. 186; to 
have for excused, to excuse, A. pr. 31. 

For, conj. for, A 126, &c. ; because, 3. 735, 
789 ; in order that, B 478, E 102. 

For to, with infin. in order to, to, A 13, 
78. &c. 

Fordge, s. provision of fodder, E 1422; 
food, B 1973 ; winter-food, as hay, &c., 
A 3868. 

For-bede, v. forbid, T. iii. 467; For- 
bedeth, pr. s. B 2774; Y oxbeX, for Eor- 
bedeth,/r. s. forbids, T. ii. 717; in phr. 
god f., or Crist f. = God forbid, Christ 
forbid, T. ii. 113, 716; Eorbad, pt. s. 
E 570 ; Eorbode, pp. forbidden, E 2206. 

Forbere, v. forbear (to mention), A 885; 
leave (him) alone, D 665 ; spare, A 3168 ; 
little consider, T. ii. i66o ; Forbar, pt. 
s. forbare, T. i. 437 ; imp. pi. forgive, L. 
80. 

For-blak, adj. extremely black, A 2144. 

Forbode, s. prohibition ; goddes forbode, 
it is God's prohibition (i. e. God forbid), 
L. 10 a. 

Forbrak, i //. s. broke olT, interrupted, 
B 4. p I. 7. 

For-brused, pp. badly bruised, B 3804. 

Forby, adv. by, past, L, 2539. 

Forbyse, ger. to instruct by examples, T. 
ii. 1390. (A false form; iox forbisne{n), 
the former ii being dropped by confusion 
with that in the suffix.) 

Force ; see Fors. 

Forcracchen,^<?r. to scratch excessively, 
R. 323. 



Forcutteth,//'. s. cuts to pieces, H 340. 

For-do, v. destroy, ' do for,' T. i. 238, iv. 
168 1 ; For-dide,//. s. slew, L. 2557; For- 
doon, pp. overcome, vanquished, T. i. 
525 ; ruined, T. v. 1687 ; destroyed, H 
290; slain, L. 939. 

Fordriven, //. driven about, B i. p 3.71. 

For-dronken, //. extremely drunk, A 
3120, 4150. 

Fordrye, adj. very dry, withered up, 
F 409. 

Fordwyned, adj. shrunken, R. 366. 

Fore, s. path, trace of steps, D no; 
course, track, D 1935. A. S. for. 

Foreyne, adj. extraneous, B 3. p 3. 73. 

Foreyne, s. outer chamber (or court- 
yard ?) , L. 1962. 

Forfered, pp. exceedingly afraid; for- 
fered of— very afraid for, F 527. 

Forfeted,//. s. did wrong, I 273. 

Forgaf , //. s. of Foryeve. 

Forgat, pt. s. of Foryete. 

Forgift, J. forgiveness, L. 1853. 

For-go, pp. overwalked, exhausted with 
walking, HE. 115. 

Forgon, ger. to give up, forego, {better 
forgo), T. iv. 195 ; lose, R. 1473 ; Forgoon, 
pp. lost, B 2183. 

Forheed, s. forehead, R. 860; Forheved, 
B I. p 4. 139. 

For-hoor, adj. very hoary, R. 356. 

Forkerveth, pr. s. hews in pieces, H 340. 

Forlaft,//. abandoned, C 83. 

Forleseth, //-. s. loses, I 789. See For- 
lorn. 

For-leten, v. abandon, give up, C 864; 
yield up, B 1848 ; Forlete, pr. pi. for- 
sake, I 93 ; Forleten, pp. abandoned, 
given up, HF. 694. 

Forliven, v. degenerate, B 3. p 6. 56; 
Forlived, //. as adj. degenerate, ignoble, 
B 3. m 6. 13. 

Forlorn, pp. utterly lost, L. 2663. See 
Forlese. 

Forlost,//. utterly lost, T. iii. 280. 

Forloyn, s. note on a horn for recall, 3. 
386. 

Forme, s. form, A 305; form, lair (of 
a hare), B 1294. 

Forme-fader, s. fore-father, first father, 
B 2293. 

Formel, s. companion (said of birds), 
5. 371, 373. 

Formely, adv. formally, T. iv. 497. 

Former, s. Creator, C 19. 

Former age, the Golden Age of old, 9. 2. 

Formest, adj. sup. foremost, 3. 890. 

Forn-cast, pp. premeditated, B 4407. 



(©lossarial Intiei. 



45 



Forneys, s. furnace, A 202, 559. 

For-old, i7d/. extremely old, A 2124. 

Forpampred,,//. exceedingly pampered, 
spoilt by pampering, 9. 5. 

For-pyned, pp. wasted away (by torment 
or p/ fie), A 205. 

Fors, s. force, A 2723; no for s, no matter, 
no consequence, A 2723, B 285 ; no force, 
no matter, 18. 53; 710 fors is, it is no 
matter, T. iv. 322; no force of no matter 
for, 10. 13 ; no fors of me, no matter 
about me, 4. 197 ; thereof no fors, never 
mind that, 3. 1170; make no fors, pay 
no heed, H 68 ; I do no fors, I care not, 
D 1254 ; / do no fors thereof, it is nothing 
to me, 3. 542 ; doth no fors, takes no ac- 
count, I 711; what fors, what matter, 
T. ii. 378. 

Forsake, v. deny, B i. p 4. 164; leave, 
B 3431 ; Forsook,//, s. forsook, R. 1538 ; 
Forsaken, //. R. 1498 ; imp. pi. give up, 
C 286. 

Forseid, pp. as adj. aforesaid, 5. 120. 

Forseinge, s. prevision, T. iv. 989. 

Forshapen, pp. metamorphosed, T. ii. 66. 

For-shright, pp. exhausted with shriek- 
ing, T. iv. 1147. 

For-sight, s. foresight, T. iv. 961. 

For-sleuthen, v. waste in sloth, B 4286. 

Forsleweth,/r. s. wastes idly, I 685. 

Forsluggeth, /r. s. spoils, allows (goods) 
to spoil, I 685. 

Forsong-en, pp. tired out with singing, 
R. 664. 

Forster, s. forester, A 117. 

Forstraug-ht, pp. distracted, B 1295. 

Forswor him, pt. s. was forsworn, HF. 
389 ; Forswore, pp. falsely sworn by, L. 
2522; Forsworn, forsworn, L. 927. 

Forth, adv. forth, on, further, onward, 5. 
27 ; D 1569, F 604, 605, 964 ; forward, 
HF. 2061; out, 5. 352; continually, F 
108 1 ; away, T. i. 118; still, 4. 148; tho 
f, thenceforth, T. i. 1076 ; forth to love, 
i. e. they proceed to love, T. ii. 788. 

Forther, adv. more forward, A 4222 ; 
Further, (go) further, A 4117. 

Fortheren, ger. to further, T. v. 1707. 

Forthering-, s. furtherance, aid, L. 69 a. 

Porther-moor, adv. further on, A 2069 ; 
Forthennore, moreover, C 357. 

Forther-over, adv. moreover, C 648. 

Forthest, adj. and adv. furthest, B 4. p 6. 
136. 

For-thinke, v. seem amiss, {or here) seem 
serious, T. ii. 1414 ; pr. s. impers. seems 
a pity (to me), E 1906; Forthoughte, 
pt. s, subj. should displease, R. 1671. 



Forthren, ger. to further, help, assist, 

L. 71, 472, 1618 ; ger. to further, T. v. 

1707. 
Forth-right, adv. straightforwardly, 

straightforward, R. 295 ; F 1503. 
Forthward, adv. forwards, B 263, F 1169. 
For-thy, adv. therefore, on that account, 

A 1841, 4031. 
Fortroden, pp. trodden under foot, I 

190. 
Fortuit, adj. fortuitous, B 5. p i. 91. 
Fortuna maior, a name for the auspicious 

planet Jupiter, T. iii. 1420. (Or else, 

a cluster of stars near the beginning of 

Pisces ; cf. Dante, Purg. xix. 4.) 
Fortunel, adj. accidental, B 5. m i. 16. 
j Fortunen, v. to give (good or bad) 

fortune to, A 417 ; Fortunest, 2 pr. s. 

renderest lucky or unlucky, A 2377 ; pt. 

pi. happened, chanced, 3. 288 ; pp. en- 
dowed by fortune, 4. 180. 
Fortunous, adj. fortuitous, accidental, 

B I. p 6. 9. 
For-waked, pp. tired out with watching, 

3. 126 ; B 596. 
Forward, adv. foremost; frst and f, 
I first of all, B 2431. 
I Forward, s. agreement, covenant, A 33, 

829. 
Forwelked, adj. withered, wrinkled, 

deeply lined, R. 361. 
Forweped, pp. weary, exhausted through 

weeping, 3. 126. 
Forwered, pp. worn out, R. 235. 
For-wery, adj. very tired, 5. 93. 
Forwes, //. furrows, 9. 12. 
For-why, conj. for what reason, T. iii. 

1009 ; wherefore, why, HF. 20 ; because, 

3-461, 793. 
For-witer, s. foreknower, B 5. p 6. 329. 
Forwiting, s. foreknowledge, B 4433. 
For-wot, pr. s. foreknows, foresees, HF. 

45- 
Forwrapped, pp. wrapped up, C 718 ; 

concealed, I 320. 
For-yede, pt. s. gave up, T. ii. 1330. 
Foryelde, v. yield in return, requite, E 
i 831. 

! Foryetelnesse, s. forgetfulness, I 827. 
i Foryeten, v. forget, T. iii. 55 ; pr. s. for- 
j gets, T. ii. 375; Forget, for Forgeteth, 
j pr. s. forgets, R. 61 ; Forgat, i //. s. 
forgot, C 919 ; For-yat, pt. s. T. v. 1535 ; 
For-yeten, pp. forgotten, A 2021 ; For- 
geten, pp. B 2602. 
Foryetful, adj. forgetful, E 472. 
! Foryetinge, s. forgetfulness, B 2. p 7, 98. 
i Foryeve, v. forgive, B 994; Foryaf,//. s. 



46 



(^lossarial hxhtx. 



forgave, T. iii. 1129, 1577; Forgaf, pf. s. 

L. 162; Foryeve, //. //. L. 1848; For- 

yeven.pp. forgiven, T. ii. 595. 
Foryifnesse, s. forgiveness, B 2963. 
Fostreth, />/-. s. cherishes, E 1387; 

Fostred, //. s. nourished, fed, kept, 

E 222, H 131 ; pp. nurtured, nourished, 

C 219. 
Fostring, s. nourishment, D 1845. 
Fote, s. foot, short distance, F 1177; daf. 

L. 2711; Ai?n to /., at his foot, L. 1314; 

on /., on foot, F 390. 
Fother, s. load, properly a cart-load, A 

530 ; great quantity, A 1908. 
Fot-hoot, adv. hastily, immediately, 3. 

375- 
Foudre, s. thunderbolt. HF. 535. 
Foughten, //. fought, A 62. 
Foul, f. bird, F 149 ; pi. birds, L. 37, 130. 
Foule, adv. vilely, D 1069; foully, 3. 623 ; 

5. 517; evilly, A 4220; shamefully, L. 

1307 ; hideously, D 1082 ; meanly, R. 

1061. 
Fouler, adj. cotnp. uglier, D 999. 
Fouler, s. fowler, L. 132. 
Founde {i),g<:r. to found, T. i. 1065. 
Founde (2), v. seek after, 7. 241 ; i /;-. s, 

try, endeavour, 7, 47. 
Foundement, s. foundation, HF. 1132. 
Foundred, //. s. foundered, stumbled, 

A 2687. 
Founes, s. pi. fawns, 3. 429; Fownes 

{metaphorically) , young desires, T. i. 465. 
Fourneys, s. furnace, B 3353. 
Fourtenight, fourteen nights, a fort- 
night, T. iv. 1327. 
Fowel, 5. bird, A 190, 2437. 
Foyne, pr. s. imp. let him thrust, A 2550; 

p)-. s. A 2615 ; pr. pi. A 1654. 
Foyson, s. abundance, plenty, A 3165. 
Fraknes, pi. freckles, A 2169. 
Frame, j^^er. to put together, build, T. iii. 

530- 

Franchyse, s. liberality, E 1987 ; noble- 
ness, F 1524 ; privilege, I 452. 

Frankeleyn, s. franklin, freeholder, A 

331- 

Frankes, pi. franks, B 1371, 1377. 

Frape, s. company, pack, T. iii. 410. 
O. F. prafe, troop. 

Fraught, pp. freighted, B 171 ; han doon 
fr., have caused to be freighted. 

Frayneth, pr. s. prays, beseeches, B 1790. 

Free, adj. liberal, generous, B 1366, 1854; 
bounteous, liberal, 3. 484; noble, beau- 
tiful, C 35 ; profuse, lavish, A 4387 ; as 
s. noble one, 6. 104, 

Freedom, s. Uberalitv, L. 1127. 



Freele, adj. frail, fragile, I 1078. 

Freend, s. friend, A 670. 

Freendlich, adj. friendly, A 2680, 

Freletee, s. frailty, C 78, D 92. 

Fremede, adj. foreign ; Fremed {be/ore a 
vowel), strange, wild; fremed and tame, 
wild and tame, every one, T. iii. 529 ; 
Fremde, foreign, F 429. A. S. fremede. 

Frenesye, s. madness, D 2209. 

Freaetyk, adj. frantic, T. v. 206. 

Frenges. pi. fringes, D 1383 ; borderings, 
HF. 13 1 8. 

Frere, s. friar, A 208, D 829. 

Fresshe, adv. newly, L. 204. 

Fresshe, v. refresh. R. 1513. 

Fret, s. ornament, L. 215, 225, 228. 

Freten, v. eat (governed by saugh) , A 
2019 ; pr. s. devours, R. 387 ; pt. pi. con- 
sumed. D 561 ; Freten. pp. eaten, de- 
voured, A 206S ; Frete,/"/. B 475. 

Fretted,//, adorned, set, L. 1117. 

Freyne, v. ask, question, T. v. 1227 ; //. s. 
B 3022 ; //. G 433. 

Fro, prep, from, A 44; out of, 4. 254; to 
and fro, L. 2358, 2471. 

Frog-g-es, //. frogs, R. 1410. 

From, prep, from, A 128 ; apart from, T. 
iv. 766 ; from the time that, R. 850. 

Frosty, adj. frosty, cold, A 268; which 
coines in the winter, 5. 364. 

Frote, ger. to rub, T. iii. 1115; pr. s. A 

37A7- 
Frothen, pr, pi. become covered with 
foam, A 1659. 
j Fro-this-forth, henceforward, T. iv. 314. 
1 Frounced, adj. wrinkled, R. 365. 
i Frounceles, adj. unwrinkled. R. 860. 
I Frount, s. true countenance, B 2. p 8. 7. 
j Fructuous, adj. fruitful, I 73. 
, Fruit, 5. fruit, i. 38 ; result, F 74. 
Fruytesteres, s. pi. fem. fruit-sellers, C 

478. 
Frye, v. fry, A 383, D 487. 
Fugitif, adj. fleeing from {1^?lX. profugus) , 

HF. 146. 
Ful, adj. satiated, T. iii. 1661 ; atte fulle, 

at the full, completely. A 651. 
Ful, adv. fully, F 1230; very, quite, B 

3506, F 52 ; /; many, very many, F 128. 
FulfiUe, V. fulfil, 6. 17; Fulfelle (Kentish 
form).^^r. T. iii. 510; Fulfuldest. 2 pt. s. 
didst satisfy, B 2. p 3. 66 ; Fulfilled, //. 
quite full. L. 54. 
Fulsomnesse, s. copiousness, excess, F 

405- 

Fume, s. vapour, B 41 14. 

Fumetere, s. fumitory, Fumaria offici- 
nalis, B 4153. 



({^losgarial InHtx, 



47 



Fumositee, s. fumes arising from drunk- 
enness, C 567, F 358. 

Fundement (i), .«•' foundation, D 2103; 
(2) fundament, C 950. 

Funeral, adj. T. v. 302; funereal, A 2864, 
2912. 

Furial, adj. tormenting, furious, F 448. 

Furie, s. monster, A 2684; rage, T. v.212. 

Furlong-s, p/. furlongs, A 4166 ; Furlong- 
wey, a short distance, B 557; Forlong- 
wey, a brief time (lit. time of walking 
a furlong, 25 minutes), T. iv. 1237. 

Furre, s. fur, R. 228. 

Furred, />/. furred, trimmed with fur, 
R. 227, 408, 

Furriuge, s. fur-trimming, I 418. 

Further-over, moreover, 2. 85. 

Furthre, ^<?r. to help, HF. 2023; pp. ad- 
vanced, 7. 273. 

Fusible, adj^ capable of being fused, 
G 856. 

Fustian, s. fustian, A 75. 

Futur, adj. future, T. v. 748. 

Fyle, V. file, smoothe by filing, 5. 212; 
Fyled, pp. A 2152. 

Fyn, s. end, R, 1558 ; death, T, ii. 527 ; 
result, B 3348, 3884; aim.E 2106; object, 
r. ii. 425, iii. 553; for fyn, finally, T. iv. 

477- 
Fyn, adj. fine, strong, A 1472; of fyne 

force, of very need, T. v. 421. 
Fyne, v. finish, T. iv. 26 ; cease, end, T. ii. 

1460. 
Fynt, pr. s. finds, A 4071 ; Fint, G 218. 
Fyr, s. fire, B 3734 ; Fyr of Seint Antony, 

erysipelas, I 427. 
Fyr-makinge, s. making of the fire, A 

2914. 
Fysicien, s. physician, B i. p 3. 4. 



G. 



Gabbe, ^^/-. to boast, prate, A 3510 ; \pr. s. 

lie, speak idly, 3. 1075 ; Gabbestow, liest 

thou, T. iv. 481. 
Gabber, s. liar, idle talker, I 89. 
Gable, s. gable-end, A 3571. 
Gadeling, s. idle vagabond, gad-about, R. 

938. 
Gadereth, pr. s. gathers, A 1053. 
Gadering-e, s. gathering, B 2765. 
Gaillard, adj. joyous, merry, lively, A 

4367- 
Galantyne, s. a kind of sauce, galantine, 

9. 16 ; 12. 17. 
Galaxye, s. the Galaxy, Milkv Way, 5. 

56; HF.936. 



Gale, V. sing, cry out, D 852; pr. s. stibj. 
exclaim, D 1336. 

Galianes, s. pi. medicines, C 306. So 
named after Galen. 

Galingale, s. sweet cyperus, A 381. (A 
spice was prepared from the root of the 
plant.) 

Galle, s. sore place, D 940. 

Galles, pi. feelings of envy, 9. 47. 

Galoche, s. a shoe, F 555. 

Galoun, s. gallon, H 24. 

Galping,//r.f.//. gaping, F 350. 

Gal^wes, s.pl. gallows, B 3924. 

Gamed, pt. s. impers. it pleased, A 534. 

Gauien, s. game, sport, T. ii. 38, iii. 250 ; 
joke, jest, E 733 ; amusement, fun, merri- 
ment, A 2286, 4354. 

Gan, pt. s. of Ginne. 

Ganeth,/r. s. yawneth, H 35. 

Gape, V. gape, gasp, B 3924; Gapeth,/n 
s. opens his mouth, L. 2004; Gape {^also 
Cape),/r./i/. gape, stare, A 3841. 

Gapinges, s.pl. greedy wishes, B 2. m 2. 
17 (Lat. hiatus). 

Gappe, s. gap, A 1639, 1645. 

Gardin-wal, s. garden-wall, A 1060. 

Gardinward, adv. gardenward ; to the g., 
towards the garden, F 1505. 

Gargat, s. throat, B 4524. 

Garleek, s. garlick, A 634. 

Garnement, s. garment, R. 896. 

Garnere, s. garner, granary, R. 1148. 

Garnisoun, s. garrison, B 2217. 

Gas, pr. s. goes (Northern), A 4037. 

Gastly, adv. terrible, A 1984. 

Gastnesse, s. terror, B 3. p 5. 29. 

Gat,//, s. c>/Geten. 

Gat-tothed, adj. having the teeth far 
apart, A 468, D 603. 

Gaude, .r. gaud, toy, pretence, T. ii. 351 ; 
trick, C 389; pi. pranks, I 651. 

Gaud6, adj. dyed with weld, A 2079. Fr. 
gauder, to dye with weld. 

Gauded, pp. furnished with beads called 
gauds, A 159. (The bead or gaud was 
formerly called gaudee, from Lat. imp. 
^^\. gaudete^ 

Gaure, v. stare, T. ii. 1157; ger. to stare, 
gaze, A 3827. 

Gay, adj. finely dressed, A 74, iii ; joyous, 
R. 435 ; wanton, A 3769. 

Gaylard, adj. lively, A 3336. 

Gayler, s. gaoler, A 1064. 

Gayneth, pr. s. avails, A 1176 ; pt. s. pro- 
fited, T. i. 352. 

Gaytres beryies, berries of the gay-tree 
or gait-tree (goat-tree), berries of the 
Rhamnus catharticus, or buckthorn, B 



48 



(glo00arial Kntiei. 



4155. Called getbars trd, goat-berry-tree, 
in Swedish dialects (Rietz). 

Geaunt, s. giant, B 1997, 3298. 

Gebet, s. gibbet, gallows, HF. 106. 

Geen, pp, gone (Northern), A 4078. 

Geeth, jz>^. j. goes, L. 2145. 

Generally, adv. everywhere, T. i. 86. 

Gent, adj. refined, exquisite, noble, B 
1905; slim, A 3254; fern, graceful, R. 
1032. 

Genterye, s. nobility, magnanimity, L. 
394; gentility, D 1146; gentle birth, I 
452 ; rank, I 461 ; sign of good birth, 
I 601. 

Gentil, adj. gentle, refined, A 72; gentle, 
worthy, B 1627; excellent, A 718; mild 
in manner, compassionate, A 647 ; well- 
bred, D III; beautiful, R. 108 1 ; charm- 
ing, R. 1016. 

Gentillesse, s. gentleness, noble kindness, 
courtesy, good breeding, L. 610, loio, 
1080 ; A 920 ; nobility, B 3854 ; gentility, 
D 1 109; worth, E 96; kindness, G 1054; 
condescension, B 853 ; high birth, I 585 ; 
slenderness, symmetry, F 426 ; delicate 
nurture, E 593. 

Gentilleste, adj. sup. noblest, E 72, 131. 

Gentilly, adv. gently, honourably, A 
3104 ; courteously, B 1093 ; frankly, F 
674. 

Gentils, s. pi. gentlefolk, A 31 13. 

Geonaancie, s. divination by figures made 
on the earth, I 605. 

Geometriens, s.pl. geometricians, B 3. 

P 10. 143- 

Gere, s. gear, armour, A 2180; equip- 
ment, A 4016; property, B 800; utensils, 
A 352; apparel, A 365; //. contrivances, 
F 1276. 

Gere, s. changeful manner, A 1372 ; //. 
changeful ways, A 1531. 

Gerfu'l, adj. changeable, T. iv. 286; A 
1538. Cf. Gery. 

Gerland, s. garland, R. 566. 

Gerner, s. garner, A 593. 

Gery, adj. changeable, A 1536. 

Gesse, v. suppose, imagine, R. 1115; \pr. 
s. suppose, A 82, 117 ; B 3435, 3960. 

Gessinge, s. opinion, B i. p 4. 315. 

Gest, s. guest, HF. 288. 

Geste, s. romance, tale, story, T. ii. 83, 
iii. 450; in geste, in romance-form, like 
the common stock-stories, B 2123 ; pi. 
stories, D 642; occurrences, T. i. 145; 
exploits, affairs, T. ii. 1349 ; histories, 
history, B 1126; deeds, HF. 1434. 

Gestours, s. pi. story-tellers, B 2036; 
Gestiours, HF. 1198. 



Get (jet), s. contrivance, G 1277. 

Geten, v. obtain, get, L. 2370; beget, E 
1437 ; Get, pr. s. procures, 1 828 ; Gete, 
■2pr.pl. as fut. (ye) will get, 5. 651; Gat, 
pt. s. begat, B 715 ; got, 7. 206; procured 
for, A 703 ; Geten, pp. gotten, obtained, 
A 291 ; won, L. 1753; begotten, L. 1402; 
han geten hem, to have acquired for 
themselves, F 56. 

Gif, conj. if (Northern), A 4181, 4190. 

Gigges,//. rapid movements, HF. 1942. 

Gigginge, pres. pt. pi. fitting with straps, 
A 2504. From O. F. guigue, a handle of 
a shield. 

Gilden, adj. golden, 3. 338. 

Gilt, s. guilt, offence, F 757, 1039 ; //. sins, 

B 3015- 
Giltelees, adj. guiltless, innocent, A 1312. 
Giltif, adj. guilty, T. iii. 1019. 
Gin, s. contrivance, snare, G 1165; //. 

traps, snares, R, 1620. 
Gingebreed, s. gingerbread, B 2044. 
Ging-ere, s. ginger, R, 1369. 
Ging-len, v. jingle, A 170. 
Ginne, z-. begin, attempt, HF. 2004; Gan, 

I pt. s. began, T. i. 266; {as auxiliary 

verd), did, R. 734, 1129; Gonne,//. did, 

E 1103; HF. 944, 1002; began, C 323; 

Gonnen, //. //. began, 5. 531; Gunne, 

//.//. began, HF. 1658; did, HF. 1384; 

Gunnen, pt.pl. did, T. ii. 150. 
Ginninge, s. beginning, T. i. 377. 
Gipoun, s. a short cassock or doublet, 

A 75, 2120. 
Gipser, s. pouch, purse, A 357. 
Girdel, j-. girdle, A 358,3250; central line, 

or great circle, A. i. 17. 49. 
Girden, ^^r. to strike, B 3736. Properly 

to switch. 
Girdilstede, s. waist, R. 826. 
Girles, //. young people, whether male 

or female, A 664. 
Girt. pr. s. girds, L. 1775 ; pp. girded, A 329. 
Giser, s. gizzard, liver, B 3. m 12. 47. 
Giterne, s. kind of guitar, cittern, A 3333. 
Giterninge, s. playing on the gittern, or 

cittern, A 3363. 
Glade, ger. to gladden, cheer, E 1174; 

ger. to console, A 2837 ; to rejoice, 5. 687 ; 

Gladed, //. s. cheered, T. i. 116; imp. s. 

3/. may he comfort, E 822; Gladeth, 

imp.pl. rejoice, 4. i. 
Glader, s. one that cheers, A 2223. 
Gladly, .3 rf<y. fitly, 887; willingly, F 224; 

by preference, L. 770 ; that been gl. wyse, 

that would be thought wise, F 372. 
Gladsom, adj. pleasant, B 3968. 
Glareth, pr. s. glistens, shines, HF. 272. 



(Sloggarial EntJex. 



49 



Glase, ger. to glaze, furnish with glass, T. 

V. 469. To glaze ones hood = to provide 
with a useless defence. 

Glasing", s. glass-work, 3. 327. 

Glede, s. burning coal, glowing coal or 
ashes, B iii; coloured as the glede, oi 
a bright red, gules, B 3574; pi. glowing 
coals, L. 235. See Gleed. 

Gledy, adj. glowing (as a coal), burning, 
L. 105. 

Glee, s. music, T. ii. 1036; entertainment, 
B 2030; pi. musical instruments, HF. 
1209. 

Gleed, s. glowing coal, L. 735. 

Glente, //.//, glanced, T, iv. 1223. 

Glewe, V. fasten, glue, HF. 1761. 

Gleyre, s. white (of an egg), G 806. 

Gllden, pp. of G\yde. 

Glimsing-, s'. imperfect sight, E 2383. 

Glxteren, pr.pl. glitter, A 977. 

Glood,//. s. f/Glyde. 

Glose, s. glosing, comment, L. 328; F 
166; explanation, D 1792; commentary, 
hence margin, 3. 333. 

Glose, ger. to interpret, explain, T. iv. 
1410; to flatter, B 3330; speak with 
circumlocution, E 2351 ; persuade cun- 
ningly, T. iv. 147 1 ; cajole, D 509; com- 
ment on, B 1180. 

Glosinge, s. explaining, D 1793. 

Glyde, V. glide, A 1575; ascend, G 402; 
slip, T. iv. 1215 ; up gl., rise up gradually, 
F 373 ; Glood, pt. s. went quickly, B 
2094; Gllden,//, glided, passed, E 1887. 

Gniden, //.//. rubbed, 9. 11. From A. S, 
gnidan. 

Gnof, s. churl (lit. thief), A 3188. Mod. 
E. gonoph. 

Gnow, pt. s. gnawed, B 3638. | 

Gobet, s. piece, morsel, fragment, A 696. 1 

God, s. A 769; God be with you, farewell, 
C 748; Goddes, God's, Christ's, B 1166; 1 
{pronounced god's), D 1096; Goddes, 
pi. gods, false gods, 3. 1328. 

Godhede, s. divinity, A 2381. 

Godlihede, s. beauty, T. iii. 1730. 

Godsib, s. sponsor, I 909. 

Gold, s. made of gold, R. 1193. 

Gold-bete, adorned with beaten gold, 
gilt, 7. 24. Cf. Y-bete. 

Goldes,//. marigolds, A 1929. 

Gold-he wen, pp. hewn of gold, cut out 
of or made of gold, A 2500. 

Goldlees, adj. moneyless, B 1480. 

Goldsmithrie, s. goldsmiths' work, A 
2498. 

Golee, s. gabble (lit. mouthful), 5. 566. 
O. F. golee. 



Golet, s. throat, gullet, C 543. 

Goliardeys, s. buffoon, scurrilous talker, 
A 560. 

Gomme, s. gum, L. 121. 

Gon, V. go, proceed, F 200; walk, L. 1399; 
move, A 2510; lete it goon, let it go, G 
1475 ; to walk, I 105 ; move, F921 ; roam, 
L. 2066 ; Goost, 2 pr. s. goest, G 56 ; 
Goth, pr. s. goes, i. 68 ; Gooth about, 
seeks for, T. i. 1091 ; Gooth, goes, B 385 ; 
Geeth, L. 2145; Gas (Northern), A 
4037 ; Goon, pr.pl. proceed, go along, E 
898 ; Goon, pp. gone, L. 792 ; B. 17 ; Go, 
pp. gone, G 907; Geen (Northern), A 
4078; Go, pr. s. subj. may walk, L. 2069; 
Go we, let us go, T. ii. 615 ; Goth, imp. 
pl- go, B 3384. 

Gonfanoun, s. gonfanon, gonfalon, a 
sacred banner, R. 1201. 

Gonge, s. privy, I 885. 

Gonne, s. missile, L. 637; gun, cannon, 
HF. 1643. 

Gonne, -n; see Ginne, v. 

Good, s. property, goods, 5. 462; Gode, 
dat. benefit, HF. i, 58; property, wealth, 
L. 2638 ; Godes,//. goods, B 2605. 

Goodlich, adj. kind, bountiful, G 1053. 

Goodliheed, s. seemliness, T. ii. 842; 
goodly seeming, HF. 330; a goodly out- 
side, HF. 274. 

Goodly, adj. kindly, B 2921; excellent, 
L. 77 ; pleasing, right, B 3969 ; portly, 
B 4010. 

Goodly, adv. patiently, T. iii. 1035 ; well, 
B 2420 ; kindly, HF. 565 ; reasonably, T. 
iii. 990; favourably, T. iii. 654; rightly, 
B 2860. 

Good-man, s. master of the house, C 361 ; 
householder, L. 1391. 

Goos, s. goose, 5. 358 ; Gees, pl. E 2275. 

Goosish, adj. goose-like, foolish, T. iii. 

584- 
Goost, 2pr. s. goest, B. 2501. 

Goot, s. goat, A 688, G 886. 

Gore, s. ' gore ' or gusset of a garment, B 

1979 ; a triangular piece cut out, A 3237. 
Goshauk, s. goshawk, B 1928. 
Gosslb, s. female companion, D 529-,- 

male (spiritual) relation, D 243 ; Godsib,, 

sponsor, I 909. 
Gossomer, s. gossamer, F 259. 
Gost, s. spirit, ghost, HF. 185 ; soul, i. 56 ; 

mind, L. 103; ghost (ironically), H 55; 

the Holy Spirit, i. 93 ; G 328; yeldeth 

up the gost, gives up the ghost, L. 886. 
Gostly, Goostly, adj. spiritual, I 392. 
Gostly, adv. spiritually, mystically, G- 

109 ; devoutly, truly, T. v. 1030. 



^3 



50 



(3lo&mxm\ l^ntizx. 



Goter, s, gutter, channel for water, L. 

2705. 

Goune-clooth, s. cloth to make a gown, 
D 2247, 2252. 

Governaille, s. mastery, E 1192 ; p/. rules, 
B I. p 6. 32. 

Governaunce, s. management, control, 
rule, HF. 945, 958; providence, T. ii. 
467 ; dominion, B 3541 ; manner of 
action, F 311; self-control, T. ii. 1020; 
charge, care, C 73 ; demeanour, T. ii. 
219. 

■Gov6rne, v. control, T. iii. 475 ; imp. pi, 
arrange, regulate, B 1451, E 322. 

Gov6rneresse, s. fern, governor, ruler, 
mistress, i. 141 ; 2. 80. 

Governour, s. ruler, umpire, A 813; 
leader, L. 1060. 

Grace, s. favour, i. 46; mercy, F 999; 
pardon, B 647; good opinion, R. 1169; 
virtue, R. 1099; hir grace, her favour 
(i. e. that of the Virgin), B 980 ; of grace, 
out of favour, in kindness, F 161 ; 
sory grace, an ill favour, HF. 1790; dis-» 
favour, D 746 ; harde grace, displeasure, 
5. 65 ; displeasure, disgust, D 2228 ; 
severity, HF. 1586; disfavour, misfor- 
tune, T. i. 713 ; ill luck (i. e. a curse upon 
him), G 665 ; Graces, jZ)/. thanks, B 2994. 

Gracelees, adj. unfavoured by God, G 
1078 ; out of favour, T. i. 781. 

Grame, s. anger, grief, harm, 7. 276. 

Grange, s. barn, granary, A 3668. 

Grant mercy, best thanks, G 1380. 

Grapenel, s. grapnel, L. 640. 

Gras {\),s. grass, R. 1419. 

Gras (2), s. grace, B 2021. 

Graspe, v. grope, T. v. 223. 

Gras-tynae, s. time of eating grass, time 
of youth, A 3868. 

Graiinges, pi. granges, barns, granaries, 
HF. 698. 

Graunt, s. grant, R. 851. 

Graunt mercy, best thanks, G 1156. 

Graunten, v. grant, R. 1483 ; fix, name, 
E 179 ; pt. s. assented to, L. 2665 ; pt. pi. 
consented to, A 786. 

Grave, s. A 2778 ; pit, L. 680. 

Graven, v. engrave, F 830 ; Grave, v. dig ; 
dol/i she gr., she causes to be dug, L. 678 ; 
bury, E 681 ; to engrave, C 17 ; Graven, 
pp. engraved, graven, HF. 193; buried, 
L. 785; Grave, pp. graven, HF. 157. 

•Grayn, s. dye ; in grayn, in dye, i. e. 
dyed of a fast colour, B 1917. 

■Graythe, ger. to clothe, dress, R. 584. 

Grece, s. grease, A 135. 

Gredy, adj. greedy, ready, T. iii. 1758. 



Gree (i),^, favour, good part, R. 42; good 
will, 18. 73 ; in gree, favourably, T. ii. 529. 
Gree (2), s. degree, rank, L. 1313; supe- 
riority, A 2733. 

Greef, s. grievance, D 2174. 

Greet, adj. great, 3. 954 ; principal, B 1181 ; 
voc. B 1797; pi. L. 929; luxuriant, C 37; 
a greet, a great one, A 339 ; Grete, def. 
adj. as s., the chief part, L. 574. 

Grehound.es, s.pl. greyhounds, A 190. 

Greithe, v. prepare, B 3784. 

Gr6ne, adj. as s., green colour, R. 573 ; A 
103 ; green clothing (the colour of in- 
constancy), 21. 7; green place, green 
space, F 862. 

Grenehede, v. greenness, wantonness, B 
163. 

Gremiing,pres.part. grinning, R. 156. 

Gres, s. grass, T. ii. 515 ; //. grasses, HF. 

1353- 
Grete, v. greet; i?np. s. L. 2299; Grette, 

I pi. s. L. 116. 
Gretter, adj. comp. greater, A 197. 
Grevaunce, s. grievance, trouble, hard- 
ship, B 2676 ; complaint (against us) , 

I. 63 ; discomfort, 5. 205 ; affliction, 10. 

47; pi. distresses, T. i. 647. 
Greve, s. grove, T. v. 1144; //. A 1495; 

boughs, sprays, L. 227. 
Greve, ^^r. to harm, R. 1042; feel vexed, 

grumble, T. i. 343 ; pr. s. grieves, harms, 

A 917 ; impers. it vexes, E 647. 
Grevous, adj. grievous, painful, T. v. 

1604. 
Greyn, s. grain, corn, A 596; grain (dye), 

B 4649 ; in greyn, of a fast colour, F 511 ; 

Greyn de Paradys, grains of paradise, 

R. 1369; Greyn, grain (of paradise), 

cardamom, A 3690. 
Greythen, pr. pi. prepare (themselves), 

get ready, A 4309; ger. to adorn, clothe, 

dress, R. 584. \Q.€i. grei^a. 
Griffon, s. griffin, A 2133. 
Grille, adj.pl. horrible, R. 73. 
Grim, adj. angry, A 2042; fierce, A 2519. 
Grimnesse, s. horror, I 864. 
Grinte, pt. s. grinned, D 2161. 
Grinting-e, s. gnashing (of teeth), I 208. 
Grisel, s. name given to an old man, 

whose hair is gray (lit. old horse), 16. 35. 
Grisly, adj. horrible, terrible, awful, A 

1363, 1971 ; very serious, T. ii. 1700. 
Grobbe, v. dig, grub (up), 9. 29. 
Grome, s. man ; gr. and wenche, man 

and woman, HF. 206; pi. men, R. 200. 
Gronte, pt. s. groaned, B 3899. 
Grope, V. try, test, examine, A 644; ger. 

to search out, D 1817. 



(glossarial Cntjex. 



51 



Grot, s. particle, atom, D 1292. 
Orote, s. groat, (Dutch) coin, C 945. 
Grounded, p/>. well instructed, A 414; 

founded, T. iv. 1672, 
Groyn (i),s. (a swine's) snout, I 156. 
Groyn (2), s. murmur, T. i. 349. 
Groyning", s. murmuring, A 2460. 
Grucche, v. murmur, T. iii. 643; £-er. to 

grumble, D 443. 
Grucching", s. grumbling, complaining, 

murmuring, D 406, I 499. 
Gruf, adv. on their faces, grovellingly, 

in a grovelling posture, A 949, B 1865. 

Cf. Icel. agnifu, face downwards, 
Grypen, ger. to grasp, R. 204. 
Grys, adj. gray, G 559; potnely grys, i.e. 

dapple-gray. 
Grys, s. a gray fur, A 194. The fur of 

the gray squirrel. 
Guerdon, s. recompense, meed, reward, 

R. 1526 ; /lim to g., as a reward for him, 

L. 2052. 
Guerdone, v. reward, I 283 ; pp. B 2462. 
Guerdoning', s. reward, 5. 455. 
Gyde, s. guide, A 804; ruler, G 45; 

guide, wielder, 5. 136. 
Gyde, ger. to direct, lead, T. i. 183; to 

guide, T. iii. 1811 ; pr. pi. conduct, T. 

ii. 1 104. 
Gyderesse, s. conductress, B 4. p i. 9. 
Gydingr, s. guidance, T. v. 643, 
^y©. ^- guide, A 1950, E 1429; conduct 

(myself), L. 2045; govern, A 3046; rule, 

B 3587; instruct, control, B 1286; ger. 

to guide, T. v. 546 ; to regulate, I 13 ; 

as wisly he gye, so verily may he guide, 

25.8. 
Gyle, s. deceit, A 2596; trick, T. iii. 'jj'j. 
Gylour, s. beguiler, trickster, A 4321, 
Gyse, s. guise, way, A 663 ; manner, 

R. 789, A 1208, 1789; custom, A 993; 

way, plan, T. iv. 1370. 
Gyte, s. dress, perhaps skirt or mantle, 

■^ 3954 1 P^- D 559. a.gyde in Jamieson's 

Diet., where the sense is dress, skirt, 

or mantle. Gascoigne uses gife in the 

sense of dress in his Philomena, I. 117: 

'A stately Nimph, a dame of heauenly 

kinde, Whose glittering gite so glimsed 

in mine eyes.' 

H. 

Ha ! ha ! inter; . B 4571. 
Haberdassher, s. seller of hats, A 361. 
Habergeoun, s. a hauberk or coat of 

mail, A 76, 2119. 
Habitacle, s. habitable space, B 2. p 7. 

59; Habitacles,//. niches, HF. 1194. 



HabOTindaunt, pres. pt. abounding, B 

3. p 2. 32. 
Habounde, v. abound, B 3938, E 1286. 
Habundant, adj. abundant, E 59. 
Habundaunce, s. plenty, B 2322. 
Habyten,/;-. pi. inhabit, R. 660. 
Hacches, pi. hatches, L. 648. 
Hailes, />/. hail-storms, HF. 967. 
Hainselins, j-. pi. short jackets, I 422. 

O. F. hainserin, hafncellin, a sort of robe ; 

cf. G. Heuid, shirt. 
Haire, .f. hair-shirt, R. 438. 
Hakeney, s. old horse, R. 1137 ; G 559. 
Halde, /i/. held, esteemed (Northern), A 

4208. 
Hale, V. draw, attract, 5. 151; pr. s. 

draws back, i. 68. 
Half, s. side, HF. 1136; behalf, T. ii. 

1734; Halfe, dat. 5. 125; on tny halfe, 

from me, 3. 139 ; a goddes halfe, on 

God's side, in God's name, D 50; Halve, 

dat. side, part, T. iv. 945 ; pi. sides, 

A 3481. 
Half-g-oddes, pi. demi-gods, L. 387. 
Half-yeer ag-e, of the age of half a year, 

A 3971. 
Haliday, s. holiday, A 3309, 3340. 
Halke, s. corner, R. 464; hiding-place, 

L. 1780; nook, F 1 121 ; pi. G 311. 
Halle, s. hall, A 353 ; dining-room, T. ii. 

1 170 ; parlour, B 4022. 
Halp, pt. s. of Helpe. 
Hals, s. neck, HF. 394 ; B 73 ; cut the hals, 

cut in the throat, L. 292 a. 
Halse, I pr. s. I conjure, B 1835. The 

proper meaning of A. S. healsian is to 

clasp round the neck (A. S. heals), and 

thence to beseech, supplicate. 
Halt. pr. s. of Holde and Halten. 
Halten, ger. to limp, T. iv. 1457; Halt, 

pr. s. goes lame, 3. 622. 
Halve g"oddes, //. demigods, T. iv. 

1545- 
Halvendel, s. the half part (of), T. v. 

335- 

Halwen, ger. to hallow, I 919. 

Halwes, pi. saints, B 1060; apostles, 3. 
831 ; shrines of saints, A 14. 

Haly-dayes, pi. holy-days, festivals, A 
3952, I 667. 

Ham, s. home (Northern), A 4032. 

Hameled, pp. cut off, T. ii. 964. (It 
refers to the mutilation of dogs that 
were found to be pursuing game 
secretly. They were mutilated by 
cutting off a foot.) A. S. hanielian, to 
mutilate. 

Hamer, s. hammer, A 2508. 



52 



(glossarial Unliex. 



Hampred, pp. hampered, burdened, R. 

1493- 

Hand, s. hand, A io8 ; in his hande, 
leading by his hand, L. 213. 

Handebrede, s. hand's breadth, A 381 1. 

Hand"wrerk, s. creatures, things created, 
D 1562. 

Hangeth, pr. s. asfut. will hang, R. 193 ; 
Heeng, />/. J-. hung, A 3250; Heng,//. j-. 
hung, R. 224, 240; (which) hung, E 
1883; hung down, T. ii. 689; Hanged, 
pp. hung round, A 2568 ; hung, T. ii. 353. 

Hap, s. chance, E 2057 ; luck, success, 
B 3928, G 1209; good fortune, 3. 1039; 
h. other grace, a mere chance or a 
special favour, 3. 810; pi. occurrences, 
3. 1279. 

Happe, V. happen, befall, A 585; h. how 
h. may\ happen what may, T. v. 796. 

Happen, pr. s. subj. (it) may happen, L. 
78. 

Happy, adj. lucky, T. ii. 621. 

Hard, adj. hard, A 229; of hard, with 
difficulty, T. ii. 1236; def. cruel, 6. 106; 
F 499 ; with h. grace, with displeasure, 
severity (see Grace). 

Harde, adv. tightly, A 3279. 

Hardely, adv. boldly, R. 270 ; unhesitat- 
ingly, 6. 118; scarcely, R. 4; certainly, 
HF. 359. 

Hardiment, s. boldness, T. iv. 533. 

Hardinesse, s. boldness, A 1948, B 3210; 
fool-hardiness, B 2508 ; insolence, I 438. 

Harding', s. hardening, tempering, F 243. 

Hardn6sse, s. cruelty, 4. 232; hardship, 
I 688. 

Hardy, adj. bold, A 405 ; sturdy, F 19 ; 
rash, R. 1038. 

Harie, ger. to drag, I 171; Haried, //. 
pulled forcibly, A 2726. 

Harlot, s. a person of low birth, servant- 
lad, D 1754; ribald, A 647; rogue, 
rascal, A 4268; Harlotes, pi. thieves, 
pick-pockets, R. 191. (Used of both 
sexes.) 

Harlotry e, s. ribaldry, A 3145 ; wicked- 
ness, D 1328 ; evil conduct, E 2262 ; pi. 
ribald jests, A 561. 

Harm, s. harm, 3. 492; A 385; broken 
harm, occasional injury, petty annoy- 
ance, E 1425. 

Harneised, //. equipped (lit. harnessed), 
A 114. 

Harneys, s. armour, A 1006 ; gear, ar- 
rangement, I 974; fittings, A 2896; 
harness, I 433; provision, D 136. 

Harpe-string-es, pi. harp-strings, HF. 



Harping, s. playing on the harp, A 266. 

Harpour, s. harper, T. ii. 1030. 

Harre, s. hinge, A 550. A. S. heorra. 

Harrow ! ittterj. help ! A 3286. O. F. haro. 

Harwed,//. s. harried, despoiled, A 3512, 
D 2107. (Alluding to the harrying or 
harrowing of hell by Christ.) A. S. 
hergian. 

Hasard, s. dice-play, C 465, 591. 

Hasardour, s. gamester, C 596. 

Hasardrye, s. gaming, playing at hazard, 
C590. 

Hasel-"Wode, s. hazel-wood, i. e. no news 
(see below), T. v. 505, 1174; pi. hazel- 
bushes, T. iii. 890. (Hazel-woods shake, 
i. e. that is no news, it is of no use to 
tell me that.) 

Haspe, s. hasp, A 3470. 

Hast, hast thou (so)? A 4268. 

Hast, s. haste, T. iii. 1438. 

Hasteth, imp. pi. make haste, I 72. 

Hastif , adj. hasty, A 3545. 

Hastifnesse, s. hastiness, B 2312. 

Hastow, "zpr. s. hast thou, A 3533. 

Hateful, adj. hateful, D 366; odious 
(Lat. odibile), D 1 195. 

Hateredes, s. pi. hatreds, B 4. m 4. 2. 

Haubergeons, j^/.hauberks,1 1052, 1054, 

Hauberk, s. coat of mail, A 2431, B 2053. 

Haunche-bon, s. thigh-bone, A 3803; 
pi. haunch-bones, A 3279. 

Haunt, s. abode, B abode, B 2001 ; ' limit,' 
usual resort, A 252 c; use, practice^ 
skill, 447. 

Haunteth, pr. s. habitually uses, T. v, 
1556; is used to, A 4392; practises, C 
547 ; pr. pi. resort to, I 885 ; practise, 
I 780, 847. 

Hauteyn, adj. proud, stately, 5. 262 r 
loud, C 330 ; Hautein, haughty, I 614. 

Haven, v. have, T. iii. 1463 ; Han, v. F 56 ; 
keep, retain, C 725 ; take away, C 727 ; 
obtain, G 234; possess (cf. 'to have and 
to hold'), B 208; Hast, 2 pr. s. hast 
thou so? A 4268 ; Hath, pr. s. has,, 
L. 2700 ; Han, i pr. pi. have, L. 28 ; 
2pr.pl. A 849; H^n, pr.pl. E 188, 381 r 
possess, A. pr. 24 ; Hadde, i pt. s. pos- 
sessed, 2. 34; Hadde, /A J. had, L. 1859;. 
had, possessed, E 438; took, E 303; 
Hade (used for the rime) , //. s. A 554, 
617 ; Hadden, pt. pi. had, Icept, E 201 ; 
Hadde, />/.//. L. 1841 ; I hadde lever, I 
would rather, B 3083; Have, imp. s. 
take, F 759 ; Have doon, make an end, 
5. 492. 

Havinge, s. possession {habendi), B 2. 
m S- 33- 



(ilossarial Untei. 



53 



Hawe, (i), s. haw, yard, enclosure, C 855, 

Ha"we, (2), J. haw (fruit of dog-rose), D 
659 ; wUA hawe bake, witli baked haws, 
i. e. with coarse fare, B 95. 

Hay, s. hedge, R. 54. 

Hayl, interj. hail ! A 3579. 

Hayt, interj. come up 1 D 1543. 

He, pron. he, A 44, &c. ; used for it. G 867, 
868 ; that he, that man, HF. 2069 ; He . . . 
he, this one . . . that one, 5. 166 ; He and 
he, one man and another, T. ii. 1748 ; 
Him, dat. and ace. himself, A 87; Him 
or here, him or her, HF. 1003 ; him 
semed, it seemed to him, he appeared, 
B 3361; Hem, pi. dat. and ace. them, 
A 11; hem seemed, it seemed to them, 
they supposed, F 56. 

Hed, pp. hidden, L. 208. 

Hede, s. heed, A 303; tak y^., take care, 
1.47. 

Hede, v. provide with a head, T. ii. 1042, 

H^6d, s. head, A 198, 293. 455 ; source, 
16. 43; beginning, F 1282; on his h., 
at the risk of his head, A 1725; malgre 
hir hede, in spite of all they can do, 

4. 220 ; maugree hir heed, in spite of all 
she could do, D 887 ; maugre thyn heed, 
in spite of all thou canst do, B 104 ; 
Hedes,//. heads, or first points of signs, 
A. i. 17. 20; Hevedes, heads, B 2032. 

Heef , pt. s. of Heve. 

Heeld, pt. s. of Holde. 

Heelp, pt. s. of Helpe. 

Heeng, pt. s. of Hange. 

H66p, s. heap, i. e. crowd, host, A 575 ; 

great number, crowd, T. iv. 1281. 
H66r, s. hair, R. 549; Heres, pi. HF. 

1390. 
H66r, adv. here, B 1177; Heer and ther, 

never long in one place, G 1174; her 

and ther, hither and thither, B 5. p 

5. 33. 

Heer-ag-ayns, prep, against this, I 668. 
Heer-biforn, adv. here-before, before 

this. F 1535. 
Hear-forth, adv. in this direction, D looi. 
Heer-mele, s. the thickness of a hair, 

a hair's breadth, A. ii. 38. 17. 
Heeste, s. commandment, I 845. 
Heet, //. -f. of Hote. 
Hegge, s. hedge, T. v. 1144; pi. B 4408. 
Heigh, adj. high, A 316, 522; great, A 

1798; lofty, B 3192; learned, E 18; 

severe, B 795 ; Heighe, def C 633 ; in 

h. and lowe, in both high and low 

things, i. e. wholly, A 817, B 993. 
Heighe, adv. high up, T. iv. 996; heigh, 

B 4607 ; an heigh, on high, F 849. 



Heighly, adv. strongly, T. ii. 1733. 

Helde, v. hold, retain, D 272. See Holde 
(the usual form). 

Helde, pt. pi. poured out, HF. 1686. 
(Better than ' held.') See Hielde. 

Hele, .f. health, L. 1159; recovery, well- 
being, I. 80; prosperity, L. 296. A. S. 
ha:lu. 

H61e, dat. heel, T. iv. 728. 

Hele, v. conceal, B 2279; //. hidden, B 
4245. A. S. helan. 

Helelees, adj. out of health, T. v. 1593. 

Helen, v. heal, 11. 4; //. A 2706. 

Helle, s. hell, 4. 120; L. 2, 6. 

Helpe, s. helper, assistant, L. 1616. 

Helpe,t^.help, A 258 ; H. of, cure of, A 632 ; 
Heelp, \ pt. s. helped, A 4246; Heelp, 
//. s. B 920 ; Halp,//. s. A 165 1 ; Helpeth, 
imp. pi. L. 68 ; Holpe,//". s. subj. helped, 
R. 1230; Holpen, pp. helped, aided, 
F 666; healed, A 18. 

Helply, adj. helpful, T. v. 128. 

Hem, them ; see He. 

Hemi-spere, hemisphere, T. iii. 1439. 

Hem-self, pron. pi. themselves, B 145', 
Hem-selven, F 1420. 

Hen, s. hen, A 177 ; (as a thing of small 
value), D 1112. 

Hende, adj. courteous, polite, gentle, 
A 3199. 3272, 3462. 

Henne, adv. hence, T. i. 572. 

Hennes, adv. hence, T. v. 402 ; now, HF. 
1284. 

Hennes-forth, adv. henceforth, R. 701. 

Hente, v. catch, I 355 ; seize, A 3347 ; 
acquire, get, A 299 ; circumvent, T. iv. 
137 1 ; dide her for to hente, caused her 
to be seized, L. 2715 ; Hent,/r. s. seizes, 
catches, T. iv. 5 ; Hente, pr. s. subj. 
may seize, G 7 ; Hente, pt. s. caught, 
took, A 957; caught away, B 1144; 
seized, caught hold of, T. ii. 924 ; grasped, 
C 255; took forcibly, E 534; took in 
hunting, B 3449 ; lifted, G 205 ; pt. pi. 
seized, A 904; caught, R. 773; pp. 
caught, A 1581. 

Henteres, s. pi. filchers, B i. p 3. 89. 

H6pe, s. hip, the fruit of the dog-rose, B 

1937- 
Hepen,/r. pi. augment, B 5. p 2. 46; //. 

accumulated, T. iv. 236. 
Her, Hir, proti, poss. their, B 136. A. S. 

heora, hira, of them ; gen. pi. of he, he. 
Heraud, j-. herald, A 2533. 
Heraude, ger. to proclaim as a herald 

does, HF. 1576. 
Herber, s. garden, T. ii. 1705 ; arbour, L. 

203. 



54 



i3loQmxiai llntiex. 



Herberg'ag'e, s. a lodging, abode, A 4329 ; 
B 4179. 

Herberg-eours, s. pi. harbingers, pro- 
viders of lodgings, B 997. 

Herberwe, or Herber-w, s. harbour, A 
403; inn, A 765; lodging, shelter, A 
41 19; dwelling, position, F 1035. 

Herberwe, ^^r. to shelter, R. 491; Her- 
berweden, //.//. lodged, B 2. p 6. 75. 

Herberwing-, s. lodging, sheltering, A 

4332. 
Her-biforn, adj. before this time, L. 73; 

a while ago, 3. 1136. 
Her-by, adv. with respect to this matter, 

D 2204; hence, HF. 263. 
Herde, s. shepherd, G 192 ; keeper of 

cattle, A 603. 
Herde-g-romes,//. herdsmen, HF. 1225. 
Herdes, pi. coarse flax, ' hards,' R. 1233. 
Herdesse, s. shepherdess, T. i. 653. 
Herajpron. her, R. 1260; &c. 
'B.GVe,poss.pron. her, T. i. 285; &c. 
Here, adv. here, in this place, on this 

spot.T. V. 478. (Dissyllabic.) See Heer. 
Here, v. hear, A 169; Heren, v. HF. 879; 

Herestow, 2/r. s. hearest thou, A 3366; 

Herth, pr. s. hears, L. 327 a ; Herde, 

pt. s. heard, A 221 ; Herdestow, heardest 

thou, A 4170; Herd,//, heard, 3. 129, 
Here-agayns, against this, A 3039 ; Here- 

ayeins, in reply to that, T. ii. 1380. 
Here and howne, T. iv. 210; perhaps 

gentle and savage, i. e. one and all 

(doubtful). Cf. here, gentle, in Strat- 

mann ; and A. S. Huna, a Hun. 
Herie, v. praise, T. iii. 1672; Heriest, 

2 pr. s. worshippest, B 3419; pr. s. B 

1 155; P^- P^- worshipped, L. 786; //. B 

872. A. S. herian. 
Herke, /w/.j-. hearken, E 1323; Herketh, 

imp. pl.t) 1656. 
Herknen, v. hearken, listen, I 81 ; ger. 

to listen to, 3. 752; Herkne, v. G 1006; 

ger. B 3159; pt. s. listened to, A 4173; 

Herkned, //. listened, R. 630; h. after, 

expected, F 403. 
Herne, s. corner, F 1121 ; //. G 658. 
Herneys, s. armour, A 2496; //.sets of 

armour, A 1630. 
Heroner, s. falcon for herons, T. iv. 413. 
Heronere. adj. used for flying at herons, 

L. 1 1 20. Said of a falcon. 
Heronsewes, s. pi. hernshaws, young 

herons, F 68. Heronsew is derived, 

regularly, from A. F. herouncel, later 

herounceau ; a diminutive from heroun, 

like lioncel from lion. 
Herse, s. hearse, 2. 15, 36. 



Hert, s. hart, 3. 351 ; 5. 195. 

Herte, s. heart, A 150, 229 ; dear one, T. ii. 

1096; courage, 3. 1222; Hertes, gen. 

heart's, i. 164; WnxX^t, gen. T. ii. 445; 

Herte rote, root (bottom) of the heart, 

R. 1026 ; tnyn hertes, of my heart, 4. 57. 
Herte, //. s. hurt, 3. 883, 
Herte-blood, heart's blood. A 2006, C 902. 
Hertelees, adj. heartless, without heart, 

T. V. 1594; deficient in courage, B 4098. 
Hertely, adv. heartily, A 762 ; thoroughly, 

L. 33; earnestly, 3. 1226; truly, 3. 85. 
Herte-rote, s. root of the heart, depth of 

the heart, L. 1993. 
Herte-spoon, s. ' the concave part of the 

breast, where the ribs unite to form 

the cartilago ensi/ormis' (Tyrwhitt), A 

2606. 
Hert-hunting, s. hunting of the hart, 3. 

1313- 
Herth, /r. s. heareth, L. 327 a. 
Hertly, adj. heartfelt, honest, L. 2124 ; 

hearty, E 176, 502, F 5. 
Heryinge, s. praising, I 682; praise, B 

1649 ; glory, T. iii. 48. 
Heste, s. command, commandment, be- 
hest, B 382; promise, F 1064; Heeste, 

commandment, I 845. 
H6te, s. heat, R. 1508; passion, 4. 127; 

heat, but put for surge, B i. m 7. 4. 
Hete, V. promise, vow, 6. 77 ; pr. s. subj, 

promise, A 2398 ; i pr. s. B 334 ; Hette, 

//. s. 4, 185. See Hote. 
Heterly, adv. fiercely, L. 638. 
Hethen, adv. hence (Northern), A 4033. 
Hethenesse, s. heathen lands, A 49, B 

1112. 
Hething', s. contempt, A 4110. IceU 

heeding. 
Hette,//. s. heated, inflamed, 5. 145. 
Hette, pt. s. promised, 4. 185. See Hote. 
Heve, V. heave, lift, A 550 ; ger. to use 

exertion, labour, T. ii. 1289; pr. s. lifts 

up, B 5. m 5. 18; Haf, /i". s. heaved, A 

3470; Heef, //. s. lifted, B i. p i. 19. 
Heved, s. head, HF. 550; beginning, A. 

ii. 16. 3; Hevedes,//. B 2032. 
Heven, s. heaven, A 519; the celestial 

sphere, B 3300 ; supreme delight, F 558 ; 

beautiful sight, T. ii. 637; Hevene, ^^/z. 

heaven's, D 1181, G 542. 
Hevenish, adj. heavenly, HF. 1395; of 

the spheres, 4. 30. 
Hevieth./r.//. weigh down,^B 5. m 5. 16. 
Hevy, adj. heavy, R. 229; sad, 4. 12. 
Hewe, (i), s. hue, colour, complexion, 

A 394, 1364 ; outward appearance, mien, 

D 1622 ; pretence, C 421. 



(Jllossatial Sutjci. 



55 



He we, (2), J, (household) -servant, domes- 
tic, E 1785. A. S. fiiwa. 

Hewed, adj. coloured, R. 213. 

Hey, s. hay, A 3262 ; grass, B 3407. 

Hey ! interj. hey ! L. 1213. 

Heye, adj. def. high, A. i. 16. 11. 

Heyghte, s. height. A. ii. 22. 8, 

Heyne, s. wretch, G 1319. 

Heynous, adj. heinous, odious, T. ii. 1617. 

Heyre, adj. hair, made of hair, C 736. 

Hey re, s. hair-shirt, G 133. 

Heysug-ge, s. hedge-sparrow, 5. 612. 

Heyt, interj. come up, D 1561. 

Hider, adv. hither, 4. 165. 

Hidous, adj. hideous, A 3520; terrible, 
horrible, dreadful, A 1978, B 4583 ; ugly, 
R. 158. 

Hidously, adv. terribly, A 1701. 

Hielde, pr. s. subj. pour out, shed, B 2. 
m 2. 2 {L&X. fundat). 

Hierdes, female guardian, protectress, 
T. iii. 619, See Herdesse. 

Hig-ht, Hig-hte ; see Hote. 

Highteth, pr. s. adorns, gladdens, B i. 
m 2. 25. 

Hild, pt. s, bent, inclined, 3. 393. 

Hinde, s. hind, 3. 427, 

Hindre, v. hinder, R, 1039. 

Hindreste, super I. hindmost, A 622. 

Hipes, pi. hips, A 472. 

Hir, (i), pers. pron. dat. and ace, to her, 
her, A 126, B 162, &c, 

Hir, {2),poss. pron. her, A 120, B 164, &c. 

Hir, (3), gen. pi. of them; Hir aller, of 
them all, A 586; Hir bothe, of both of 
them, B 221. 

Hir, (4) , poss. pron. their, A 11, B 140, &c. ; 
Her, B 3536, &c. 

Hir thankes, with their good will, will- 
ingly, A 2114. 

Hires, hers, 5. 482, 588. 

Hirnia, s. hernia, I 423. 

His, gen. masc. his, A 47, 50, &c. ; neut. 
its, I. 178; T. iii. 1088, V. 1379; in phr. 
Mars his = of Mars, L. 2593. 

His thankes, with his good will, will- 
ingly, A 2107. 

Historial, adj. historical, C 156. 

Hit, pron. it, 2. 117 ; Hit am I, it is I, 3. 186, 
L. 314; Hit weren, they were, HF. 1323. 

Hit, pr. s. hides, F 512. Hit is a con- 
tracted form, equivalent to hidet/i. 

Ho, interj. hold ! stop ! B 3957. 

Ho, s. exclamation commanding silence, 
A 2533 ; stop, cessation, T. ii. 1083. 

Hochepot, s. hotch-potch, mixture, B 
2447. 

Hoke, dat. (j/Hook. 



Hoker, s. scorn, frowardness, A 3965. 
A. S. hocor. 

Hokerly, adv. scornfully, I 584. 

Hold, s. possession, B 4064 ; grasp, F 167 ; 
keeping, D 599 ; fort, castle, B 507. 

Holde, V. keep, preserve, D 1144; hold, 
keep, B 41 ; continue, go on with, T. ii. 
965; restrain, 7. 309, 310; keep to (see 
Proces), F 658 ; Holden, v. hold, keep, 
F 763; keep, F 1163; think, consider, 
L. 857 ; do than holde herto, keep to it 
then, 3. 754; Holde up, hold up, 2. 24; 
Holde his pees, hold his peace, B 4625 ; 
Holde, I //■. s. consider, deem, G 739; 
Holdest, 2 pr. s. accountest, L. 326; 
Halt, pr. s. holds, 11. 16; T. v. 348; 
keeps, T. ii. 37 ; holds fast, T. iii. 1636 ; 
considers, G 921 ; esteems, D 1185 ; per- 
forms, 3. 621 ; remains firm, 10. 38 ; 
Holt,//-, s. holds, T. iii. 1374; Holden, 
2 pr. pi. keep, L. 2500 ; Holde, 2 pr. pi.. 
esteem, deem, T. v. 1339; Heeld, i pt. s. 
considered, E 818; Heeld, /^. j. held, A 
175 ; took part, A 3847 ; esteemed, C 625 ; 
ruled, B 3518; Holden, pp. esteemed, 
held, A 141 ; considered, E205 ; observed, 
F 1587 ; esteemed, L. 1709 ; bound, T. ii. 
241 ; made to be, C 958 ; Holde, pp. 
esteemed, A 1307 ; bet for the have holde, 
better for thee to have held, 5. 572; 
Hold up, imp. pi. hold up, A 783; 
Holdeth, imp. pi. keep, B 37; consider, 
A 1868. 

Holdinge in hondes, cajolery, HF. 
692. 

Holly, adv. wholly, T. iii. 145. 

Holm, s. evergreen oak, A 2921. 

Holour, s. lecher, adulterer, D 254. 

Holpe, -n; see Helpe. 

Holsom, adj. wholesome, T. i. 947; heal- 
ing, 5. 206. 

Holt, s. plantation, A 6. 

Holt, pr. s. holds, T. iii. 1374. 

Holwe, adj. hollow, G 1265. 

Holwe, adv. hollow, A 289. 

Horn, adv. homewards, F 635. 

Homicyde (i), -y. man-slayer, E 1994. 

Homicyde (2), manslaughter, murder,. 
C 644. 

Hond, s. hand, A 193, 399; Beren him on 
h,, make him believe, T. iv. 1404; Bere 
on h., accuse (of), D 226; Bar on h., 
made (them) believe, D 380; Bar him 
on h., assured him, T. iii. 1154; Holden 
in h., retain, cajole, T. ii. 477; Holde 
in h., T. iii. 773 ; delude with false hopes,. 
3. 1019. 

Honest, adj. creditable, A 246; honour- 



S6 



(©lossarial Entiex. 



able, worthy, B 1751 ; seemly, decent, 
C 328 ; luxurious, E 2028. 

Honestee, s. honour, L. 1673 ; goodness, 
B 3157 ; honourableness, 2. 40 ; womanly 
virtue, C yy. 

Honestetee, s. honour, E 422 ; modesty, 
I 429; neatness, I 431. 

Honestly, adv. honourably, B 1434; 
richly, E 2026. 

Honge, V. hang, A 2410 ; be hung, C 790 ; 
do me h., cause me to be hanged, T. i. 
833; 2. pr.pl. subj. hesitate, T. ii. 1242, 

Hony, s. honey, A 2908 ; beloved one, 
A 3617. 

Hony-conab, a term of endearment, 
sweet one, A 3698. 

Hony-swete, sweet as honey, E 1396. 

Hoodless, adj. without a hood, 3. 1028. 

H66k, s. hook, T. v. 'j']'] ; sickle, B 3. m i. 
3 ; crosier, D 1317. 

Hbol, adj. whole, T. i, 961 ; sound, D 
1370; unwounded, F iiii; perfect, G 
III, 117; restored to health, L. 2468; 
entire, 3. 554. 

Hobl, adj. as adv. wholly, T. i. 1053 ; al 
hool, entirely, T. iii. 1013. 

Hoolly, adv. wholly, R. 1163. 

Hoolnesse, s. integrity, B 4. p 6. 202. 

Hoolsome, adj. wholesome, B 2285. 

Hoolsomnesse, s. health, B 2303. 

H66ni, s. as adv. home, homewards, L. 
1619. 

Hoomlinesse, s. domesticity, E 429; 
familiarity, B 2876. 

Hoonaly, adj. belonging to one's house- 
hold, E 1785. 

Hoomward, adv. homeward, T. iii. 621 ; 
Homward, A 2956. 

Hoor, adj. hoary, white-haired, grey- 
headed, A 3878. 

Hoors, adj. ; see Hors. 

Hoost, s. army, A 874. 

H66t, adj. hot, L. 914; fervent, I 117; as 
s. 5. 380; Hote, def. hot, 5. 266; vora- 
cious, 5. 362 ; (as epithet of Aries, which 
induced heat of blood), F 51. 

Hope, s. expectation, G 870. 

Hope, \ pr. s. fear, A 4029. 

Hoper, s. hopper, A 4036, 4039. 

Hoppe, V. dance, A 4375. 

Hoppesteres, pi. dancers; used as adj., 
dancing, A 2017. 

Hord, s. hoard, treasure, C 775 ; store (of 
apples), A 3262; treasure-house, I 821; 
avarice, 13. 3, 

Hore, pi. o/Hoor, adj. 

Horn, s. horn, T. ii. 642; (musical instru- 
ment, used metaphorically), H 90; pi. 



drinking-horns, A 2279; horns (of the 

moon), T. v. 652. 
Horoscopo ; in horoscopo, within that part 

of the sky considered as the ascendent, 

A. ii. 4. 14. 
Horowe, adj. pi. foul, scandalous, 4. 206. 

Cf. A. S./4or4^ filthy. 
Hors, s. hors, A 168 ; the ' horse," a name 

for the little wedge that passes through 

a hole in the end of the 'pyn,' A. i. 14. 

7 (Arabic alpheraz,\h& horse) ; Hors,//. 

A 74. 598. 

Hors, adj. hoarse, 3. 347 ; Hoors, T. iv. 
1 147. A. S. has. 

Horsly, adj. like all that a horse should 
be, F 194. 

Hose, s. hose, covering for the feet and 
legs, A 3933, G 726; Hosen, //. A 456; 
Hoses,//. A 3319. 

Hospitallers, s. pi. knights hospitallers, 
I 891. 

Hoste, s. host (of an inn), keeper of a 
j lodging, A 747. Often spelt oste. 
i Hostel, s. hostelry, HF. 1022. 
I Hostelrye, s. hostel, inn, A 23. 
j Hostiler, s. innkeeper, A 241 ; pi. ser- 
vants at an inn, I 440. 
i Hote, adj.; see Hoot. 

Hote, adv. hotly, A 97, 1737. 

Hote, V. command, promise; also, be 
called, R. 38 ; Hoten, v. be called, D 144 ; 
Hote, I pr. s. command, HF. 1719; 
Hight, //. s. as pr. s. is called, L. 417 ; 
Highten, //. pi. as pr. pi. are called, L. 
423 ; Hight, pt. s. was named, L. 725 ; 
Highte, pt. s. was called, was named, 
R. 588, 745; I pt. s, was called, A 4336; 
I pt. s. promised, 17. 5; Highte, pt. s. 
promised, T. v. 1636; 2 pt.pl. promised, 
E 496; Hatte, //. s. as pr. s. is called, is 
named, T. iii. 797 ; Hatte, //. pi. were 
called, were named, HF. 1303; Hette, 
I pt. s. promised, 4. 185 ; Heet, pt. s. was 
named, HF. 1604; (who) was called, F 
1388; Hete {/or Heet), 3. 200; Hoten, 
pp. called, A 3941; Hight,//. promised, 
T. ii. 492 ; named, HF. 226. A. S. hatan. 
The parts of the verb show great con- 
fusion. 

Hottes, //. baskets carried on the back, 
HF. 1940. O. F. hotte. 

Hound, s. dog, T. iii. 764. 

Houndflsh, s. dogfish, E 1825. 

Houped, //.//. whooped, B 4590. 

Hous, s. house, A 252, 343; to hoiis, to 
a reception by, L. 1546 ; Hous and hoom, 
house and home, H 229; Hous by hous, 
to each house in order, D 1765 ; a house- 



(^lossarial Entifx. 



57 



hold, F 24 ; a ' mansion ' of a planet (in 
astrology) , F 672 ; a ' house ' or portion 
of the sky (in astrology), B 304. The 
whole celestial sphere was divided into 
twelve equal portions, called houses, by 
six great circles passing through the 
north and south points of the horizon ; 
two of these circles being the meridian 
and the horizon. A house, when used 
for a ' mansion,' is a sign of the zodiac; 
thus Aries was the mansion of Mars. 

H6usbonde, s. husband, B 2241. 

Housbondrye, s. economy, A 4077 ; 
household goods, D 288. 

Housled, pp. made a recipient of holy 
communion, I 1027. 

Hove, V. hover, dwell, T. iii. 1427 ; pr.pl. 
wait in readiness, hover, L. 1196; pt. s. 
waited about, T. v. 33. 

HO"W, ititerj. ho ! A 3437, 3577. 

Ho wne, savage (?) , T, iv. 210. See Here. 

Howve, s. hood, T. iii. 775 ; Sette his 
howve, set (awry) his hood, make game 
of him, A 3911. 

Humanitee, s. kindness, E 92, 

Humbely, adv. humbly, T. v. 1354. 

Humblely , a^i^.humbly, T. ii. 1719 ; L. 156. 

Humblesse, s. meekness, A 1781, B 165. 

Humbling", s. low growl (lit. humming), 
HF. 1039. 

Humme, ger. to hum, T. ii. 1199. 

Hunte, s. huntsman, A 2018, 2628. 

Hunter, s. huntsman, A 1638. 

Hunteresse, s. fern, female hunter, A 

2347- 
Hurlest, 2 pr. s. dost hurl, dost whirl 

round, B 297. 
Hurt, pr. s. hurteth, hurts, T. v. 350. 
Hurtleth, pr. s. pushes, A 2616 ; pr. pi. 

dash together, L. 638. 
Husht, />/. hushed, silent, L. 2682; Hust, 

as imp. s. be silent, A 3722. 
Hy, adj. high, A 306 ; Hye, dat. HF. 1133 ; 

great, E 135 ; Hye weye, dat. (the) high 

way, main road, A 897. 
Hyde, v. hide, A 1477, 1481 ; lie concealed, 

F 141 ; Hydestow, hidest thou, D 308 ; 

Hit,/;-. J. hides, F 512; Hidde, i pt. s. 

hid, F 595 ; Hed, pp. hidden, L. 208 ; 

Hid,//, hidden, R. 1598. 
Hye, a^z^. high, aloft, HF. 905; L. 1200; 

loudly, 3. 305 ; proudly, T. ii, 401. 
Hye, V. hasten, hie, A 2274, G 1151 ; //. me, 

make haste, G 1084 ; ger. to bring 

hastily, F 291; to hasten, HF. 1658; Hy 

thee, imp. s. refi. G. 1295. 
Hye, s. haste ; only in phr. in hye, in 

haste, T. ii. 88, 1712. 



Hyene, s. hyaena, 10. 35. 

Hyer, adj. higher, upper, HF. 11 17. 

Hyne, s. hind, servant, peasant, A 603, 
C 688. A. S. h'lna. 

Hyre, s. hire, A 507 ; reward, i. 103 ; pay- 
ment, D 1008; ransom, T. iv. 506. 



I-, common prefix of past pa?-ticiples ; see 

Y-. 
Icclied, pp. itched, A 3682. 
Ich,//w/. I, T. i. 678, iii. 1818. 
I-comen, pp. come, T. iii. 1668. 
Idus, s.pl. ides, F 47. 
Igiiotum, s. an unknown thing, G 1457. 

Lat. ignotum, an unknown thing; comp. 

ignotius, a less known thing. 
I-graunted, pp. granted, T. iv. 665. 
I-halowed, //. view-hallooed (of the 

hart), 3. 379. 
Ik, I, A 3867, 3888. 

II, adj. evil, A 4174. (A Northern word.) 
Il-hayl, bad luck (to you), A 4089. (A 

Northern form.) 
like, adj. same, very, A 64, 175 ; that 

like, that same, B 3663 ; ilkc saiue, very 

same, L. 779. 
Imaginatyf, adj.; No-thing list him to 

been imaginatyf = it did not at all 

please him to imagine, he did not care 

to think, F 1094. 
Imagining', s. plotting, A 1995 ; fancv, 

18. 36. 
Imperie, s. government, rank, B 2. p 6. 13. 
Impertinent, adj. irrelevant, E 54. 
Impes, pi. grafts, scions, B 3146. A. S. 

ir,ip. 
Impetren, pr. pi. impetrate, ask for, B 5. 

P 3- 225. 
Importable, adj. insufferable, B 3792, E 

1 144. 
Impossible, adj. impossible, T. i. 783; 

as s., thing impossible, D 688. 
Impressen, v. imprint, T. iii. 1543 ; im- 
print (themselves), find an impression, 

E 1578 ; pr. pi. make an impression 

(upon), G 1071. 
Impressioun, s. remembrance, F 371 ; //. 

notions, HF. 39. 
In, s. dwelling, house, A 3547, 3622; inn, 

B 4216 ; lodging, B 1097. 
In, prep, in, A 3, &c. ; into, B 119; = come 

within, 20. 6; on, I 105; against, I 695. 
/;; nianus tuas, into Thy hands (I commend 

my spirit), A 4287. 
In principio, in the beginning, A 254, B 

4353. Part of St. John, i, i. 



C4 



58 



(^lossarial Entifx. 



Inde, adj. indigo, dark blue, R. 67. 
Indeterminat, adj. not marked upon the 

Astrolabe, A. ii. 17. rubric. 
Indifferently, adv. impartially, B 5. p 3. 

142. 
Induracioun, s. hardening, G 855. 
Inequal, adj. unequal, A 2271 ; Inequales, 

//. of varying length ; hoiires inequales, 

hours formed by dividing the duration 

of daylight by twelve, A. ii. 8. i. 
Infect, adj. of no effect, A 320; dimmed, 

B 4. m 5. 12. 
In-fere, adv. together, B 328, D 924. Orig. 

in fere, in company. 
Infoi'tunat, adj. unfortunate, unlucky, 

inauspicious, B 302. 
Infortiine, s. misfortune, ill fortune, T. 

iii. 1626, iv. 185. 
Infortiined, pp. ill-starred, T. iv. 744. 
Infortuning, s. unlucky condition, A. ii. 

4-43- 
Ingot, s. a mould for pouring metal into, 

G 1206, 1209. 
Inhelde, inip. s. pour in, infuse, T. iii. 44. 
Injure, s. injury, T. iii. 1018. 
In-knette, pt. s. knit up, drew in, T. iii. 

1088. 
Inly, adv. inwardly, intimately, ex- 
tremely, greatly, T. i. 140; exquisitely, 

3. 276. 
In-mid, prep, amid, HF. 923. 
Inmortal, adj. immortal, T. i. 103. 
Inne, dat. c/In, s. 
Inne, adv. in, within, T. i. 387, 821. 
Inned, pp. housed, lodged, A 2192. 
Inobedience, s. disobedience, I 391. 
Inobedient, adj. disobedient, I 392. 
Inordinate, adj. unusual, I 414. 
Inpacience, s. impatience, B 2734. 
Inpacient, adj. impatient, B 2730. 
Inparflt, adj. imperfect, B 3. p 10. 18. 
Inplitable, adj. intricate, impracticable, 

B I. p 4. 90. 
Inpossible, s. impossible thing, F 1009. 
Inset, pp. implanted, B 2. p 3. 19. 
Inspired, />/>. quickened, A 6. 
Instable, adj. unstable, E 2057. 
Instance, s. suggestion, T. ii. 1441 ; urgent 

request, E 1611. 
Intendestow, dost thou intend, T. v. 478. 
Intervalle, s. interval, B 2724. 
In-til, prep, unto, as far as, R. 624. 
Into, prep, unto, B 2423. 
Intresse, s. interest, 10. 71. 
In-with, prep, within, in, B 1794, 2159, 

E 870, 1394, 1586, 1944. 
Ipocras, a kind of cordial drink, E 1807. 

Named after Hippocrates. 



Ipocrite, s. hypocrite, R. 414. 

Ire, s. irritability, R. 314; quickness of 

temper, I 665 ; anger, A 1997. 
Irons, adj. angry, B 2315, D 2014. 
Irreg-uler, adj. asinner against his orders, 

I 782. 
Is, I pr. s. am (Northern), A 4031, 4045, 

4202; 2/r. s. art (Northern), A 4089. 
Issest, ■zpr. s. issuest, B 3. p 12. 168. 
Issue, s. outlet, vent, T. v. 205. 
It am I, it is I, A 1736. 
I-"wis, adv. certainly, truly, verily, 6. 48. 

J. 

Jade, s. a jade, i. e. miserable hack, B 4002. 
Jag-ounces, />/. garnets (orrubies) , R. 1 117. 
Jalous, adj. jealous, A 1329. 
Jalousye, s. jealousy, A 3294. 
Jambeux, s. pi. leggings, leg-armour, B 
. 2065. From Y. jam be, the leg. 
Jane, s. a small coin of Genoa, B 1925, 

E999. 
Jangle, v. chatter, prate, T. ii. 666. 
Janglere, s. story-teller, jester, babbler, 

A 560; talkative person, H 343. 
Jangleresse, s. (female) chatterbox, 

prattler, D 638. 
Janglerye, s. gossip, T. v. 755 ; talkative- 
ness, B 2252. 
Jangles, s. pi. idle pratings, HF. i960; 

disputes, arguments, D 1407. 
Janglinge, j-. chattering, idle talking, 

I 649. 
Jape, s. jest, trick, A 3390, 3799, 4201 ; jest, 

foolish conduct, D 1961 ; laughing-stock, 

HF. 414. 
Jape, V. jest, T. i. 929; ger. to jest, L. 

1699; H 4; Japedest, o.pt. s. didst jest, 

T. i. 508, 924; //. tricked, A 1729. 
Japere, s. jester, T. ii. 340; mocker, I 89. 
Japerie, s. buffoonery, I 651 ; jesting 

mood, E 1656. 
Jape-worthy, adj. ridiculous, B 5. p 3. 

148. 
Jargon, s. talk, E 1848. 
Jargoning, s. jargoning, chattering, R. 

716. 
Jaunyce, s. jaundice, R. 305. 
Jeet, s. jet, B 4051. 

Jelous, adj. jealous, suspicious, 4. 140. 
Jet. s. fasliion, mode, A 682. 
Jeupardyes, s. pi. problems (at chess") , 

3. 666. 
Jewerye, s. Jewry, Jews' quarter, B 1679. 
Jo, V. take effect, come about, T. iii. 33. 

O. Y.joer {Y.jouer). 
Jogelour. s. juggler, D 1467 ; //. R. 764. 



(glossarial 3IntJex. 



59 



Jogelrye, s. jugglery, F 1265. 

Jolif, adj. joyful, merry, R. 109, A 3355 ; 

in good spirits, B 4264; jovial, R. 435; 

frisky, A 4154; pretty, R. 610. 
Jolily, adv. merrily, A 4370. 
Jolitee, s. sport, amusement, merriment, 

A 1807; joviality, jollity, mirth, R. 616; 

enjoyment, F 344; comfort, A 680; 

excellence, H 197; happiness, HF. 682. 
Joly, adj. full of merriment, D 456; 

jolly, joyous, R. 620; delightful, L. 176; 

festive, B 11S5. See Jolif. _ 
Jolyer, adj. comp. handsomer, F 927. 
Jolyf ; see Jolif. 
Jolynesse, s. festivity, F 289 ; amusement, 

D 926. 
Jolytee ; see Jolitee. 
Jompre, i7np. s. jumble, T. ii. 1037. 
Jordanes, pi. chamberpots, C 305. 
Jossa, down here, A 4101. O. F. Jos, 

down ; ca, here. 
Jouken, v. slumber, T. v. 409. O. F. 

Joquier,Jouquier, etre en repos, jucher. 
Journee, s. day's work, R. 579; day's 

march, A 2738 ; journey, E 783. 
Jowes, s. pi. jaws, B i. p 4. 107 (where 

the Latin text has faiiclbus) ; jaws, 

jowls, HF. 1786 (riming with clowes, 

claws) . 
Joynture, s. union, B 2. p 5. 51. 
Jubbe, s. vessel for holding ale or wine, 

A 3628, B 1260. (It held 4 gallons.) 
Judicial, adj. judicial, A. ii. 4. 59. 

yudicial astrology pretended to forecast 

the destinies of men and nations ; 

natural astrology foretold natural events, 

such as the weather and seasons. 
Juge, s. judge, A 814; umpire, A 1712, 

1864. 
Jug'e, s. judge ; but an error for Jug, 

a yoke, I 898. Belial is explained to 

mean ' absque iugo,' in the Vulgate. 
Juge, I pr. s. judge, decide, 5. 629; pp. 

HF.357. 
Jugement, s. judgement, decision, A 

778; opinion, B 1038; sentence, 5. 431. 
Juggen, V. judge, T. ii. 21 ; deem, T. 

v. 1203; imp.pl. judge ye, T. iii. 1312. 
Juparte, 2 pr. pi. jeopard, imperil, en- 
danger, T. iv. 1566. 
Jupartye, s. jeopardy, peril, hasard, T. 

ii. 465, 772. O. F. Jeu parti (Lat, tocus 
partitas^, a divided game. 
Just, adj. just, exact, correct, D 2090, 
Juste, V. joust, tourney, tilt, A 96, 2604, 
Justes, .r. pi. as sing, a jousting-match, 

A 2720. 
Justing-, J. jousting, L. 1115. 



Justyse, s. judge, B 665, C 289. 

Justyse, .f. judgement, condemnation, r. 
142; administration of justice, C 587. 

Juyse, s. justice, judgement, B 795 ; sen- 
tence, A 1739. O.F. Juise. 



K. 



Kalender, s. calendar, almanack, A. i. 

II. I ; hence, a complete record of exam- 
ples, L. 542; pi. I. 73. 
Kalendes, i. e. beginning, introduction, 

T. V. 1634. (Because the Kalends fall 

on theyfrj/ of the month.) 
Karf, pt. s. ^/Kerve. 
Kaynard, 's. dotard, D 235. O. F. caig- 

nard, cagnard, sluggard. 
Keccbe, v. catch, clutch, T. iii. 1375. 
Kecbil, s. small cake, D 1747. O. E. 

coecil, small cake. 
Keep, s. care, heed, notice (only in the 

phrase take keep^ ; tak keep, take notice, 

D431. 
Keep, imp. s. take care 1 mind ! A 4101. 
Kek ! interj. (represents the cackle of a 

goose) , 5. 499. 
Kenabe, ger. to comb, R. 599; pr. s. E 

2011; Kembde, pt. s. F 560; Kempte, 

pt. s. A 3374; Kembd, pp. combed, 

trimmed, A 2143. 
Kempe, adj. pi. sliaggy, rough, A 2134. 

Cf. I eel. kampr, beard, moustaches, 

whiskers of a cat; and see Camp, s. (4) 

in the New E. Diet. 
Ken, s. kin, kindred, men, 3. 438. (A 

Kentish form.) 
Kene. adj. keen, eager, 21. 6; cruel, 10.. 

27; bold, B 3439; sharp, A 2876. 
Kene, adv. keenly, 6. 63; 11. 3. 
Kenne, v. discern, HF. 498. 
Kepe, V. take care (of), A 130; keep, 

preserve, L. 384; i pr. s. care, L. 1032; 

intend, T. i. 676 ; regard, reck, A 2238 ; 

/ kepe han, I care to have, G 1368 ; pr. 

s. subj. may (He) keep, F 889; pt. s. 

E 223 ; retained, A 442 ; took care of, 

A 415, 512, B 269; imp. s. take care 1 

A 4101 ; imp.pl. keep ye, B 764. 
Kepe, s. heed (only in the phrase take 

kepe or take keep); I take kepe, 3. 6. 
Keper, s. keeper, i. e. prior, A 172. 
Kerchief, finely woven loose covering, 5. 

272 ; kerchief, B 837. 
Kers, J. cress ; thing of small value, A 

3756. 
Kerve, v. carve, cut, T. ii. 325, F 158; 

Karf, pt. s. carved, A 100; cut, B 3647, 



6o 



(^lossarial EntJct. 



3791; Corven, //. cut, A 2696; carved, 
HF. 1295; slashed, A 3318. 

Kerver, s. carver, A 1899. 

Kerving-, s. carving, A 1925; cutting, 
crossing over, A i. 19. 4. 

Kerving-toles, s. pi. tools to cut with, 
T. i. 632. 

Kesse, v. kiss, E 1057 ; Keste, pt. s. F 350. 
(A Kentish form.) See Kissen. 

Kevere, v. to recover, T. i. 917 ; pp. 
covered, HF. 275, 352. 

Keye, s.G 1219; key (^in place c'/rudder), 
B 3. p 12. 80. Chaucer has translated 
clano (rudder), as if it were claue (key). 

Kichenes,//. kitchens. D 869. 

Kid, Kidde ; see Kythen. 

Kike, V. kick, D 941. 

Kimelin, s. a large shallow tub, A 3548, 
3621. 

Kin, s. kindred, R. 268 ; sotn kin, of some 
kind, B 1137 ; alles kinnes, of every kind, 
HF. 1530. 

Kinde, -f. nature, R. 412, 1699; race, 
lineage, stock, D iioi; seed, I 965; the 
natural world, HF. 584; natural bent, 
F 608, 619; natural disposition, HF. 43; 
natural ordinance, 3. 494 ; kind, species, 
5. 174; 0/ k., by nature, naturally, F 
768 ; pi. sorts, HF. 204. 

Kinde, adj. kind, A 647; natural, HF. 
834. 836. 

Kinde, adv. kindly, 7. 267. 

Kindely, adj. natural, HF. 842. 

Kindely, adv. by nature, D 402; natu- 
rally, HF. 832. 

Kindenesse, s. kindness, 4. 298 ; love, 
devotion, L. 665. 

King-es note, the name of a tune, A 3217. 

Kinrede, s. kindred, B 2558 ; relations, 
A 1286; birth, A 2790; family, L. 2094. 

Kirtel, s. kirtle, A 3321. A kirtle usually 
means a short skirt with a body. 

Kissen, v. kiss, L. 761; Kiste,'//. pi. R. 
788 ; kist they been , they have kissed 
each other, B 1074. See Kesse. 

Kitte.//. s. cut, B 600, 1761. 

Knakkes, s. pi. tricks, I 652; contempti- 
ble ways, 3. 1033. 

Knarre, s. a thickset fellow, sturdy churl, 

A 549- 
Knarry, adj. gnarled, A 1977. 
Knave, s. boy, servant-lad, page, R. 886; 

man-servant, servant, L. 1807; peasant, 

D 1190; Knave child, male child, B 715. 
Knavish, adj. rude, H 205. 
Knede, v. knead, A 4094; Kneden, pp. 

kneaded, R. 217. 
Knet, Knette; see Knitte. 



Knettinge, s. chain, B 5. p i. 39. 
Knightly, adv. bravely, L. 2085. 
Knitte, ger. to knit, I 47; o. pr. s. rejl. 

joinest (thyself), art in conjunction, B 

307; Knit, pp. L. 89; conjoined, 5. 381; 

agreed, F 1230; wedded, F 986; joined 

in love, 4. 50; Knet,//. R. 1397. 
Knittinges, pi. connections, B 5. m 3. 18. 
Knobbes, pi. large pimples, A 633. 
Knoppe, s. bud, R. 1702. 
Knotte, s. knot, gist of a tale, F 401, 407. 
Knotteles, adj. without a knot, T. v. 769. 
Knotty, adj. covered with knots, A 1977. 
Knowe, dat. knee, T. ii. 1202. 
Knowe, v. know, A 382; Knowestow, 

thou knowest, A 3156; Knewe, 2. pt. s. 

knewest, 10. 21; Knew, //. s. A 240; 

Knewe, i pt. s. subj. could know, F 466 ; 

Knewe, pt. pi. D 1341 ; Knewe, //. s. 

subj. were to know, R. 282; Knowen,//. 

known, L. 421 ; shown, B 2702; Knowe, 

pp. known, L. 1382. 
Knowing, s. knowledge, R. 1699; con- 
sciousness, 6. 114. 
Knowinge, adj. conscious, B 3. p 11. 168 ; 

Knowinge with me, i. e. my witnesses, 

B I. p 4. 50. 
Knowlecheth, pr. s. acknowledges, B 

2964. 
Knowleching, s. knowing, knowledge, 

G 1432 ; cognition, B 5. p 5. 3. 
Konning. s. cunning, skill, F 251. 
Konninge, adj. skilful, T. i. 302. 
Kukkow ! int. cuckoo ! 5. 499, 
Kyken, /;-. //. peep, A 3841 ; pp. gazed, 

A 3445. Icel. kikja, Swed. kika. 
Kyn. //. kine, cows, B 4021. 
Kyndely, adj. natural, 3. 761. 
Kyndely, adv. naturallv, by nature, 3. 

77S. 
Kyte, s. kite (bird), A 1179. 
Kythe, v. shew, shew plainly, display, 

F 748 ; declare to be, 7. 228 ; shew, 10. 

63 ; pr. s. shews, L. 504 ; Kidde, pt. s. 

shewed, T. i. 208 ; Kid, pp. made known, 

L. 1028 ; known, 9. 46 ; Kythed, pp. 

shewn, G 1054; Kythe, pr. s. subj. may 

shew, B 636 ; Kyth, if;ip. s. shew, T. iv. 

538; display, T. iv. 619; HF. 528; 

Kytheth, imp.pl. 4. 298. 



Ii. 
Laas ; see Las. 
-^Labbe, s. blab, tell-tale, A 3509. 
Labbing, pres. part, blabbing, babbling, 

E 2428. 
Label, .?. the narrow revolving rod or 



(^lossarial Entjex. 



6i 



rule on the front of the astrolabe, A. i. 

22. I. 

Ldborous, adj. laborious, D 1428. 

Lacche, s. snare, springe, R. 1624. 

Lace ; see Las. 

Laced, pp. laced up, A 3267. 

Lacerte, s. a fleshy muscle, A 2753, 

Lache, adj. lazy, dull, B 4. p 3. 132. 

Lachesse, s. laziness, I 720. 

Lacinge, s. lacing ; with lay iter es /,, with 
the fastening up of straps, A 2504. 

Lad, Ladde ; see Lede. 

Lade, ger. to load, cover, T. ii. 1544. 

Lady, gen. lady's, A 88, 695. 

Laft, Lafte; see Leve. 

Lak, s. want, defect, lack, 3. 958 ; blame, 
dispraise, L. 298 a ; Lakke, dat. lack, 
want, 5. 87, 615 ; loss, F 430 ; ace. fault, 
E 2199. 

Lake, s. a kind of fine white linen cloth, 
B 2048. The word probably was im- 
ported from the Low Countries, as 
laken is a common Dutch word for 
cloth or a sheet, 

Lakken, v. find fault with, disparage, 
blame, R. 284 ; pr. s. lacks, B 1437 ; pr. 
s. impers. lacks ; me lakketh, I lack, 2. 105. 

Lakking, s. lack, stint, R. 1147. 

Lambish, adj. gentle as lambs, 9. 50. 

Lampe, s. lamina, thin plate, G 764. 
F. lame, a, thin plate, Lat, lamina. 

Lange, adj. long (Northern), A 4175. 

Langdur, s. weakness, i. 7 ; slow starva- 
tion, R. 214; B 3597; languishing, R. 
304; sickness, F iioi. 

Lang-uisshe, v. fail, HF. 2018. 

Lapidaire, a treatise on precious stones, 
HF. 1352. 

Lappe, s. fold, lappet, or edge of a gar- 
ment, F 441, G 12; lap, A 686; a wrap- 
per, E 585. 

Lappeth, pr, s. enfolds, embraces, 4. 76. 

Large, adj. large, A 472, 753 ; great, I 705 ; 
wide, broad, R. 1351 ; liberal, bounteous, 
R. 1 168 ; at his /., free (to speak or to be 
silent), A 2288; free to move, HF. 745; 
at our /., free (to go anywhere), D 322. 

Large, adv. liberally, i. 174. 

Largely", adv. fully, A 1908 ; in a wide 
sense, I 804. 

Largenesse, s. liberality, I 1051. 

Largesse, s. liberality, R. 1150; bounty, 
B 2465 ; liberal bestower, i. 13. 

Las, s. lace, snare, entanglement, L. 600; 
net, A 2389 ; Laas, lace, i. e. thick string, * 
A 392; band, G 574; lace (i. e. laces), R. 
843 ; Lace, snare, entanglement, 18. 50. 

Lasse, adj. comp. less, R. 118; lesser, 



A 1756; smaller, B 2262; less (time), 
A 3519; lasse and more, smaller and 
greater, i. e. all, E 67; the lasse, the 
lesser, R. 187. 
Lasse, adv. less, 3. 927 ; the las, the less, 

3- 675- 

Last, s. pi. lasts, i. e. burdens, loads, 
B 1628. A. S. hlcBst, a burden, load, 
a ship's freight. 

Laste, adj. last, 10. 71 ; atte /., at last, 3. 
364 ; lastly, A 707. 

Laste, V. endure, 4. 226; Last,/;-, s. lasts, 
E 266; Laste, pt. s. lasted, B 1826; 
delayed, L. 791. 

Late, adj. late; bet than never is late, 
G 1410 ; til now late, till it was already 
late, 3. 45. 

Late, -n, let; see Lete. 

Lathe, s. barn (Northern), HF. 2140; 
A 4088. Icel. hlaSa. 

Latis, s. lattice, T. ii. 615. 

Latitude, s. (i) breadth, A. i. 21. 43; 
(2) the breadth of a climate, or a line 
along which such breadth is measured, 
A. ii. 39. 42; (3) astronomical, the angu- 
lar distance of any body from the ecliptic, 
measured along a great circle at right 
angles to the ecliptic, A. pr. no ; (4) ter- 
restrial, the distance of a place N. or S. 
of the equator, E 1797. 

Latoun, s. latten, a compound metal, 
like pinchbeck, containing chiefly copper 
and zinc, A 699. 

Latrede, adj. tardy, dawdling, I 718. 
A. S. latrcBde. 

Latter, adv. more slowly, I 971. 

Laude, s. praise, honour, HF. 1575; pi. 
lauds, a service held at 2 or 3 a.m., A 

3655- 
Laughe, v. laugh, A 474; Laugheth of, 

smiles on account of, A 1494 ; Lough, 

strong pt. s. laughed, R. 248 ; Laughede, 

7oeak pt. pi. R. 863. 
Launce, v. rear, HF. 946. 
Launcegay, s. a kind of lance, B 1942, 

201 1. Originally of Moorish origin. 
Launcheth, pr. s. pushes, lets slide, D 

2145. 
Launde, s. a grassy clearing (called dale 

in 5. 327) , 5. 302 ; glade, plain surrounded 

by trees, A 1691. 
Laure, s. laurel-tree, HF. 1107. 
Laureat, adj. crowned with laurel, B 

3886, E 31. 
Laurer, s. laurel-tree, 5. 182. 
Laurer-crouned, laurel-crowned, 7. 43. 
Lauriol, s. spurge-laurel. Daphne Lau- 

reola, B 4153. 



62 



(^lossarial Untjci. 



Laus, adj. loose, B 4. p 6. 147. 

Laven, ger. to exhaust, B 4. p 6. 14; 
Laved, pp. drawn up, B 3. m 12. 125. 
A. S. lafian. 

Lavender, s. laundress, L. 358. 

Laverokkes, pi. sky-larks, R. 662. 

Lavours,//. basins, D 287. 

Laxatif , adj. as s. looseness, A 2736 ; s. 
laxative, B 4133. 

Lay (i), s. song, lay, B 1959; Layes, //. 
songs, F 710, 712, 947. 

Lay (2), s. law; hence belief, faith, T. i. 
340 ; creed, L. 336. 

Layneres, pi. straps, thongs, A 2504. 
O. F. laniere ; mod, E, lanyard. 

Layser, s. leisure, T. ii. 227. 

'Li2^7,?ijv: ^ s. leper, A 242. 

Leche, s. physician, A 3904, C 916. 

Lechecraft, s. art of medicine, T. iv. 436 ; 
skill of a physician, A 2745. 

Lecher, s. healer, B 4. p 6. 238. 

Lechour, s. lecher, B 1935. 

Lede, v. lead, T. i. 259 ; carry, T. iv. 1514 ; 
lead, take, L. 2021; draw, R. 1608; 
govern, B 434; lead (his life), R. 1321 ; 
lead, R. 1129; Lede.^^r. to lead, spend, 
F 744 ; to guide, R. 400 ; Let,//-, s. leads, 
T. ii. 882; Ladde, pt. s. led, R. 581; 
brought, 7. 39; carried, L. 114; con- 
ducted, B 3747 ; continued, R. 216 ; 
Ladden, //. //. led, R. 1310; Ledden, 
p/'. pi. 9. 2 ; Ladde, pt. pi. B 3920 ; Lad, 
pp. led, L. 1108, 1948; brought, A 2620; 
conducted, A 4402 ; carried, L. 74. 

Leden, adj. leaden, G 728. 

Ledene, s. {dat.) language, talk, F 435, 
478. 

Leed, s. lead (metal), HF. 739, 1448, 1648; 
a copper, or caldron, A 202. 

Leef , adj. lief, A 1837 ; dear, R. 103 ; pre- 
cious, G 1467 ; lief, pleasing, T. v, 1738 ; 
pleasant, R, 1688 ; yow so leef, so desired 
by you, C 760; that leef 7ne were, which 
I should like, HF. 1999; Leve, def. dear 
(one), A 3393; vocative, HF. 816; Lefe, 
adj. fern. voc. HF. 1827; Leve, pi. dear, 
T. iv. 82, V. 592. 

Leef, adj. as s. what is pleasant ; for l. ne 
looth, for weal nor for woe, L. 1639; 
what is dear (to him), T. iv. 1585; be- 
loved one, lover, lady-love, T. iii. 3. 

Leef, s. leaf, L. 72 ; Leves, pi. leaves, R. 
56 ; (of a book) , D 790. 

Leefful; see LevefuL 

Leefsel, s. the ' bush ' or leafy bundle (as 
a sign), at a tavern-door, I 411 ; Levesel, 
arbour of leaves, A 4060. Cf. Swed. 
lofsal, a hut made of green boughs. 



Leek, s. leek, R. 212 ; a thing of no value, 

G795- 
Leen, imp. s. of Lene. 
Leep (le6p), />/. s. of Lepe. 
Lees (16s6), s. leash, G 19; snare, 7. 233. 
Lees, adj. untrue, R. 8. 
Lees (l^es), s. deceit, fraud; a shrewed 

lees, a wicked fraud, L. 1545 ; withouten 

lees, without deceit, verily, HF. 1464. 
Lees, pt. s. of Lese. 
Leeste, adj. sup. least, B 2513; atte I. 

weye, at the very least, A 1121. 
Leet,//". s. of Lete, 
Lef, i7np. s. of Leve (leave). 
Lefe, adj. fern. voc. dear, HF. 1827. 
Leful : see Leveful. 
Leg-g-e, -n ; see Leye, v. 
Leide, \pt. s. of Leye. 
Leig-h, pt. s. of Lye (2). 
Lekes, //. leeks, A 634, 
Lemes, pi. flames, B 4120. A. S. leoma. 
Lemman, s. masc. (male) lover, sweet- 
heart, A 4240, 42^7; fern, (female) lover, 

lady-love, A 3278, 3280 ; concubines, I 903. 
Lendes, pi. loins, A 3237, 3304. A. S. 

Ie7iden, pi. lendetiu. 
Lene, adj. lean, thin, R. 218, 444; weak, 

T. ii. 132. 
Lene, ger. to lend, give, A 611 ; Lene, 

imp. s. lend, B 1376; Leen, imp. s. give, 

A 3082. A. S. l^nan. 
Lene, v. lean, incline, B 2638. 
Leng", adv. longer; ever I. the wers, the 

worse, the longer it lasts, A 3872. 
Leng'er, adj. longer, L. 450, 2025. 
Lenger, adv. longer, B 374, 2122, 3709; 

ever the I., the longer, the more, 7. 129; 

ever I. the more, E 687. 
Lengest, adv. sup. longest, 5. 549. 
Lente, s. Lent-season, D 543. 
Lenvoy, s. I'envoy, i. e. the epilogue or 

postscript addressed to the hearers or 

readers, E 1177 {rubric). 
Leonesse, s. lioness, L. 805. 
Leonyn, adj. lionlike, B 3836. 
Leos, s. people, G 103, 106. Gk. A^eoi?. 
Leoun, s. lion, L. 627, 829 ; Leon, the 

sign Leo, F 265. 
Lepdrt, s. leopard, A 2186; Libardes, //. 

R. 894. 
Lepe, v. run, A 4378 ; leap, L. 2008 ; Lepe 

up, V. leap up, HF. 2150; Leep, //. s. 

leapt, A 2687. 
Lere, s. flesh, skin, B 2047. Properly the 

muscles, especially the muscles of the 

thigh, which special sense is perfectly 

suitable here. A. S. lira, flesh, muscle. 
ljere,ger. (i) to teach, 7.98 ; z/. teach, T. iv. 



(glossarial lEntiex. 



63 



441 ; (2) to learn, T. v. 161 ; L,ere,^er. to 

learn, find out, D 909; l^ere, pr. p/. (i) 

teach, 5. 25; (2) learn, F 104; Lered,//. 

(2) learnt, T. ill. 406. 
Lered, adj. instructed, learned, C 283 ; 

A. S. /cered. 
Lerne, v. learn, A 308, D 994; Lerned of, 

taught by, G 748. (Chaucer here uses 

the word wrongly, as in mod. provincial 

English.) 
Lese, s. dat. pasture, T. 11. 752; HF. 1768. 

A. S. IcBs. 
Lese, V. lose, A 1215, 1290; Lese me, v. 

lose myself, be lost, 5. 147 ; Lees, pt. s. 

lost, L. 945 ; Leseth, imp. pi. B 19 ; 

Loren,/'/'. lost, L. 1048; Lorn, //>, lost, 

T' J- 373. iii- 1076, iv. 1613 ; forlorn, 

wasted, R. 366. 
Lesing-, s. falsehood, He, HF. 2089; G 

479; Lesinges, pi. lies, deceits, R. 2; 

lying reports, HF. 2123. 
Lesinge, J. loss, 1 1056; Leslng, A 1707; 

for leshige, for fear of losing, B 3750. 
Lessoun, s. lesson, lection, A 709. 
Lest, J. pleasure, 3. 908; delight, A 132; 

desire, E 619; inclination, HF. 287; 

Lestes,//. desires, HF. 1738. A Kentish 

form ; for lust. 
T-iBSt, pr. s. ivipers. (it) pleases, L. 1703; 

(it) pleases (me), D 360; Thee lest, it 

pleases thee, 5. 114; Lesteth, (it) pleases, 

L. 480 a; 'L,&?>ie,pt.s. impers. (it) pleased, 

T. V. 517; pers. was pleased, T. iii. 452; 

Leste,;>r, s. subj. (it) may please, L. 1338 ; 

As yow leste, as it may please you, L. 

449 ; (It) would please, F 380 ; Her leste, 

it should please her, 5. 551. Kentish 

forms. 
Leste, adj. superl. least, T. 1. 281 ; at the 

L, at least, 3. 973 ; atte /., at least, B 38 ; 

Leste, as s., the least one, 3. 283 ; at the 

leeste weye, at any rate, E 966. 
Let, pr. s. of Lede. 
Lete, V. let, B 3524; let, leave, A 1335; 

give up, let go, T. v. 1688 ; forsake, T. 

iv. 1199; let alone, leave, D 1276; quit, 

I. 72; give up, lose, G 406; omit, depart 

from, 5. 391 ; Lete of, ger. to leave off, 

18. 52 ; Leten, v. let, L. 2107 ; give up, R. 

1690 ; forsake, T. iv. 1556 ; Leten, ger. to 

let go, T. i. 262 ; Late, v. let, T. iii. 693 ; 

Laten, v. let, A 3326 ; Lete, i pr. s. leave, 

7. 45; Let, pr. s. lets go, repels, 5. 151; 

Lat, //■. J. lets, permits, T. iv. 200; Lete, 

2 pr. pi. abandon, B 2505 ; Leet, pt. 's. 

let, A 128; let go, A 1206; allowed, HF. 

243 ; left off, A 3311 ; left, A 508 ; caused, 

permitted, B 373; caused, B 2194; 



caused (to be) , B 959 ; leet . . . fecche, 
commanded (men) to fetch, D 2064; leet 
don cryen, caused to be proclaimed, F 
45 ; leet make, caused to be made, B 
33491 l^^t binde, caused to be bound, B 
1810; Let, pt. s. caused, L. 2624; let 
calle, caused to be called, L. 1684 ; let, 5. 
279; Lete,//.//. let, B 3898; Lete, //. j-. 
subj. were to let, T. Hi. 1762 ; Leet, imp. 
s. let, C 731; Lat, imp. s. let, i. 79, 84; 
let alone, give up, T. 11. 1500 ; Lat be, let 
be, do away with, A 840; let me alone, 
A 3285; give up, HF. 992; Lat do, cause, 
C 173 ; Lat take, take, G 1254, H 175 ; 
Lat see, let us see, A 831 ; Lat goon, let 
slip (the dogs), L. 1213 ; Laten blood,//, 
let blood, A 4346. A. S. l^tan. 

Lette, s. hindrance, T. 1. 361; delay, T. 
iii. 235. 

Lette, V. hinder, T. ii. 732 ; prevent, L. 
732 ; oppose, stay, B 3306 ; cause delay, 
B 1 1 17; wait, B 1440; tarry, B 4224; 
stop, desist, B 4279; cease, R. 279; Letten, 
ger. to put obstacles in the way (of) , to 
decline (from), A 1317; Let, /r. s. pre- 
vents, B 3. p 10. 162 ; Lette, pr. s. subj. ; 
lette him no man,god forbede, God forbid 
that any should hinder him, T. iii. 
545 ; Letted, //. s. hindered, A 1891 ; 
was hindered, B 2591 ; Letteth, imp. pi. 
hesitate, T. ii. 1136. 

Lette-game, s. 'let-game,' one who hin- 
ders sport, T. iii. 527. 

Lettres, //. letters {also as sing, a letter), 

B 736 ; 5- 19- 
Lettrure, s. learning, B 3486; book-lore, 

B 3686. 
Letuarie, s. electuary, remedy, C 307; 

//. electuaries, A 426. Lat. electuarium. 
Leve, dear; see Leef. 
Leve, s. leave, B 1637,0 908; permission, 

L 2281 ; bisyde hir leve, without her 

leave, T. Hi. 622. 
Leve (i) , V. leave, E 250 ; let alone, G 714 ; 

let go, 3. iiii; go away, 5. 153; leave 

alone, T. i. 688 ; ger. to leave off, T. 1. 

686 ; to forsake, G 287 ; Leve, i pr. s. 

leave, 2. 50; Leveth, pr. s. remains, 3. 

701 ; Lafte, i //. s. left, C 762 ; Lefte, left 

off, F 670; Laften, //. //. L. 168; Left, 

//. omitted, I 231 ; Laft, //. left, L. 

1260 ; Leef, imp. s. leave, T. iv. 852 ; 

leave (it) alone, T. v. 1518 ; Lef, imp. s. 

forego, D 2089 ; Leve, imp. s. leave, A 

1614; Leveth, /;///. //. leave, C 659. 

A. S. Icefan. 
Leve (2) , z^. believe, 5. 496 ; L. 10 ; ger. to 

be believed, HF. 708; Levestow, be- 



64 



(glossarial 3Intiex. 



lievest thou, G 212 ; Leveth, imp. pi. 
believe, 6. 88. A. S. lefati, lyfan. 

Leve (3),<fi?/'. to allow, L. 2280; god leve, 
God grant, L, 2083, 2086. A. S. lefan, 
lyfan. 

Leveful, adj. allowable, A 3912; per- 
missible, D 37; Leefful, allowable, I 41, 
917 ; Leful, permissible, T. iii. 1020. 

Levene, s. flash of lightning, D 276, 

Lever, adj. cornp. liefer, rather ; me were 
lever, I had rather, T. i. 1034, iii. 574 ; me 
Ills lever, L. 191 ; thee were /., thou hadst 
rather, B 2339 ; him was I., A 293 ; him 
were I., L. 2413; have 1 1., I would rather. 
T. ii. 471 ; F 1360 ; hadde I /., D 168 ; 
hath /., F 692 ; hadde I., L. 1536 ; had hir 
/., she would rather, E 444 ; hi7n had 
be /., he would rather, A 3541. 

Levesel ; see Leefsel. 

Levest, sup. dearest, most desirable, HP. 
87. 

Lewed, adj. ignorant, A 502, 574; un- 
learned, C 283 ; unskilled, rude, HF. 
1096; wicked, foolish, F 1494; wanton, 
E 2129. A. S. IcBwed. 

Lewedly, adv. simply, HF. 866; igno- 
rantly, B 47 ; ill, G 430. 

Lewednesse, s. ignorance, ignorant be- 
haviour, D 1928. 

Ley, lied ; pt. s. of Lye. 

Leye, v. lay, 4. 205 ; lay, cause to he, T. 
iii. 659; lay a wager, HF. 674; pledge, 
T. iii. 1605 ; Leyn, ger. to lay up, to 
hoard, R. 184; Leggen, ^^r, to lay, A 
3269; Legge, v. A 3937; Leyth,/r. j. A 
4229; Leith,/r. s. D 2138; Leye, \ pr.pl. 
lay out, expend, G 783 ; Leyn, pr. pi. 
lay, H 222 ; Leyde, pt. s. 3. 394 ; Leyde, 
2 pt. pi. L. 2501 ; Ley den forth, pt. pi. 
brought forward, B 213; 'Leyd, pp. laid, 
A 3262; placed, R. 1184; overlaid, R. 
1076 ; / was leyd, I had laid myself 
down, L. 208; Leyd, pp. laid, A 81; 
fixed, 3. 1146; set, 3. 1036; Ley on, lay 
on, A 2558. 

Leyser, s. leisure, R. 462; A 1188; de- 
liberation, B 2766 ; opportunity, A 3293. 

Leyt, s. flame (of a candle), I 954. A. S. 
leget, lyget, M. E. leit, lightning. 

Libardes, pi. leopards, R. 894. 

Libel, s. written declaration, D 1595. 

Licentiat, adj. one licensed by the pope 
to hear confessions, independently of 
the local ordinaries, A 220. 

Liche, adj. like, R. 1073; similar, 7. 76; 
// liche, like it, F 62. 

Liche, adv. alike, HF. 10. 

Liche-wake , j. watch over a corpse, A 2958. 



Licoryce, s. liquorice, R. 1368. 

Llc6ur, s. moisture, A 3 ; liquor, T. iv. 
520 ; Licour, juice, C 452. 

Lief, adj. dear, A 3501 ; Lief to, glad to, 
given to, A 3510; cherished, E 479; 
goode leef my wyf, my dear good wife, 
B 3084 ; hadde as lief, would as soon, D 
1574 ; as s, dear one, B 4069. 

Lift, adj. left (said of the left hand or 
side), R. 163. 

Lige, adj. liege, C 337 ; Lige man, vassal, 
L. 379 ; Liges, s. pi. vassals, L. 382 ; pi. 
subjects, B 240. F. lige, from O. H. G. 
ledic (G. ledig) , free. A liege lord was a 
free lord ; in course of time his subjects 
were called lieges, from confusion with 
Lat. ligare, to bind. 

Ligeaunce, s. allegiance, B 895. 

Liggen, v. lie, B 2101; Ligginge, //vi^. //. 
lying, T. iv. 29; Ligging, A loii. 

Light, adj. lightsome, joyous, R. 'j'] ; 3. 
1 175; active, nimble, R. 832; easy, 3. 
526 ; wearing but few clothes (a/jo, fickle), 
21. 20; Lighte, //. light (of weight), 5. 
188 ; easy, A. pr. 36. 

Lighte, adv. brilliantly, R. 1109. 

Lighte, <^^r. (i) to make light, rejoice, T. 
v. 634; to render cheerful, T. i. 293; 
alleviate, T. iii. 1082; (2) ger. to feel 
light, to be glad, F 396, 914; Lighte, 
pt. s. lighted; either in the sense (i) 
lightened, made light, made happy, or 
(2) illuminated, B 1661. 

Lig-hte, V. alight, descend, HF. 508 ; //. s. 
alighted, B 786. 

Lighten, v. shine, I 1037 ; Lighted, pp. 
brightened, i. 74; Light,//, illuminated, 
L. 2506; Lighte, imp. s. illumine, G 71. 

Lightly, adv. lightly, F 390; readily, 4. 
205; quickly, I 534; easily, T. ii. 289; 
carelessly, I 1023 ; joyfully, A 1870. 

Lightned, pp. enlightened, illuminated, 
F 1050. 

Lightnesse (i), s. brightness, 5. 263. 

Lightnesse (2), s. agility, A 3383. 

Lightsom, adj. gay, R. 936. 

Ligne, s. line, T. v. 1481. 

Ligne-aloes, wood of the aloe, T. iv. 
1 137. (Properly a compound, i. e. ligne- 
aloes ; where aloes is a plural form.) 

Likerous, ^j^'. lecherous, H 189; wanton, 
A 3244, 3345, E 214 ; gluttonous, C 540 ; 
greedy after indulgence, D 466; eager, 
F 1 1 19; very vile (Lat. nequissimi~), B 3. 

P4-3I- ^ 

Likerousnesse, s. lecherousness, D 611 ; 

licentiousness, I 430; greediness, I 377; 

eagerness, I 741 ; appetite, C 84. 



(^lossarial hxtitx. 



6S 



Liilting'-horne, s. horn to be played for 
a lilt, HF. 1223. 

Limaille ; see Lymaille, 

Lime, s. limb, 3.. 499; Limes,//. R. 830. 

Limitacioun, s. limit, D 877. 

Limitour, s. limitor, a friar licensed to 
beg for alms within a certain limit, A 
209, D 874. 

Linage, J-, lineage, race, A mo; family, 
D 1135; noble family, R. 258; high 
birth, B 3441 ; kinsfolk, B 2192 ; kin- 
dred, B 999 ; consanguinity, L. 2602. 

Lind, s. lime-tree, A 2922. 

Lipsed, //. s. lisped, A 264. 

Lisse, s. comfort, T. v. 550; joy, T. iii. 
343; assuaging, HF. 220; solace, 3. 1040 ; 
alleviation, F 1238. A. S. liss. 

Lissen, v. alleviate, T. i. 702 ; soothe, 6. 
6; Lissed, //. relieved, F 1170. A. S. 
/issian. 

List (i), s. pleasure, T. iii. 1303; will, 
D 633. 

List (2), s. ear, D 634. A. S. /tfyst 

List, pr. s. impers. it pleases {usually with 
dat.), A 1021, B 521 ; me list right evel, I 
was in no mind to, 3. 239 ; you list, 
it pleases you, 11. 77; List, pr. s. 
pers. is pleased, pleases, T. i. 518, 797; 
wishes, A 3176; Listeth, pr. s. impers. 
(it) pleases, T. ii. 700 ; pers. pleases, is 
pleased, HF. 511; likes, F 689; Listen, 
2. pr.pl. are pleased, T. iii. 1810; Listen, 
pr. pi. list, choose, B 2234 ; Listen 
trete, choose to write, L. 575 ; Liste, 
pt. s. impers. (it pleased) , L. 332 ; her 
liste, it pleased her, she cared, 7. 190; 
him liste, he wanted, 4. 92; hefn liste, 
(it) pleased them, F 851. A. S. lystan. 

Listes, //. i7i sing, sense, lists, a place 
enclosed for tournaments, A 63. 

Listes, s. pi. wiles ; in his I., by means of 
his wiles, i. 85. 

Listeth, imp.pl. listen ye, B 1902. 

Litarge, s. litharge, ointment prepared 
from protoxide of lead, A 629 ; protoxide 
of lead, G 775. 

Litarg-ie, s. lethargy, B i. p 2. 22. 

Lite, adj. little, I 295 ; as s., a little, T. i. 
291 ; adv. little, T. iv. 1330. 

Litestere, s. dyer, 9. 17. I eel. Uta, to dye. 

Lith, J-. limb (viz. of herself), B 4065. A. S. 
1115. 

Litherly, adv. ill, A 3299. A. S. ryl5er, evil. 

Livere {i), s. liver, D 1839. 

Livere (2),^. liver (one who lives) , B 1024. 

Liveree, s. livery, A 363. 

Livinge, s. life-time, 7. 188; manner of 
life, C 107 ; state of life, G 322. 



Lixt, liest; see Lye (2). 

Lode, s. load, A 2918. 

Lodenaenag-e, s. pilotage, A 403. Lode- 
jnanage is the hire of a pilot, for con- 
ducting a ship from one place to another, 

Lodesmen, s. pi. pilots, L. 1488. 

Lode-Sterre, s. polar star, lodestar, A 
2059. 

Lofte, dat. upper room, L. 2709; on lofte,. 
in the air, HF. 1727; aloft, B 277. 

Logge, s. resting-place, B 4043. 

Logging, s. lodging, B 4185. 

Loke, V. {weak) lock up, D 317. 

Loken, ger. to look, A 1783 ; v. behold^ 
R. 812; Loked, //. s. looked, A 289; 
Lokeden,//. pi. L. 1972; imp.s. see, HF. 
893 ; take heed, D 1587 ; Loke he, let 
him take heed, I 134; Loketh, imp. pL 
behold, G 1329; search ye, C 578. 

Loken,/)/. ofstrongverb (Louken) , locked 
up, B 4065. 

Loking, s. look, gaze, 3. 870; counte- 
nance, B 2332 ; glance, L. 240 ; glance (of 
the eye), A 2171 ; aspect, 4. 51 ; examin- 
ing, 5. no; appearance, R. 290; looks, 
F 285. 

Lokkes, //. locks of hair, A 81, 677. 

Loller, s. a loUer, a lollard, B 1173. Loller 
(one who is sluggish) was confused with 
the name Lollard. 

Lomb, s. lamb, L. 1798. 

Lond, s. land, A 194, 400, 579; country, 
B 3548 ; upon lond, in the country, A 
702. 

Lone, s. dat. loan, B 1485 ; gift, grace, D 
1861. 

Long,//-^/. ; the i^Xxxasq wher-on . . long 
— long on wher, along of what, G 930 ; 
Long on, along of, because of, G 922. 

Long, adj. {before a vowel), tall, R. 817; 
pi. tall, high, R. 1384; long, A 93. 

Longe, adv. long, A 286 ; for a long time,. 
L. 2261. 

Longe (i), V. desire, long for, L. 2260; 
yearn, T. ii. 546; Longen (2), v. belong,. 
A 2278 ; pr. s. belongs, R. 754; (it) con- 
cerns, T. ii. 312; pr. pi. belong, F 1131 ; 
pt. s. befitted, R. 1222; Longing for,, 
suitable for, F 39. 

Longes, pi. lungs, A 2752. 

Longitude, s. the distance between two 
given meridians, A. ii. 39. 19; the length 
or extent of a ' climate,' in a direction 
parallel to the equator, or rather a line 
along which to measure this length ; 
A. ii. 39. 28. The longitude of a star is- 
measured along the zodiac ; that of a. 
town, from a fixed meridian. 



66 



(glossarial Sntiex. 



LiOOS, s. praise, renown, B 2834, 3036. 

O. F. /OS. 
Loos, adj. loose, A 4064, 4138 ; Lous, free, 

HF. 1286. 
Lootll (looth), adj. loath, odious, A 486; 

hateful, A 3393; Me were /., it would 

displease me, B 91 ; as s., what is hate- 
ful, misery, L. 1639. 
LiOOthly, adj. hideous, D iioo. 
Loppe, s. a spider, A. i. 3. 6. 
Loppe"webbe, s. cobweb, A. i. 21. 3. 
Lordeth,//-. s., rules over, 4. 166. 
LiOrding'S, s.pl. sirs, C 329, 573. 
Lore, s. teaching, L. 2450; advice, T. i. 

1090; lesson, T. i. 645, 754; instruction, 

B 342 ; learning, B 761 ; study, G 842 ; 

profit, 5. 15 ; doctrine, A 527. A. S. lar. 
Lore, pp. of Lese. 
Loral, s. worthless man, abandoned 

wretch, D 273. 
Loren, //. of Lese. 
Lorer, s. laurel, R. 1379. 
Lorn, pp. of Lese. 

Los (i), s. loss, A 2543; occasion of per- 
dition, D 720. 
Los (2), s. praise, renown, fame, L. 1514; 

report, L. 1424 ; /// her loses, in praise 

of them, HF. 1688. O. F, los. 
Losengere, s. flatterer, R. 1050;//. R. 

1056. O. F. lose7jgeitr. 
Losengerie, s. flattery, I 613. 
Losenges,//. lozenges, HF. 1317; small 

diamond-shaped shields, R. 893. 
Lost, s. loss, B 2. p 4. 185. 
Loth, adj. loath, 3. 8; displeasing, R. 233. 
Lother, adj. cotnp. more hateful, L. 191. 
Lothest, adj. superl. most loath, F 1313. 
Lotinge, pres.part. lurking, G 186. A. S. 

liitian, to lurk. 
Loude, adv. loudly, A 171. 
Lough, //. s. of Laughe. 
Louke, s. accomplice, A 4415. 
Loured,//', frowned, HF. 409. 
Lous. adj. loose, free, HF. 1286. 
Lousy, adj. full of lice, miserable, D 1467. 
Loute, V. bow, do obeisance, T. iii. 683; 

ger. to bow down, B 3352 ; \pt. s. stooped, 

bent, R. 1554. 
Love, s. love, A 475 ; fern, lady-love, 4. 31 ; 

vac. O my love, A 672 ; masc. lover, L. 

862. 
Lovedayes, pi. days for settling disputes 

bv arbitration, A 2^8 ; HF. 695. 
Love-drury, s. affection, B 2085. The 

latter part of the word is O. F. drurie, 

dn/erie, love, passion. 
Loveknotte, s. looped ornament, A 197. 
Loves, s.pl. loaves, B 503. 



Lovyere, s. lover, A 80, 

Lowenesse, s. lowliness, I 1080. 

Lowly, adj. humble, A 99. 

Luce, s. luce, pike, A 350. 

Lucre, s. lucre, gain, G 1402; lucre of 

vilanye = vile gain, B 1681. 
Lufsom, adj. lovely, T. v. 911 ; lovable, T. 

v. 465. 
Lulleth, pr. s. lulls, soothes, B 839. 
Luna, s. the moon, G 826; a name for 

silver, G 1440. 
Lundrie, s. lunary, moon-wort, G 800. 
Lure, s. a hawk's lure, D 1340; //. entice- 
ments, L. 1371. 
Lussheburghes, //. spurious coin, B 

3152. Named from the town of Luxe7/i- 

Iwurg. 
Lust, s. desire, R. 1653; amusement, R. 

1287; pleasure, R. 616; delight, i. 106; 

will, desire, wish, B 188; interest in a 

story, F402; pi. delights, 3. 581. A. S. 

lust. 
Lusteth, jz!'/'. s. impers. (it) pleases, L. 996 ; 

Lust,/r. s.pers. pleases, E 1344; impers. 

(it) pleases, E 322; Luste, //. s.pers. 

desired, G 1344; Luste,//. s. wipers, it 

pleased, G 1235. 
Lustier, more joyous, G 1345. 
Lustihede. s. cheerfulness, 3. 27 ; delight, 

H 274; enjoyment, F 288; vigour, L. 

1530- 

Lustily, adv. gaily, merrily, R. 1319. 

Lustinesse, s. pleasure, jollity, A 1939; 
vigour, R. 1282. 

Lusty, adj. pleasant, gay, A 80; jocund, 
F 272 ; lusty, H 41 ; joyous, R. 581 ; 
happy, R. 1303 ; joyful, A 1513 ; vigorous, 
L. 1038. 

Luxures, ^. pi. lusts, B 3. p 7. 12. 

Luxurie, s. lechery, B 925, C 484. 

Lyard, adj. grey, D 1563. 

Lycorys, s. liquorice, A 3690. 

Lye (i), V. lie, remain, 10.52; 'L\'e,ger. to 
lodge, D 1780 ; Lye . . by, v. lie beside, 
B 3470 ; Lye upright, lie on one's back, 
lie dead, R. 1604; Lystow, thou liest, H 
276; Lyth, pr. s. lies, is, remains, R. 
782; lies, 3. 146, 181; (he) lies, B 634; 
(that) lies, D 1829; remains, resides, B 
3654; lies (dead), 3. 143; Lyth therto, 
belongs here, is needed, 3. 527 ; Lay, 
I pi. s. lodged, A 20; was, A 538; Lave, 
pi. s. subj. would lie, T. iv. 1560; Ly, 
imp. s. T. ii. 953. 

Lye (2), V. tell lies, lie, A 763; Lixt, 2 
pr. s. liest, D 1618, 1761 ; Ley, strong 
pt. s. lied, T. ii. 1077 ; Lyed, weak pt. s. 
lied, A 659. A. S. leogan. 



(Jllossarial Untiex. 



67 



Lye (3), V. blaze, D 1142. A. S. lyge,s. 
flame. 

Lyer, s. liar, B 2256. 

Lyes, s.pl. lees, dregs, HF. 2130. 

Lyes, //. (i) lees; or (2) lies, D 302. 
Perhaps a double meaning is intended. 

Lyf, s. life, A 71, 2776; Lyves, ^^«. life's, 
6. 60; of my life, 3. 920; Our present 
worldes lyves space, the space of our 
present life in the world, 5. 53 ; Lyves 
day, lifetime, L. 1624 ; Lyve, dat. L 59 ; 
On lyve, alive, L 1792; in his time, D 
43 ; Upon lyve, alive, T. ii. 1030 ; Of 
lyve, out of life, T. v. 1561 ; Bringe of 
lyve, cause to die, T. ii. 1608 ; My lyve, 
in my life, T. ii. 205 ; By thy lyf, during 
thy life, B 1621 ; Thy lyf, during thy 
lifetime, 17. 19; His lyve, in his life, L. 
1099 i Hir lyve, in their life, D 392 ; 
Lyves, pi. B 3284. 

Lyflode, s. means of living, I 685. Mod. 
E. livelihood. 

Lyfly, adv. in a lifelike way, A 2087. 

Lyke, v. please, T. i. 431 ; ger. HF. 860; 
to be liked, R. 1357; Lyketh, pr. s. 
pleases, E 1031 ; impers. (it) pleases, E 
311, 845; us I. yow, it pleases us with 
respect to you, E 106 ; Lyke, pr. s. sabj. 
may please, D 1278 ; thee I. ?iat, it may 
not please you, L. 490 ; Lyked, pt. s. 
impers. pleased, R. 1312. 

Lyking", s. pleasure, C 455; delight, B 

3499- 
Lykingr, adj. pleasing, R. 868; pleasant, 

R. 14 16; thriving, R. 1564. 
Lyklihed, s. dat. likelihood, E 448. 
Lyklinesse, s. probability, 22. 15. 
Lykly, adj. likely, like, 16. 32. 
Lykne, \pr. s. compare, 3. 636. 
Lyknesse, s. parable, A 2842. 
Lym, s. lime, F 1149; quicklime, L. 649. 
Lymaille, s. filings of any metal, G 1162; 

Lymail, G 1164; Limaille, G 853. 
Lyme,^^/-. to cover with birdlime, T. i.353. 
Lymere, s. hound held in leash, 3. 365. 
Lymrod, s. lime-twig, B 3574. 
Lyne, s. line, T. i. 1068 ; fishing-line, 4. 

242; line of descent, D 1135; as lyne 

right, straight as a line, T. iii. 228. 
Lyned, pp. lined, A 440. 
Lyne-right, adj. in an exact line, exactly 

in a line with, A. i. 21. 31. 
Lyoun, s. lion, T. iii. 1780; v. 830; 

Lyouns, />/. R. 894. See Leoun. 
Lyst, 2 pr. s. liest, reclinest, T. ii. 991 ; 

Lystow, liest thou, H 276. 
Lytargye, s. lethargy, T. i. 730. 
Lyte, adj. small, little, R. 532; slight. 



I 689 ; Lyte, s. a little, L. 29, 535 ; Lyte, 

pi. little, A 494. 
Lyte, adv. little, 3. 884; a little, E 935; 

in a small degree, G 632, 699; /. and I., 

by little and little, D 2235. 
Lythe, adj. easy, soft, HF. 118. 
Lythe, ger. to alleviate, cheer, T. iv. 754. 
Lyve ; see Lyf. 

Lyvely. adv. in a lively way, 3. 905. 
Lyves; see Lyf. 
Lyves, adv. in life; hence, as adj. living, 

alive, T. iv. 252 ; no lyves creature, no 

living creature, T. iii. 13. 

M. 

M', soiiietitnesput forMe (before avowal) ; 
as in masterte/br me asterte. 

Ma fey, my faith ! T. iii. 52. 

Maad; pp. <?/Make. 

Maat, adj. dejected, B 2. p 4. 42. 

Mad, pp. made, L. 286. See Make. 

Madde, v. go mad, 4. 253; ger. to be 
furious, T. i. 479. 

Mader, s. madder, 9. 17. 

Mag-ik, s. magic, A 416. 

Mag"istrat, s. magistracy, B 3. p 4. 26. 

Maheym, s. maiming, I 625. Mod. E. 
maim. 

Maille, s. mail, ringed armour, E 1202. 

Maister, s. master, B 1627 ; doctor, D 
2184; doctor (of divinity), D 1638; (as 
a term of address) , 17. i ; one in authority, 
A 261. 

Maisterful, adj. masterful, T. ii. 756. 

Maister-strete, s. main street, L. 1965. 

Maister-temple, s. chief temple, L. 1016. 

Maister-toun, s. chief town, L. 1591. 

Maister-tour, s. chief tower, F 226. 

Maistow, mayest thou, HF. 699. 

Maistresse, s. mistress, L. 88; govern- 
ess, C 106. 

Maistrye, s. mastery, great skill, A 3383; 
mastery, F 747, 764 ; control, B 3689, C 
58 ; superiority ; for the maistrye, as 
regards authority, A 165 ; victory, B 
3582; specimen of skill, HF. 1074; art, 
elegance, R. 842 ; a masterly operation 
(cf. F. coup de maltrc'), G 1060. 

Majestee, s.; his real majestee = his royal 
majesty, i. e. high treason, B i. p 4. 162. 

Make, s. mate, D 270, H 186; equal, 
match, A 2556 ; wedded companion, wife, 
B 700; bride, E 1882; husband, D 85. 

Make, v. make, A 184; compose, write, 
L. 69; ger. to compose, to write (about), 
R. 41 ; pretend to, counterfeit, T. ii. 
1522; cause (it), T. ii. 959; Makestow, 



68 



(glossaiial Untrx. 



2 pr. s. B 371 ; Maketh, pr. s. causes, A 
3035; Maken, pr. pi. make, utter, A 9; 
Maked, pt. s. made, A 526; Makeden, 
pt. pi. T. iv. 121 ; Made, pt. s. siibj. may 
have made, 4. 227 ; Made . . . broght, 
caused to be brought, HF. 155; Maked, 
pp. made, A 1247 ; composed, 5. 677 ; 
Maad, pp. made, A 394 ; Mad, //. 3. 415. 

Makelees, adj. peerless, T. i. 172. 

Making-, s. poetry, composition, L. 74, 

413. 483. 

Malapert, adj. forward, T. iii. 87. 

Male yx), s. bag, wallet, A 694, 31 15. 

Male (2), J-, male, D 122. 

Maleflce, s. evil contrivance, I 341. 

Mal^ncolyk, adj. melancholy, A 1375. 

Malgre, prep, in spite of, 4. 220. 

Malison, s. curse, I 443 ; cursing, I 619. 

Malliable, adj. malleable, such as can 
be worked bv the hammer, G 1130. 

Malt, //. X melted, HF. 922. 

Maltalent, s. ill-will, ill-humour, resent- 
ment, R. 273, 330. 

Man, s. A 167, 209, 223 ; (used indefinitely) 
one, B 43, D 2002 ; hero, B 3331 ; servant, 
I 772; Mannes, ^gf/. of mankind, T. ii. 
417; Men,//, men, people, 18. 26; A 
178 ; sin^. {unemphatic form c^/'man), one 
(with shig. verb) , A 149, 232, C 675, G 392. 

Manace, ^^er. to threaten, E 1752. 

Manasing-e, s. threatening, A 2035. 

Mandement, s. summons, D 1346. 

Maner, s. manor, place to dwell in, 3. 1004. 

Manere, s, manner, A 858, D 1229; de- 
portment, A 140; disposition, L. 251; 
manner, way, 3. 1130; ease of behaviour, 
3. 1218 ; goodly courtesy of manner, 4. 
294; o/i/ianere, in his behaviour, F 546; 
Maner, way, 3. 433; manner, kind, sort 
{used without oi follotving) , as in maner 
doctrine, B 1689; pi. kinds, R. 1406. 

Manhede, s. manliness, A 1285. 

Mannish, adj. manlike, T. i. 284; human, 
B 2454 ; unwomanly, B 782. 

Mannish, adv. like a man, boisterously, 
E 1536. 

Mansioun, s. dwelling, A 1974; (a term 
in astrology), F 50; mansion (of the 
moon), F 1285; pi. daily positions or 
' stations ' of the moon, F 1130. A man- 
sion of a planet is the sign (or signs) of 
the zodiac in which the planet was 
thought to be peculiarly at home, A 
mansion of the moon refers to its posi- 
tion dav by day in the sky. 

Mansuete, adj. courteous, T. v. 194. 

Mansuetude. s. meekness, I 654. 

Mantelet, s. short mantle, A 2163. 



Manye, s. mania, A 1374. 
Mappemounde, map of the world, 12. 2. 
Mapul, s. maple-tree, A 2923. 
Marble-stoon, s. piece of marble, R. 

1462. 
Marchal, s. marshal, E 1930. 
Marchandyse, s. barter, I 777. 
Marchant, s. merchant, A 270. 
Marcial, adj. warlike, T. iv. 1669. 
Marcien, adj. devoted to Mars, D 610. 
Mareys, s. marsh, D 970; Mareys, pi. 

marshes, B 2. p 7. 42. 
Marie, interj. marry, i. e. by St. Mary, G 

1062. 
Mark {\),s. mark, fixed spot, L. 784 ; sex, 

race, D 696; sign, I 98. 
Mark (2), s. a piece of money, of the 

value of 13-f. Ofd. in England, G 1026; //. 

Mark, C 390. 
Market-beter, s. swaggerer in a market, 

A 3936. 
Markis, s.2l marquis, E 64; gen. sing, 

marquis's, E 994. 
Markisesse, s. a marchioness, E 283. 
Marty re, s. martyrdom, T. iv. 818. 
Martyreth, pr. s. torments, A 1562. 
Mary, s. marrow, pith, C 542. 
Mary-bones, s.pl. marrow-bones, A 380. 
Mase, s. maze, labyrinth, L. 2014; be- 
wilderment, -T. V. 468 ; bewildering p>osi- 

tion, B 4283. 
Mased, adj. bewildered, B 526; stunned 

with grief, 7. 322. 
Masednesse, s. amaze, E 1061. 
Maselyn, s. a bowl made of maplewood, 

B 2042. 
Massedayes, pi. massdays, B 4041. 
Masse-peny, s. penny for a mass, D 1749. 
Mast, s. mast, i. e. the fruit of forest- 
trees, acorns and beech-nuts, 9. 7, 37. 
Masty, adj. fattened, sluggish, HF. 1777. 

Lit. ' fattened on mast." 
Mat, adj. dejected, A 955; exhausted, T. 

iv. 342; dead, L. 126; defeated utterly, 

B 935- 

Mate, interj. checkmate! 3. 660; adj, 
exhausted, 7. 176. 

Materes, //. materials (of a solid char- 
acter), G 779. 

Matrimoine, s. matrimony, A 3095, E 

1573- 
Maugre, Maugree, in spite of; as in 
?naugre al thy might, A 1607 ; maugree 
hir eyeti two, A 1796 ; maugree thyne yen, 
D 315 ; m. her, L. 1772 ; w. Philistiens, B 
3238 ; m. my heed, in spite of all I can 
do, 3. 1201 ; m. thyn heed, B 104 ; m. his 
heed, A 1169; m. her {hir) heed, L. 2326, 



(^lossarial Entiex. 



69 



D 887; 711. your heed, in spite of all you 

can do, B 4602. 
Maumet. s. idol, I 860. 
Maumetrye, s. Mahometanism, idolatry, 

B 236. Maumet is a corruption of 

Mahomet or Muhammed; our ancestors 

wrongly held the Mahometans to be 

idolaters. 
Maunciple, s. manciple, A 544. An 

officer who purchases victuals for an 

inn or college. 
Mavis, s. song-thrush, R. 619. 
Mawe, s. maw, stomach, B 486. 
May, J-. maiden, B 851. 
Mayde child, girl, B 1285. 
Maydenheed, s. maidenhood, virginity, 

D 888. 
Mayle, s. mail-armour, T. v. 1559. 
Mayntene, v. maintain, R. 1144 ; uphold, 

A 1778. 
Mayster-hunte, s. chief huntsman, 3. 

375- 
Maystres, s. pi. masters, B 3. m 2. 12. 
Maystrie, s. masterly act ; No maystrie, 

an easy matter, L. 400. 
Maze, 7. pr.pl, are in a state of bewilder- 
ment, E 2387. 
Mechel, adj. much ; for as mechel, for as 

much, A. pr. 6. 
Mede (i), s. mead (drink), B 2042. See 

Meeth. 
Mede, s. (2), mead, meadow, A 89. 
Medeleth,/;-. s. mingles, L. 874. 
Medeling-, s. admixture, B i. p 4. 279. 
Medewe, s. meadow, R. 128. 
Mediatours, s. pi. go-betweens, I 967. 
Medle, v. mingle, HF. 2102 ; meddle, take 

part in, G 1184; dye {^niscere), B 2. m 5. 

10; Medly, v. mingle, mix, B 2. m 5. 7; 

imp.pl. meddle, G 1424. 
Mediae, adj. of a mixed colour, A 328. 
Meed, s. reward, L. 1662 ; Mede, meed, 

reward, A 770 ; to medes, for my meed, 

for my reward, T. ii. 1201. 
Meel-tyd, s. meal-time, T. ii. 1556. 
Meeth, s. mead, A 3261, 3378 ; Meth, A 

2279. 
Megre, adj. thin, R. 218, 311. 
Meinee ; see Meynee. 
Meke, i pr. s. humble, B 2874. 
Meke, adv. meekly, 7. 267. 
Melancolious {accented melanc61ious), 

adj. melancholy, HF. 30. 
Meldncolye, s. melancholy, 3. 23. 
Mele, s. meal (of flour), A 3995. 
Melle, s. mill, A 3923, 4242. 
Melte, V. melt, T. iv. 367 ; Malt, pt. s. 

HF. 922; Molte,//. HF\ 1145, 1149- 



Memorial, adj. which serves to record 
events, 7. 18. 

Mein6rie, s. memory, G 339 ; remem- 
brance, A 3112, B 3164. 

Men, pi. ^/"Man ; also a weakened form of 
Man, in the sense of ' one,' or ' some 
one ■ ; used with a singular verb. See 
Man, 

Mendinants, //. mendicant friars, D 
1907, 1912. 

Mene, adj. middle, B 3. m 9. 28; mene 
whyle, mean while, G 1262; of middle 
size, T. V, 806; Mene, adj. pi. inter- 
mediate, 7. 286. 

Mene, s. means, way, 11. 36; middle 
course, T. i. 689; instrument, E 1671 ; 
mediator, i. 125; go-between, T. iii. 254; 
intermediary, I 990; the mean, L. 165; 
pi. means, instruments, D 1484. 

Meneliche, adj. moderate, B i. p 6. iii. 

Menen,^<?r. to say, HF. 1104; to signify, 
B 3941 ; ipr. s. intend, A 793 ; Menestow, 
meanest thou, G 309 ; Mente, i //. s. 
meant, intended, B 4614; purposed, 18. 
50; declared, 7. 160; Ment,//. intended, 
5- 158. 

Mene-whyle, mean time, D 1445. 

Mening-. s. intent, F 151. 

Menivere, s. miniver, a fine fur, R. 227. 

Menstralcies, //. minstrelsies, HF, 1217. 

Mente, pt. t. of Menen, 

Mentes,//. plants of mint, R. 731. 

Mercenarie, s. hireling, A 514. 

Merciable, adj. merciful, B 1878, 3013. 

Mercy, j'. i. 7 ; (have) mercy, i. 36 ; graunt 

,- fjiercy, much thanks, 10. 29. 

Mere, s. mare, A 541 ; Mare, A 4055. 

Meridian, adj. at the moment of south- 
ing, southern, A. pr. 93. 

Meridie, s. midday. A, ii. 44. 48. 

Meridional, adj. southern, F 263. 

Merier, adj. pleasanter, sweeter, B 2024, 
4041. 

Meritorie, adj. meritorious, I 831. 

Merk, s. image, F 880. 

Merken, v. brand, B i. p 4. 139. 

Merlion, s. merlin, small hawk, 5. 339. 

Mermaydens, sirens, R. 680, 682. 

Mersshy, adj. marshy, D 1710. 

Merveille, s. marvel, B 2736. 

Merveillous, adj. marvellous, B 1643. 

Mery, adj. merry, gay, R. 580; pleasant, 
A 235, 757; pleasant to hear, B 1186; 
Meriemen, followers, B 2029. 

Mes ; at good mes, at a favourable distance, 
so as to have a fair shot, R. 1453. O. F. 
mes. 

Meschaunce, s. misfortune, A 2009 ; evil 



70 



(^lossarial Kntiex. 



occurrence, T. i. 92 ; a miserable con- 
dition, B 3204 ; unfortunate conduct, C 
80; ill luck, B 4623; ill luck (to him), 
B 896; with m., with a mischief, H 

193- 
Meschief, s. misfortune, A 493, B 3513; 

trouble, mishap, A 2551 ; tribulation, H 

76. 
Mesel, s. leper, I 624. O. F. tnesel. 
Meselrie, s. leprosy, I 625. 
Message, s. (i), message, T. iii. 401; 

errand, B 1087; (2) messenger, B 144, 

333- 
Messag-er, s. messenger, A 1491. 
Messagerye, s. a sending of messages 

(personified), 5. 228. 
Messang-er, s. messenger, HF. 1568, 
Messe, s. mass, B 1413. 
Messuage, s. dwelling-house, A 3979. 
Meste, //. most, i. e. highest in rank, 

greatest, E 131 ; at the 7n., at most, T. v. 

947- 

Mester, s. service, office, occupation, A 
1340. O. F. 7)1 ester ; Lat. ministerium. 

Mesurable, r?^'. moderate, A 435 ; modest, 
I 936. 

Mesurably, adv. moderately, B 2795. 

Mesure, s. moderation, 3. 881 ; measure, 
E 256 ; plan, 5. 305 ; by in,, not too much, 
3. 872 ; moderately, R. 543 ; over m., 
immeasurably, 5. 300; out of m., im- 
moderately, B 2607 ; withoute m., beyond 
measure, 3. 632. 

Mesuring, s. measure, R. 1349. 

Met, s. measure of capacity, I 799. 

Metaniorphoseos,^^«. s. (the book) of 
Metamorphosis ; it should be pi. Meta- 
morphoseon ; B 93. 

Mete, adj. meet, befitting, 3. 316; fit, L. 
1043 ; pi. meet, A 2291. 

Mete, s. equal, 3. 486. 

Mete, s. meat, food, A 136, 1900; meat, 
L. 1 108; repast, T, ii. 1462; eating, A 
127. 

Mete, V. meet, L. 148 ; find, 5. 698 ; to 
meet together, B 1873; Meteth, pr. s. 
meets (7nen being singular = c«^) , A 
1524; Mette, pt.p/. met, E 390; Metten, 
pt.pl. HF. 227; wel met, D 1443. 

Mete, V. dream, T. iii, 1559, iv. 1396, v. 249 ; 
Met, pr. s. 5. 104, 105 ; Mette, i pt. s. 5. 
95 ; Me mette, i //. s. refi. I dreamt, R. 
26 ; pt. s. impers. 3, 276 ; Met,//. B 4445. 

Mete, \pr. s. (I) measure, A. ii. 41. 8. 

Metely, adj. well-proportioned, R. 822. 

Meth, s. mead (drink), A 2279. 

Meting (i), s. meeting, L. 784. 

Meting (2), s. dream, 3. 282. 



Meve, V. move, stir, T. i. 472; to him 
nieved, urged against him, L. 344. 

Mewe, 5. mew, i. e. coop wherein fowls 
were fattened, A 349; properly, a coop 
for hawks when moulting, F 643 ; 
hiding-place, T. iii. 602. 

Me wet, adj. mute, T. v. 194. 

Mexcuse,ybr Me excuse, excuse myself, 
16. 36. 

Meynee, s. household, B 1238 ; company, 
R. 1305 ; followers, suite, retinue, re- 
tainers, household-servants, R. 615,634; 
household, menials, A 1258 ; army, troop, 
B 3532; assembly, HF. 933; Meinee, 
retinue, I 437 ; troop, A 4381 ; Meiny, 
crew, L. 2201. O. F. meisnee, maisnee, 
household. 

Meyntenaunce, s. demeanour, 3. 834. 

Michel, adj. much, A. ii. 23. 30. 

Mid, adj. middle, 3. 660. 

Middel, s. waist, R. 1032. 

Midel, adj. neither tall nor short, 7. 79. 

Mikel, adj. great, 7. 99; much, L. 1175. 

Mile-wey, s. a space of 5°, which answers 
to twenty minutes of time, the average 
time for walking a mile ; hence the 
term, A. i. 7. 11. 

Milksop, 5. a piece of bread sopped in 
milk; hence, a weak, effeminate man, 
B 3100. 

Milne-stones, pi. mill-stones, T. ii. 1384. 

Minde, s. remembrance, T. ii. 602; 
memory, B 527 ; in m., in remembrance, 
F 109, 607. 

Ministres, pi. officers, B 4233. 

Ministreth, pr. s. administers, governs, 
B 3. m 6. 3. 

Minne, nnp. s. remember, mention, 16.48. 

Minstralcye, s. minstrelsy, E 1718; 
musical instrument, H 113; sound of 
music, F 268. 

Mintinge,//-^^.//, intending, B i. m 2. 3. 

Mirdcle, s. wonder, A 2675 ; legend, B 
1881 ; pleyes of m., miracle-plays, D 558. 

Mirour, s. mirror, R. 567, 1585. 

Mirre, s. myrrh, A 2938. 

Mirthe, s. pleasure, amusement, R. 601 ; 
Mirthe, Sir Mirth (personified), R. 733. 

Mirtheles, adj. sad, 5. 592. 

Mis, adj. wrong, amiss, T. iv. 1348 ; bad, 
HF. 1975 ; blameworthy, G 999. 

Mis, -f. wrong, evil, L. 266 a. 

Mis, adv. amiss, wrongly, T. i. 934. 

Mis, I pr. s. lack, have not, 6. 47. 

Misacounted, pp. miscounted, T. v. 
1185. 

Misaunter, s. misadventure, misfortune, 
T. 766. 



(glossarial intiex. 



Misaventure, s. misadventure, mishap, 

B 6i6 ; mischief, R. 422. 
Misavyse,//-.//. re/i. act unadvisedly, D 

230. 
Misbileve, s. suspicion, G 1213. 
Misbileved, infidels, i. 146, 
Misboden, pp. offered (to do you) evil, 

insulted, A 909. 
Misborn, //. misbehaved, B 3067 (lit. 

' borne amiss'). 
Miscarie, v. go amiss, A 513. 
Mischaunce, s. ill luck, R. 1548 ; mis- 
chance, R. 251; misfortune, L, 1826; /o 

tnischaunce, i. e. to the devil, T. ii. 222, 

V. 359; hoiv 7n., how the mischief, T. iv. 

1362. 
Misclaeef , s, misfortune, L. 1278 ; danger, 

4. 58 ; harm, R. 253. 
Misconceyveth, pr. s. misunderstands, 

E 2410. 
Miscounting-, s. fraudulent reckoning, R, 

196. 
Misdemeth, pr. s. misjudges, E 2410. 
Misdeparteth, pr. s. parts or divides 

amiss, B 107. 
Misdooth, pr. s. ill-treats, B 3112. 
Misdrawing-es, s. pi. way of drawing 

aside, B 3. p 12. 107. 
Misericorde, s. (there is) mercy, pity, T. 

lii. 1 177 ; pity, B 2608. 
Mis6rie, s. misery, B 3167. 
Misese, s. trouble, I 806; discomfort, 

I 177 ; pi. injuries, B i. p 4. 73. 
Misesed, pp. vexed, I 806. 
Misfille,//. s. subj. it went amiss (with), 

A 2388. 
Misforyaf , pf. s. misgave, T. iv. 1426. 
Misg-oon,//. gone astray, I 80. 
Misgovernaunce, s. misconduct, B3202. 
Misgyed, pp. misconducted, B 3723. 
Mishap, s. ill luck, B 3435. 
Mishappe, v. meet with misfortune, B 

2886 ; pr. s. subj. (it) may happen ill for, 

A 1646. 
Mishappy, adj. unhappy, B 2758. 
Miskncwinge, j. ignorance, B 3. m 11. 27. 
Mislay, //. s. lay in an uncomfortable 

position, A 3647. 
Misledden, ;z5/,/i/. misconducted, T. iv. 48. 
Misledinges, pi. misguiding ways, B 3. 

p 8. 2. 
Mislyketh, pr. s. displeases, L. 1293, 
Mislyved, pp. of ill life, treacherous, T. 

iv. 330. 
Mismetre, pr. s. subj. scan amiss, T. v. 

1796. 
Mis-sat, pi. s. was not where it should 

be, 3. 941 ; misbecame, R. 1194. 



Misse, V. fail, D 1416; draw to an end, 5.. 

40; pi. s. was wanting (to), T, iii. 445; 

pp. missing, T. iii. 537. 
Mis-set, pp. misplaced, 3. 1210. 
Misseye, ipr. s. speak amiss, 7. 317 ; pr. s. 

slanders, I 379; mlssayd or do, said or 

done wrong, 3. 528. 
Misspeke, 1 pr. s. subj. speak wrongly, A 

3139- 

Mistaketh, 2 pr. pi. transgress, trespass,. 
R. 1540. 

Mister, .f. trade, handicraft, occupation, 
A 613; need, R. 1426; Mester, occupa- 
tion, A 1340 ; what m. men, men of what 
occupation, what sort of men, A 1710, 
See Mester. 

Misterye, s. ministry, profession, I 895.. 
From Lat. mlnisterium. 

Mistihede, s. mystery, 4. 224, 

Mis-torneth, pr. pi. turn aside, B 3. 

P3-9- 
Mistyde, v. be unlucky, B 2886. 
Miswanderinge, adj. straying (Lat, 

denius), B 3. p 2. 27. 
Miswent, //. gone amiss, T. i. 633. 
Mis-weyes, s. pi. by-paths, B 3. m 11. 3.. 
Miteyn, s. mitten, glove, C 372. 
Mixen, s. dunghill, I 911. 
Mo (moo), a^'. more, A. pr. 27 ; more (in 

number), A 576, 849; besides, L. 917; 

others, E 2113; another, E 1039 ; (others) 

besides, E 2263; many others besides, 

D 663 ; tyjues ino, at other times, E 449; 

othere mo, others besides, G looi ; 7ia mo,. 

no more, none else, B 695. 
'M.o,adv. more, any longer, D 864; never 

the mo, fiever tno, never, D 691, 1099. 
Mochel, adj. great, L. 1966; much, G 611. 
Mochel, adv. much, B 3959. 
Mochel, s. size, 3. 454, 861. 
Moder, s. mother, B 276; the thickest 

plate forming the principal part of the 

astrolabe (Lat. mater or rotula), A. i. 3. 

I ; Modres, gen. B 1783 ; Modres, pL- 

C93- 
Moeble, adj. moveable, A. i. 21. 80. 
Moeble, s. moveable goods, personal 

property, T. iv. 1380, 1460 ; //. G 540. 
Moedes, s.pl. moods, strains (of music),. 

B 2. p I. 50. 
Moevable, adj. fickle, B 4. m 5. 32 ; as s. 

The firste m., the ' primum mobile,' A. i. 

17. 50. 
Moevabletee, s. mobility, B 4. p 6. 126. 
Moeve,^^^. to stir up, B 2218; v. move,. 

I 133- 
Moevere, s. mover, A 2987. 
Moevinge, s. moving, motion, A. pr. 99;^. 



72 



(^lossavial Entiex. 



Firste moeving, the ' primum mobile,' 
A. i. 17. 45. 

Moiste, pi. supple, A 457. 

Moiste, adj. as s. moisture, R. 1564. 

Mokereres, s.pl. misers, B 2. p 5. 18. 

Mokre, v. hoard up, T. iii. 1375. 

Molestie, s. trouble, B 3. p 9. 105. 

Molliflcacioun, s. softening, G 854. 

Molte,//. ; see Melte. 

Monche, v. munch, T. i. 914. 

Mone, s. moon, A 2077; i. e. position or 
'quarter' of the moon, A 403; Mone, 
gen. B 2070; Mones, ^^//, F 1154. 

Mone, s. moan, complaint, A 1366, F 920. 

Mone, V. reji. to lament, T. i. 98. 

Monstre, s. prodigy, F 1344; pi. B3302. 

Montaig-ne, s. mountain, B 24. 

Mood, s. anger, A 1760; thought, C 126. 

Moon, s. moan, lamentation, complaint, 
L. 1 169, 1799. 

Moorne, i/r. s. mourn, A 3704. 

Moorning-e, s. mourning, plaint, A 3706. 

Moot, s. fil. notes on a horn, 3. 376. 

Moot, ipr. s. must, shall, B 1853; pr. s. 
must, ought to, A 232 ; is to (go) , B 294 ; 
Mot, I pr. s. may, 4. 267 ; must, have 
to, B 227; Most, 2 pr, s. B 104; Mot, 
pr. s. must, has to, L. 388, 1945 ; Mote, 
2pr. pi. may, T. ii. 402; Moten, must, 
L. 343 ; Mote {or Mooi),pr. s. subj. may, 
HF. 102; L. 843; is sure to, L. 1632; 
Moot {or Mote) I goon, may I still go, 
may I still retain the power to walk, 
^ 777 \ So moot {or mote) I thee, as 
I may thrive, as I hope to thrive, C 
309; As ever mote I, A 832; Foule 
moot thee falle, ill may it befall thee, 
H 40; Moot {or Mote) thou, mayst thou, 
B 1626; Moste, 1 pt. s.m\\'=y\. (go), B282; 
Moste, pt. s. must, 4. 250; had to, B 
886; ought to (be), F 38; was made to, 
B 3700; Mosten, pt. pi. should, L. 99; 
Moste, pt. s. subj. might, L. 1573 ; tis 
7noste, we must resolve to, G 946. 

Moral, adj. excellent in character, T. iv. 
1672. 

Moralitee, s. moral tale, I 38; moral 
writing, I 1088. 

Mordre, s. murder, R. 1136; m. wol out, 
B 4242. 

Mordre, ^^;-. to murder, kill, L. 1536. 

Mordrer, s. murderer, 5. 353, 612. 

Mordring-, s. murdering, A 2001. 

More, adj. greater, B 2396, E 1231 ; larger, 
HF. 500; More and lesse, all alike, 
every one, B 959 ; More and more, HF. 
532; with-outen more, without further 
trouble, T. iv. 133. 



More, adv. more, A 219; in a greater 
degree, B 3745. 

More, s. root, T. v. 25. A. S. moru. 

Mormal, s. sore, gangrene, A 386. 

Morne, s. morning; morne milk, raoxmVig- 
milk, A 358, 3236. 

Morsel, s. morsel, bit, A 128; m. breed, 
morsel of bread, B 3624. 

Morter, s. mortar, 9. 15 ; a metal bowl for 
holding wax, with a wick for burning, 
T. iv. 1245. 

Mortifye, v. kill ; used of producing 
change by chemical action, G 1431; 
pp. deadened, I 233. 

Mortreux, pi. thickened soups or pot- 
tages, A 384. (Also spelt inortrewes ; 
thus X is for s.) 

Morwen, s. morning, morrow, T. ii. 1555 ; 
Morwe, L. 49, 108 ; fore part of a day, 
T. iv. 1308 ; by the morwe, early in the 
morning, A 334. 

Morwening'e, s. morning, A 1062 ; dawn- 
ing, 4. 26. 

Morwe-song-, s. morning-song, A 830. 

Morwe-tyde, s. morning-hour, E 2225; 
/// the ;;/., in the morning, B 4206. 

Mosel, s. muzzle, A 2151. 

Most, 2 pt. s. oughtest (to), 8. 3; Moste, 
//. s. must, ought (to), A 3088; must 
(go), HF. 187; had to go, T. v. 5; was 
obliged to, T. iii. 540; must, might, E 
2102 ; pt. s. subj. might, L. 1594 ; Mosten 
pt. pi. must, might, T. ii. 1507 ; could 
HF. 2094. 

Moste, adj. sup. greatest, F 199; chief, 
D 1041 ; chiefest, F 361. 

Mote {\),s. atom, T. iii. 1603; Motes,//, 
specks of dust, D 868. 

Mote (2), s. motion (Lat. motus), A. ii. 44 
22. i'he ' mene mote' ox mean motion 
is the average motion of a planet dur- 
ing a given period. 

Motre . ,.f ^/-. to mutter, T. ii. 541, 

Mottelee, s. motley array, A 271. 

Motthes, s.pl. moths, B 2187. 

Motyf, s. motive; hence idea, notion, B 
628, E 1491. 

Motilen, V. grow mouldy, B 32; //. A 
3870. 

Mountance, s. amount, value, quantity, 
A 1570; amount (of time), L. 307; length, 
T. ii. 1707; value, H 255. 

Mourdaunt, s. chape, or metal tag, at 
the end of a girdle, R. 1094. (Not ' the 
tongue of a buckle.') 

Moustre, s. pattern, 3. 912. 

Moveresse, s. a fomentress of quarrels, 
R. 149. 



(glossarial Kntjei. 



73 



Mowe, s. grimace, T. iv. 7 ; p/. HF. 1806. 

Mowen, v. be able ; mowen sheiveii, be- 
come evident, B 5. p 4. 163; Mowen, ^^<f;-. 
to have power, T. ii. 1594; May, \pr. s. 
may, B 89; can, B 231; Maystovv, may- 
est tliou, A 1918; Mowe, i pr. pi. can, 
B 2939; may, HF. 1735; Mowen, 2 /r. 
pi. can, 19. 25 ; Mowe, 2 pr. pi. may, L. 
92; can, 3. 552; Mowen, pr. pi. are 
able to, D 1722; Mowe, pr. pi. may, 
can, A 2999 ; Mowe, "zpr. s. suhj. mayest, 
G 460 ; Mighte, pt. s. might, A 169, &c. ; 
I pt. s. subj. could, E 638. 

Mowing-e, s. ability, B 4. p 4. 32. 

Mowled, pp. decayed, A 3870. 

Moysoun, s. crop, growth, R. 1677. O. F. 
motson ; Lat. ace. mensionem. 

Moyste, adj. fiesh, new, B 1954, C 315. 

Moysty, adj. new (applied to ale), H 60. 
A Muable, adj. changeable, T. iii. 822. 

Muchel, adj. much, great, A 2352; a 
great deal of, F 349; in so ;/?., in so 
much, B 2644; many, G 673. 

Muchel, adv. greatly, A 258; much, F 
1129. 

Mulier est hominis confusio, woman is 
man's confusion, B 4354. 

Mullok, J-. a heap of refuse, A 3873; con- 
fused heap of materials, G 938, 940. 

Multiplicacioun, s. multiplying, i. e. 
the art of alchemy, G 849. 

Multiplye, v. to make gold and silver by 
the arts of alchemy, G 669. 

Murmuracion, s. murmuring, I 499. 

Murmuring-e, s. murmur, A 2432. 

Murthe, s. mirth, joy, E 1123. 

Murye, adj. merry, A 1386. 

Muscle, s. mussel, D 2100. 

Muse, s. muse, poetic faculty, 16. 38. 

Muse, ,f(fr. to consider, T. iii. 563 ; pr. s. 
gazes into, R. 1592; f>p. gazed, R. 1645. 

Musice, Music, B 2. p i. 49. 

Musyke, music, 5. 62; Musik, B 4483. 

Muwe, s. mew, pen (for hawks), cage, 
T. i. 381; in minve, cooped up, T. iv. 
496, 

Muwe, V. change, T. ii. 1258. 

Myle, s. mile, HF. 1038; fyve ;«., five 
miles, G 555. 

Mynde, s. dat. mind, recollection, 3. 15; 
ace. reason, 2. 34; 3. 511; have minde 
upon, remember, 19. 26. 

Myne, v. undermine, T. iii. 767. 

Mynour, s. one who mines, A 2465. 

Myrie, adj. merry, A 1499. 

Myrie. adv. merrily, A 3575. 

Myrier. adv. comp. merrier, R. 876. 

Mys, pi. mice, B 2. p 6. 37. 



Myte (i), s. mite, thing of no value, A 

1558. 
Myte (2), mite, insect; pi. D 560. 

N. 

N', for ne, not; as in nachcveth for ne 

acheveth, and the like. 
Na, no (Northern), A 4175. 
Na mo, i. e. no more, none else, B 695. 
Nacheveth, for ne acheveth, achieves 

not, T. V. 784. 
Nadde,//. s. {for ne hadde), had not, R. 

457- 
Naddre, s. adder, E 1786. 
Nadir, s. the point of the ecliptic exactly 

opposite to that in which the sun is 

situate, A. ii. 6. i ; see 1. 12. 
Nadstow, 2. pt. s. haddest thou not, didst 

thou not, A 4088. 
Naille, imp. s. 3 /. let it nail, let it fasten, 

E 1184. 
Naiteth, pr. s. refuses, B i. m i, 25. 
Nake, 2 pr.pl. make naked, B 4. ni 7. 70; 

Naked, pp. as adj. naked, A 1956, 1 105 ; 

bare, HF. 133 ; destitute, void, weak, 

G 486 ; simple, plain, A. pr. 30. 
Nakers, />/. kettle-drums, A 2511. From 

the Arabic. 
Nale ; atte Jiale, at the ale, at the ale- 
house, D 1349. 
Nam, {for ne am), i pr. s. am not, A 

1122, B 2710; nam but deed, am only a 

dead man, 3. 204. 
Nam, pt. s. took, G 1297. 
Name, s. good name, reputation, L. 1812; 

title, B 3. p 6. 36. 
Namiely, adv. especially, A 1268, 2709. 
Namo, {for na mo), no more in number, 

A loi, 544; none other, no one else, 

D 957. 
Namore, adv. no more, A 98. 
Napoplexye, for Ne apoplexye, nor 

apoplexy, B 4031. 
Nappetli. pr. s. naps, slumbers, nods, 

H9. 
Narette; see Arette. 
Nart, ( for ne art), art not, G 499. 
Narwe. adj. small, B 4012; pi. A 625; 

close, closely drawn, D 1803. 
Narwe. adv. narrowly, closely, A 3224; 

tightly, L. 600; carefully, E 1988, 
Nas, {for ne was), was not, A 251, 288; 

/ nas but, I was simply, 2. 21. 
Nassayeth, for ne assayeth, attempts 

not, T. V. 784. 
Nat, adv. not, A 74; Nat but, only, 

merely, L. 1899 ; quite, L. 2091. 
Nat, ( for ne at), nor at, B 290. 



D 2 



74 



#los0arial Untiex. 



Nat forthy, adv. notwithstanding, B 2165. 
Natal, adj. who presides over nativities, 

T. iii. 150. 
Nath, (^for ne hath), pr. s. hath not, A 

923- 

Nathelees, nevertheless, A 35. 

Nature, s. nature, A 11; kind, race, 5. 
615 ; seed, I 577. 

Naturel, adj. natural, A 416. A ' day 
natural ' is a period of 24 hours. 

Naug-ht, adv. not, B 1701 ; not so, G 269. 

Nave, s. nave (of a wheel), D 2266. 

Naxe, ( for ne axe), ask not, T. v. 594. 

Nay, adv. nay, no, G 1339; {opposed to 
yea) , E 355 ; (answers a direct question) , 
B 740 ; surely not ! 3. 1309 ; as s. nay, 
untruth, 3. 147; It is no nay, there is 
no denying it, B 1956. 

Nayte, v. withhold, deny, I 1013, 

Ne, adv. and conj. not, A 70; nor, A 179, 
526; 7ie . . . ne, neither . . . nor, A 603; 
(when used with a verb, a second neg- 
ative is often added). 

Nece, s. niece, B 1290. 

Necesseden, pt. pi. compelled, B 3. m 
9.8. 

Neddre, s. adder; pi. L. 699, 

Nede, s. need, extremity, B 102, 658, 
2360; extremity, ditificult matter, B 
2917; peril, B 3576; at nede, at need, 
I. 112; for nede, if needful, R. 1123; 
s. as adj. needful, A 304; //. matters of 
business, B 174, 1266; necessities, T. ii. 
954 ; needs, G 178 ; for nedes, for very 
need, 3, 1201. 

Nede, adv. necessarily, of necessity, R. 
144 1, 1473. 

Nede, v. be necessary, B 871 ; Nedeth, 
pr. s. (it) is necessary, (it) needs, A 462; 
what n., what is the need of, A 849 ; 
Nedede, pt. s. impers. (there) needed, A 
4020, 4161 ; us neded, we should need, 
T. iv. 1344. 

Nedely, adv. of necessity, necessarily, 

B 4435- 
Nedes, adv. needs, necessarily, of neces- 

sitv, L. 1298. 
Nedes-cost, adv. of necessity, A 1477, 

1.. 2697. 
Needly. adv. necessarily, B 3. p 9. 87. 

See Nedely. 
Neen, no (Northern), A 4185, 4187. 
Near, adv. comp. nearer, A 839, 968 ; neer 

and neer, A 4304 ; as pos. adv. near, A 

1439 ; fer or neer, far or near, T. i. 451. 
Neet, pi. neat, cattle, A 597, 
Negardye, s. niggardliness, 10. 53. 
Neg-hen, v. draw nigh, L. 318. 



Neigh, adj. near, nigh, B 2558. 
Neig-h, adv. nearly, T, i, 60. 
Neighebour, s. neighbour, A 535. 
Neighen, v. draw near, T. ii. 1555. 
Neither nother, (in) neither the one 

nor the other, B 5. m 3. 53. 
Nekke-boon, s. neck-bone, B 1839 ; neck, 

D 906 ; nape of the neck, B 669. 
Nel, 1 pr. s. will not, 1". ii. 726. 
Nempnen, v. name, B 507. 
Nenvye, ifor ne envye, imp. s. envy not, 

T. V. 1789. 
Ner, adv. cofnp. nearer, 3. 888 ; T. i. 448 ; 

Nere, 3. 38 ; ner and ner, B 1710 ; Ner 

the les, nevertheless, 4. 130. 
Nercotikes, pi. narcotics, A 1472, 
Nere {for ne were) , 2 //. s. wast not, 4. 

112; pt. pi. were not, A 875, D 1944; 

ipt. s. siibj. should not (I) be, T. ii. 409 ; 

Nere, pt. s. suhj. would not be, should » 

not be, A 1129; were not, B 3984; were 

it not, B 132; were it not (for), i, 24, 

180. 
Nere, adv. nearer, R. 1454. 
Nerf, s. nerve, i. e. sinew, T. ii. 642, 
Nescapest {for Ne escapest), escapest 

not, L. 2643. 
Nest, s. D 1691 ; wikked nest, i. e. mau tii, 

or Mauny (referring to Sir Oliver 

Mauny), B 3573; pi. HF. 1516. 
Net-herdes, gen. neat-herd's, B 2746. 
Nether, adj. lower, A 3852. 
Netherest, adj. superl. lowest, i. e. outer- 
most, A. i. 18. 7. 
Nevene, v. name, G 821 ; herd hir name 

n., heard (him) name her name, T. 

i. 876; pr. pi. siibj. may mention, G 

1473- 
Never, adv. never, A 70 ; n. dide but, 

never did aught that was not, 4. 297 ; 

;;. the neer, none the nearer, G 721. 
Neveradel, adv. not a bit, C 670. 
Never-mo, adv. never oftener, never 

(with two exceptions), A. ii. 31. 5 ; never, 

3- I 125. 
Nevew, s. nephew, L. 1442; grandson, 

L. 2659. 
Newe, adv. newly, freshly, afresh, A 365, 

428 ; of newe, new, fresh, T. ii. 20 ; Newe 

and newe, again and again, T. iii. 116; 

continually, C 929. 
Newed, //. s. had something fresh in it, 

3. 906; pp. renewed, B 3036. 
Newefangel, adj. fond of novelty, F 618, 

H193. 

New-fangelnesse, s. fondness for nov- 
elty, L. 154 ; F 610. 

Newe-thought, s. Inconstancy, R. 982. 



(glossarial Entja. 



75 



Nexte, adj. sup. nearest, A 1413 ; easiest, 

T. i. 697. 
Ney, adj. nigh, A. ii. 3. 78. 
Nig-ard, adj. niggardly, R. 1172. 
Nig-ard, s. miser, niggard, B 4105. 
Nig-ardye, s. miserliness, B 1362. 
Nig-tite, ger. to grow dark, become night, 

T. V. 515. 
Nig'hter-tale, s. ; by n., in the night-time, 

A 97. This expression seems to have 

resulted from a confusion of Icel, a 

nattar-peli, in the dead of night, with 

Icel. nattar-tal, a tale or number of 

nights. 
Nig'ht-spel, s. night-spell, night-incan- 
tation, A 3480. 
NigTomanciens, s. pi. necromancers, 

I 603. 
Nil, I pr. s. will not, 3. 92, 1125; will (I) 

not, shall (I) not, T. v. 40, 43, 44; desire 

not, dislike, E 646; Nille, i pr. s. will 

not, G 1463; Ni],pr. s. will not, B 972; 

will not (have), 3. 586; will (she) not, 

3. 1140; Nilt, 2/>/-. ^. wilt not, T. ii. 1024; 

Niltow, thou wilt not, T. i. 792. 
Nilling-e, s. refusing, B 5. p 2. 23. 
Nin, /or Ne in, nor in, E 1511, F 35. 
Nis, for ne is, is not, 2. 77 ; Ther nis no 

more but, all that remains is that, L. 

847. 
Niste, I //. s. knew not, F 502; pL s. 

knew not, A 3414, 4225. 
Noble, s. a gold coin, A 3256; //. HF. 

1315. (Worth 6s. 8d.) 
Nobledest, />/. s. 2 /. ennobledest, didst 

ennoble, G 40. A translation of Dante's 

nobilitasti. 
Noblesse, s. nobleness, R. 780; noble 

cheer, T. v. 439; nobility, D 1167; (title 

of respect), B 2956; magnificence, B 

3438 ; high honour, B 3208 ; nobility, 

rank, R. 1034; worthy behaviour, B 

185, 248. 
Nobley, s. nobility, dignity, splendour, 

HF. 1416; noble rank, T. iv. 1670; 

assembly of nobles, G 449; state, F 'jj. 
Nof {for Ne of), nor of, D 571, 660. 
Nogrtit, adv. not, A 107 ; by no means, 

in no respect, A 1226; Noght but for, 

only because, D 645. 
Nog-ht, s. nothing, C 542; N. worth, 

worth nothing, H 200. 
Noisen, 2 pr.pl. cry aloud, B 3. m 6. 10. 
Nokked, pp. notched, R. 942. 
Nolde, I pt. s. would not, did not want, 

5. 90; (I) should not desire, G 1334; 

Noldest, 2 //. s. wouldst not, 3. 482 ; 

Noldestow, if thou wouldst not, T. iii. 



1264; Nolde, //. s. would not, i. 31; 

would not (have), A 1024. 
Nombre, s. number, A 716; amount, 

sum, A. ii. 24. 5. 
Nombred, //. counted in, T. iii. 1269. 
Nomen, pp. taken, T. v. 514 ; put, R. 408 ; 

Nome, pp. L. 822, 1018, 1777. Pp. of 

Jtinien. 
Nones, for the, for the nonce, for the 

occasion, for this occasion, A 379, 523, 

545, 879; on the spur of the moment, 

T. i. 561 ; for the time, T. ii. 1381 ; With 

the nones, on the condition, HF. 2099, 

L 1540. Originally for then anes, for 

the once ; where then is the dat. of the 

def. article (A. S. ^am). 
Nonne, s. nun, A 118; Nonnes Freest, 

Xun's Priest, B 4637. 
Nonnerye, s. nunnery, A 3946. 
Noon, none, no, A 318, 449; or noon, or 

not, or no, D 2069. 
Noot, I pr. s. know not, L. 2660; Not, L. 

193 ; Nost, knowest not, 3. 1137 ; Nostow, 

thou knowest not, HF. loio; Noot, pr. s. 

knows not, C 284; Not, 4. 214. A. S. 

ndt. 
Norice, s. nurse, B 4305. 
Norice, v. nourish, foment, B 2204; //. 

brought up, E 399. 
Norissing, s. nutriment, A 437; growth, 

A 3017 ; Norishinge, bringing up, E 

1040 ; //. refections, B 4. p 6. 38 ; 

sustenance, B i. p 6. 93 (hat. /omite/n). 
Noriture, s. nourishment, T. iv. 768. 
Nortelrye, s. education, A 3967. 
Northren, northern, A 1987. 
Nortiire, s. instruction, good manners, 

R. 179. 
Nory, s. pupil (lit. foster-child), B 3. 

p II. 233; Norry, B i. p 3. 14. 
Nose-thirles, //. nostrils, A 557, I 209. 
Noskinnes, /br Noneskinnes, of no kind,. 

HF. 1794. From nones, gen. of noon, 

none ; and kiftnes, gen. of kin. 
Nost, Nostow, Not; see Noot. 
Not but, only, 4. 121 ; T. iii. 1636. 
Nota, i. e. observe, A. ii. 26. 33. 
Notabilitee, s. notable fact, B 4399. 
Notable, adj. notorious, remarkable, B 

1875- 
Notaries, s. pi. scribes, I 797. 
Note, s. (i),note(in music), A 235, B 1737 ; 

musical note, peal, HF. 1720; tune, 5. 

677 ; by n., accordmg to musical notes, 

by note, R. 669; in concord, all at once, 

T. iv. 585. 
Note, J. (2). employment, business, task,. 

job, A 4068. A. S. 7iotu. 



76 



(©lossarial Entex. 



Noteful, adj. useful, A. pr. 120. 

Notemug-e, s. nutmeg, B 1953. 

Notes, s.pl. nuts, R. 1360. 

Not-heed, s. crop-head, a head with hair 
cropped short, A 109. 

Notlier, neither, 7. 253 ; neither (of them), 
L. 192. 

Nothing', adv. in no respect, in no degree, 
not at all, A 2505; for n., by no means, 
D 1121. 

Notificacions, pi. hints, B 5. m 3. 23. 

Notifle, pr. pi. indicate, I 430; //. pro- 
claimed, B 256. 

Nouchis, J. //.jewelled ornaments, jewels 
(properly, setting for jewels), clasps, 
HF. 1350; Nowches, E 382. "E. ouch. 

Noug'ht, adv. not, T. ii. 575, 673 ; not at 
all, 3. 3 ; B 2262. 

Noumbre, s. number, 3. 440. 

Noumbre, v. number, 3, 439 ; pp. counted 
in, T. iii. 1269. 

Noun-certeyn, s. uncertainty, 18. 46; T. 

i- 337- 
Noun-po"wer, s. impotence, B 3. p 5. 22. 
Nouthe, now, T. i. 985; as fwui/ie, at 

present, A 462. 
Novelrye, s. novelty, T. ii. 756. 
Now, adv. now, A 715 ; for now, for the 

present, 7. 343 ; now and 7iow, from time 

to time, occasionally, F 430. 
Nowches ; see Nouchis. 
Noyous, adj. troublesome, HF. 574. Short 

for arioyous. 
Ny, adj. near, B 2562 ; Nye, def. the one 

who is near, A 3392. 
Ny, adv. nigh, nearly, B 2735 ; as ny as, 

as close to, A 588 ; 7vel ny, almost, A 

1330- 
Ny./;v/. nigh, B 550. 
Nyce, adj. foolish, B 3712, 4505 ; ignorant, 

R. 1257; foolish, weak, B 1083, G 493; 

ludicrous, A 3855 ; scrupulous, A 398. 
Nycely, adv. foolishly, T. v. 11^2. 
Nycetee, s. folly, G 463 ; simplicity, A 

4046 ; foolish behaviour, pleasure, D 

412; scrupulousness, T. ii. 1288. 
Nye ; see Ny, 
Nyfles, pi. mockeries, pretences, D 1760. 

Lit. ' sniffings ' ; O. F. nijler, to sniff. 

O. 

O (66) , one, A 304, 363 ; a single, B 5. p 6. 
158; one and the same, T. ii. 37; one 
continuous and uniform, HF. iioo. See 
Oon. 

Obeisant, adj. obedient, E 66, I 264. 

Obeisaunce, s. obedience, E 24, 502 ; 



obedient act, E 230; obedient farewell, 
L. 2479 ; in your 0., in obedience to you, 
2. 84 ; unto her 0., in obedience to her, 
L. 587 ; Obeisaunces, pi. acts of dutiful 
attention, L. 149; observances, L, 1268. 

Obeising-, adj. yielding, L. 1266. 

Objecte, adj. presented, B 5. p 5. 5. 

Obligacioun.j.bond, 15.2; Obligaciouns, 
pi. sureties, B 3018. 

Oblig'e, v.; 0. to you, lay an obligation on 
you (to make me), T. iv. 1414. 

Obsequies, pi. funeral rites, A 993. 

Observaunce.j. respect, A 1045 ; homage, 
7. 218 ; observance, L. 1608 ; ceremony, 
T. ii. 112; heed, I 747; pi. customary 
attentions, F 956; duties, L. 150. 

Observe, v. favour, B 1821 ; pr. s. takes 
heed, I 303. 

Occasioun, s. cause, L. 994. 

Occident, s. west, B 297. 

Occidentale, adj. western, A. i. 5. 9. 

Occupye, v. take up, F 64; pr. s. follows 
close upon, T. iv. 836; dwells in, B 424; 
ifnp. s. hold to, B 4. p 7. 103. 

Octog'amye, s. marrying eight times, D 

33- 

Of, prep, of, A 2, &c. ; by, R. 1260 ; con- 
cerning, about, F 1179; during, B 510; 
for, 13. 19; off, from, 3. 964; on account 
of, B 2208 ; as to, as regards, in respect 
of, F 425; as to, 3. 966; upon, 5. 555; 
over, B 2947 ; with, A 2055 ; some, A 
146; 0/ a purpos, on purpose, deliber- 
ately, B 2273 ; 0/ al f?jy lif, in all my life, 
5. 484 ; of grace, by his favour, out of 
his favour, E 178; fulfild of, filled with, 
7.42. 

Of, adv. off, away, 5. 494 ; (come) off, T. 
iv. 1106; off, A 2676; com of be quick, 
have done, A 3728. 

Offensioun, damage, A 2416. 

Offertorie, s. offertory, A 710. 

Office, s. office, employment of a secular 
character, A 292 ; employment, B' 3446 ; 
duty, 5. 236; property, D 1144; place of 
office, D 1577 ; with 0., by the use of 
(Lat. officio), B i. p 1.3; houses of o., 
servants' offices, E 264. 

Of-newe, adv. newly, again, R. 1613 ; 
lately, E 938. 

Of-shbwve, v. repel (lit. shove off), A 
3912. 

Of-taken, pp. taken away, B 1855. 

Ofte, adj.pl. many; Ofte sythes, often- 
times, A 485; Ofte tyme, often, A 52; 
Tymes ofte, E 226. 

Oft'er, adv. co7np. oftener, E 215. 

Of that. C071J. because, L. 815. 



(§lo0sarial 3IntJ£i. 



77 



Of-thowed,//. thawed away, HF. 1143. 

Ogh-t, s. aught, anything, F 1469; any- 
thing of value, G 1333 ; as adv. ought, 
at all, B 1792. 

Oghte ; see Owen. 

Oke, Okes; see Ook. 

Olifaunts, s.p/. elephants, B 3. p 8. 29. 

Oliveres, s.p/. olive-trees, R. 1314; olive- 
yards, B 3226. 

Olyve. s. olive-tree, 5. 181. 

Omelies, s. p/. homilies, I 1088. 

On, pre/), on, A 12 ; in, F 921 ; at, T. iii. 
32 ; of, T. iii. 18 ; as regards, E 1424 ; 
against. T. ii. 865; towards, 4. 298; 
binding on, 10. 43; Air on, upon her, 3. 
1217; on eve, in the evening, E 1214; on 
reste, at rest, F 379. 

On, one ; see Oon. 

Onde. s. envy, R. 148. A. S. anda. 

Oneden, pt. pi. united, I 193 ; pp. united, 
complete, D 1968. 

Ones. adv. once, B 588 ; united in design, 
C 696 ; at ones, at once, A 765. 

On-lofte, adv. aloft, up in the air, in the 
sky, 5. 203, 683 ; above ground, E 229. 

On-iy ve, adv. alive, F 932. Lit. ' in life.' 

Oo, one ; see Oon. 

Ook, s. oak, A 1702 ; Oke, dat. 3. 447 ; 
{collectively) , oaks, R. 1384. 

Oon, one, R. 624; always the same, the 
same, one and the same, B 2142; united, 
agreed, T. ii. 1740; alone, unwedded, D 
66; the same, i. e. of small consequence, 
3. 1295; the same thing, alike, F 537; 
oofi the faireste, one of the fairest, E 
212 ; in oon, in the same state, un- 
changeably ; ever in oon, ever alike, 
always in the same manner, E 602; 
continually, D 209; ooti and oon, one by 
one, A 679; after oon, equally good, A 
341 ; that oon, one thing, T. iv. 1453 1 
the one, C 666; nia?iy oon, many a one, 
A 317, E 775 ; felle at oon, came to one 
agreement, T. iii. 565 ; jnany on, many 
a one, D 680; everich on, every one, B 
1 164 ; Oo, one, G 207 ; a single, R. 1236 ; 
one and the same, 3. 1293. 

Ooned, pp. united, B 4. p 6. 81, 

Open-ers, s. fruit of the medlar, A 3871. 

Open-heeded, with head uncovered, D 

645- 
Opie. s. opium, A 1472 ; Opies,//. opiates, 

L. 2670. 
Opned.//. opened, T. iii. 469. 
Opposen, v. oppose ; 0. me, lay to my 

charge, D 1597. 
Oppresse, v. suppress, 10. 60; violate, F 

141 1 ; ger. to put down, G 4. 



Oppressioun, s. oppression, wrong, L. 
2592; tyranny, 10. 19; violation, L. 
1868. 

Or, conj. ere, G 314. 

Or, prep, before, R. 864. 

Or, conj. or, A 91, &c. ; Or ... or, either 
... or, R. 261. 

Oratorie, s. closet for prayers, A 1905. 

Ordal, s. ordeal, T. iii. 1046. 

Orde. dat. point, L. 645. A. S. ord. And 
see Word. 

Ordenee, adj. well-ordered, B 4. p i. 46. 

Orden^ly, adv. conformably, in order, 
B 4. p 6. 313. 

Ordenour, s. ruler, B 3. p 12. 102. 

Ordeyned, pp. provided, A 2553 ; ap- 
pointed, F 177 ; prepared, G 1277 ; 
ordered, I 336; (= ordeynee),//. regu- 
lated, T. i. 892. 

Ordinaat. adj. orderly, E 1284. 

Ordinatly, adj. methodically, I 1045. 

Ordinaunce, s. arrangement, A 3012 ; 
provision, B 250; orderly arrangement. 
A 2567 ; consideration, 18. 38 ; order, B 
2303 ; resolve, B 2258 ; command, 10. 

44- 
Ordred, pp. as adj. ordained, I 782. 
Ordure, s. filthiness, I 841; rubbish, T. 

V. 385. 

Ore, s. grace; thyn 0., (I pray for) thy 
grace, A 3726. A. S. ar. 

Ore, J-. ore (of metal), D 1064, A. S. dr. 

Ores, s.pl. oars, L. 2308, 

Orfrays, s. gold embroidery, gold braid, 
fringe with golden threads, R. 462, 869, 
1076. A. F. orfreis, O. F. orfrois. 

Organs, s.pl. ' organs,' the old equivalent 
of organ, G 134. 

Orgon, pi. as sing, organ (Lat. organ a), B 
4041. 

Orient, s. east, A 1494. 

Oriental, adj. eastern ; (hence) of supe- 
rior quality, L. 221. 

Orisonte. j\ horizon, T. v. 276. 

Orisoun, s. prayer, A 2372. 

Orizon rectum, or right horizon, A. ii. 26. 
35. This means the horizon of any 
place situate on the equator, which 
could be represented by a straight line 
UDon a disc of the astrolabe. 

Orloge. s. clock, 5. 350; B 4044. 

Orphelin. adj. orphaned, B 2. p 3. 33. 

Orpiment, s. orpiment, G 759, 774, 823. 
' Orpiment, trisulphide of arsenic ' ; 
Webster. 

Orusciipum, i. e. horoscope, A. ii. 3. rubric. 

Osanne, i. e. Hosannah, B 642. 

Ost, s. host, army, L. 1906. 



7^ 



(ilossarial hxHtx. 



Ostelments, s. pi. furniture, household 
goods, B 2. p 5. 135. (L. supellectilis). 
Cf. F. outil. 

Ostesse, s. hostess, B 4. m 3. 23. 

Otes, s.pl. (of) oats, D 1963. 

Other, adj. second, R. 953, 976 ; the other, 
A 427; what 0., what else, T. i. 799; 
that o., the other, F 496; Other, //. 
others, R. 1304; Othere, pi. other, A 
794; others, HF. 215 1 ; ^if«. //. others', 
HF. 2153; Otheres, gen. sing, each 
other's (lit. of the other), C 476. 

Other, coftj. or, 3. 810; Other ... or, 
either ... or, G 1149. 

Other-whyle, adv. sometimes, B 2. p i. 
120. 

Ouche, s. nouch, clasp, D 743. See Nou- 
chis. 

Oug'ht, s. anything, 3. 459; as adv. at all, 
T. ii. 268 ; in ought that, in as far as, T, 
iii. 1241. 

Oug-htestow, oughtest thou, L. 1957. 

Oule, s. owl, D 1081. 

Oules, pi. awls; spiked irons for tor- 
menting men, D 1730. A. S. awel. 

Ounces,//, small portions, A 677 ; ounces, 
G756. 

Ounded, pp. wavy, T. iv. 736. 

Ounding'e, s. adornment with waved 
lines, I 417. 

Oundy, adj. wavy, HF. 1386. F. onde. 

Out, adv. out, A 45, &c. ; used for come 
out, HF. 2139; go out, T. iv, 210; fully, 
T. iii. 417 ; mordre wil out, murder will 
out, B 1766 ; Out and out, entirely, T. ii. 

739- 
Out, interj. alas! A 3825; Out! harrow! 

B 4570. 
Out of, prep, without, C 157 ; out of, A 

452. 
Out-breke, v. break out, break silence, 

2. 12. 
Out-breste, v. burst out, T. iv. 237. 
Out-bring-e, v. utter, L. 1835. 
Outcast, pp. cast out, T. v. 615. 
Out-caug-hte, pt. s. drew out, B 1861. 
Out-drawe, pp. drawn out, T. iv. 1226. 
Oute, adv. away, T. v. 553 ; out, i. e. 

uttered, D 977. 
Outen, V. put out, utter, exhibit, G 834; 

utter, E 2438 ; Oute, i pr. s. utter, offer, 

D 521. A. S. Titian. 
Outereste, adj. super I. uttermost, far- 
thest, B 2. m 6. 17. 
Outerly, adv. utterly, entirely, E 335. 
Outfleying-e, s. flying out, HF. 1523. 
Out-hees, s. outcry, hue and cry, alarm, 

A 2012. 



Outher, conj. either, R. 250. 
Outherwhyle, adv. sometimes, B 2733, 

2857. 
Outlandish, adj. foreign, 9. 22. 
Outrag'e, s. excess {luxu), B 2. m 5. 5 ; 

cruelty, injustice, A 2012. 
Outrageous, adj. excessive, B 2180; im- 
moderate, I 743 ; violent, rampant, R. 

174 ; excessively bold, R. 1257. 
Outrag'eously, adv. excessively, A 3998. 
Outrance, s. great hurt, excessive injury, 

24. 26. 
Outraye, v. lose temper, E 643. O. F. 

outreer, to surpass. 
Outrely, adj. utterly, B 4419 ; entirely, B 

2943. 3072; decidedly, B 2210. 
Out-ring-e, v. ring out, T. iii. 1237. 
Out-rood,//, s. rode out, T. v. 604. 
Out-rydere, j. rider abroad, A 166. The 

name of a monk who rode to inspect 

granges, &c. 
Out-spring-e, v. come to light, T. i. 745; 

Out-sprong, />/. s. spread abroad, C iii. 
Out-sterte. pt.pl. started out, B 4237. 
Out-straughte, pt. s. stretched out, R. 

1515- 
Out-taken, pp. excepted, B 277. 
Out-twyne, 2 pr. pi. twist out, utter, 12. 

II. 
Out-vrende, v. proceed, HF. 1645. 
Over, prep, above, R. 1475 ; beyond, D 

1661 ; besides, F 137 ; Over hir might, 

to excess, C 468. 
Over, adj. upper, A 133 ; Overest, superl. 

uppermost, A 290. 
Over-al, adv. everjrwhere, A 216, 249, 

1207 ; in all directions, T. i. 928 ; on all 

sides, D 264; in every way, E 2129; 

throughout, E 1048 ; Over al and al, 

beyond every other, 3. 1003. 
Over-blowe, pp. past, L. 1287. 
Overcaste, v. overcast, sadden, A 1536. 
Overcomer, s. conqueror, B i. m 2. 15. 
Overdoon, pp. carried to excess, G 645. 
Over-gilt, adj. worked over with gold, 

R. 873- 

Over-goon, v. pass away, T. i. 846 ; over- 
spread, B 2. p 7. 42. 

Overkerveth, pr. s. cuts across, crosses, 
A. i. 21. 90. 

Overlad,//. put upon, B 3101. Lit. led 
over. 

Overlade, v. overload, L. 621. 

Overlight, adj. too feeble, B 4. m 3, 34. 

Over-loked, pp. perused, 3. 232. 

Overlyeth, pr. s. lies upon, I 575. 

Over-passeth, pr. s. surpasses, B 5. p 6. 
117. 



(ilossarial EntJei. 



79 



Over-raughte, pt. s. reached over, hence, 
urged on, T. v. 1018. 

Over-shake,//, shaken off, 5. 681. 

Overshote, //. ; had overshote hem, had j 
over-run the scent, 3. 383. 

Over-skipte, i pt. s. skipped over, 
omitted, 3. 1208. 

Oversloppe, s. upper-garment, G 633. 
Cf. I eel. yfirsloppr, an upper garment. 
See Sloppes. 

OverspredQp v. spread over, cover, E 
1799 ; Over-sprat, pr. s. over-spreadeth, 
T. ii. 767 ; Overspradde, pi. s. covered, 
A 2871. 

Overspring-e, pr. s. subj. overpass, F 
1060. 

Overtake, v. overtake, attain to, G 682; 
Overtook, i pt. s. caught up, 3. 360. 

Overbe. adj. open, HF. 718. 

Overthrowe, v. be overturned, be ruined, 
HF. 1640. 

Over-throwing'e, adj. overwhelming, B 
I. m 2. 2; headlong (Lat. praecipiti), 
B 2. m 7. 1 ; headstrong (Lat. praecipiti) , 
B I. m 6. 25 ; revolving, B 3. m 12. 43. 

Overthrowing'e, s. falling down, B 2755 ; 
pi. destruction (I>at. minis), B 2. m 4. 17. 

Overthwart, adv. across, A 1991 ; op- 
posite, T, iii. 685 ; askance, R. 292. 

Overtyraelictie, adv. untimely, B i. m 
I. 18. 

Over-whelveth, pr. s. overturns, turns 
over, agitates, B 2. m 3. 17. 

Owen, V. owe, own, possess ; Oweth, 
pr. s. owns, possesses, C 361; Oweth, 
pr. s. rejl. it is incumbent (on him), 
L. 360 a ; Oghte, i pt. s. ought, 4. 216 ; 
Oughtestow, 2 p)t. s. oughtest thou, T. 
V. 545 ; L. 1957 ; Oghte, pt, s. impers. it 
were necessary, B 2188 ; hitn oghte, he 
ought, L. 377; it became him, B 1097; 
hir oghte, became her, E 1120; us oghte, 
it behoved us, we ought, i. 119; hem 
oghte, they ought, G 1340; us oghte 
(subj.), it should behove us, we ought, 
E 1150; Oghte, //. s. owed, L. 589; 
ought, A 505 ; Owed, pp. due, B 4. p 
5.18. 

Owene, adj. def. own, C 834 : myn owene 
woman, independent, T. ii. 750 ; his 
owne hand, with his own hand, A 3624. 

Owh, interj. alas, B i. p 6. 25. 

Owher, adv. anywhere, A 653. 

Oxe, s. ox, C 354 ; Oxes, gen. E 207 ; Oxen, 
pi. A 887. 

Oxe-stalle, s. ox-stall, E 398. 

Oynement, s. ointment, unguent, A 631. , 

Oynons, //, onions, A 634. 



Paas, s. pace, step, L. 284; goon a paas, 
go at a footpace, C 866. 

Pace, V. pass, go, A 1602; pass, T. i. 371 ; 
go away, 15. 9 ; pass away, A 175 ; sur- 
pass, go beyond, T. iii. 1272; walk, T. v. 
1791 ; overstep, HF. 392; come, HF. 
720 ; p. of, pass over, T. ii. 1568 ; of this 
thing to p., to pass this over in review, 
HF. 239; to pace of, to pass from, B 
205; \pr. s. pass over (it), go on, HF. 
1355; proceed, go on, A 36; i pr. s. 
subj. depart, F 494; 2 pr. s. subj. go, 
D 9H. 

Paillet, s. pallet, T. iii. 229. 

Paire, s. pair, A 473; set, A 159; as pi. 
pairs, 5. 238. {Pair, in the sense of 
' set,' is applied to many things of the 
same kind and size.) 

Paisible, adj. peaceable, 9. i. 

Palasye, s. palsy, R. 1098. 

Pale, s. perpendicular stripe, HF. 1840. 

Palestral, adj. athletic, pertaining to 
wrestling, T. v. 304. 

Paleth, pr. s. renders pale, B 2. m 3. 3. 

Paleys-, or Paleis-chautnbres, pi. 
palace-chambers, 9. 41. 

Paleys-gardyn, palace-garden, T. ii. 508. 

Paleys-ward, to, toward the palace, T. 
ii. 1252. 

Paleys-yates, pi. gates of the palace, 
4. 82. 

Palinge, s. adorning with (heraldic) 
pales, or upright stripes, I 417. 

Palis, s. palisade, stockade, B i. p 6. 41 ; 
paling, rampart, B i. p 3. 86. O. F. 
palis, paleis. 

Palled, pp. pale, languid, H 55. 

Pan, s. brain-pan, skull, A 1165. 

Panade, s. kind of knife, A 3939, 3960. 

Panier, s. pannier, E 1568 ; pi. baskets 
for bread, HF. 1939. 

Panne, s. pan, A 3944. 

Panter, s. bag-net for birds, L. 131 ; pi. 
nets, R. 1621. O. Y.pantiere. 

Papejay, s. popinjay, B 1559, 1957, E 2332 ; 
applied in England to the green wood- 
pecker ( Gecinus viridis) . 

Paper, s. account-book, A 4404. 

Paper-whyt, adj. white as paper, L. 
1 198. 

Paping-ay, s. popinjay, R. 81. See Pape- 
jay. 

Par atnour ; see Paramour. 

Par cas, by chance, C 885. 

Par cotnpanye, for company, A 3839, 4167. 

Paradys, s. paradise, R. 443. 



8o 



(©logsarial Intiei. 



Parage, J. kindred, birth, D 250; rank, 
D I 120. 

Paraments, //, mantles, splendid cloth- 
ing, A 2501. See Parements. 

Paramour, {iox par amour) , adv. for love, 
B 2033 ; longingly, B 1933 ; with devo- 
tion, A 1 155; Paramours, passionately, 
T. V. 332; A 2112 ; with excessive 
devotion, L. 260 a; by way of passionate 
love, T. v. 158 ; for p., for the sake of 
passion, E 1450 ; for paramours, for love's 
sake, A 3354. 

Paramour, s. (i) concubine, wench, D 
454; pi. A 3756; lovers, paramours, T. 
ii. 236; Paramour (2), love-making, A 
4372. 

Paraunter, perhaps, L. 362. 

Paraventure, peradventure, perhaps, F 

955- 

Parcel, s. part, F 852; small part, 2. 106. 

Parchemin, s. parchment, B 5. m 4. 14. 

Pardee, (F./ar Dieu), a common oath, 
A 563, 3084; Pardieux, T. i. 197. 

Pardoner, s. seller of indulgences, A 
543, C 318. 

Paregal, adj. fully equal, T. v. 840. 

Parements, s.pl. rich hangings or orna- 
ments, (applied to a chamber), L. 1106; 
F 269. See Paraments. 

Parentele, s. kinship, I 908. 

Parfey, by my faith, in faith, HF. 938. 

Parflt, adj. perfect, A 72, 422. 

Parfitly, adv. perfectly, R. 771 ; wholly, 
B 2381. 

Parfourne, v. perform, B 2402; Par- 
fourne, ger. to fulfil, B 3137 ; /. tip, 
complete, D 2261. 

Parfourning-e, s. performance, I 807. 

Parisshiens,//. parishioners, A 482, 

Paritorie, s. pellitory, Parietaria offici- 
nalis, G 581. 

Parlement, s. (i) deliberation, decision 
due to consultation, A 1306; (2) par- 
liament, T. iv. 143 ; p. of Briddes, 
Parliament of Birds, I 1086. 

Parodie, s. period, duration, T. v. 1548. 
(A curious confusion of parodie (so 
pronounced) \v\\}[i period.) 

Parsoneres, s. pi. partners, partakers, 
B 5. p 5. loi. 

Parten, v. share, T. i. 589; ger. To p. 
with, participate in, L, 465 ; i pr. s. 
part, depart, T. i. 5 ; Parteth, pr. s. 
departs, L. 359; Parted,//, dispersed, 
T. i. 960 ; gone away, taken away, L. 
mo. 

Parteners, s. pi. partners, partakers, I 
968. 



Parting-felawes, s. pi. fellow-partakers, 
I 637. 

Part-les, adj. without his share, B 4. p 3. 
44. 

Partrich, s. partridge, A 349. 

Party, adv. partly, A 1053. 

Party e, J-. portion, A 3008; partial um- 
pire, taker of a side, A 2657 ; portion, 
T. ii. 394. 

Parvys, s. church-porch, A 310. 

Pas, s. pace, B 399; step, D 2162; dis- 
tance, R. 525 ; foot-pace, A 825 ; grade, 
degree, 4, 134 ; grade, I 532 ; passage, 
B 2635 ; a pas, at a footpace, T. ii. 627, 
V. 60 ; F 388 ; //. paces, yards, A 1890 ; 
thousand pas, a mile, B i. p 4. 270. 

Passage, s. period, R. 406. 

Passant, pres. pt. as adj. surpassing, A 
2107. 

Passen, ger. to surpass, exceed, conquer, 
A 3089 ; overcome, L. 162 ; outdo, G 
857 ; pr. s. passes away, F 404 ; Paste, 
pt. s. passed, T. ii. 658 ; passed by, T. 
ii. 398 ; Passing, pres. pt. surpassing, 
A 2885 ; //. past, spent, E 610 ; sur- 
passed, 7. 82; passed by, 5. 81; over- 
blown, gone off, R. 1682. 

Passing, adj. excellent, F 929; extreme, 
E 1225. 

Passioun, s. suffering, B 1175; passion, 
I. 162; passive feeling, impression, B 
5. m 4. 52. 

Pastee, s. pasty, A 4346. 

Patrimoine, s. patrimony, I 790. 

Patroun, s. patron, 4. 275 ; protector, 7. 
4; pattern, 3. 910, 

Pawmes, //. palms (of the hand), T. iii. 
1 1 14. 

Pax, s. the ' osculatorium,' or ' paxbrede,' 
a disk of metal or other substance, used 
at Mass for the ' kiss of peace,' I 407. 

Pay, s. pleasure, 5. 271 ; 7nore to pay, so 
as to give more satisfaction, 5. 474. 

Paye, v. pay, A 806; pt. s. A 539; //. 
satisfied, pleased, 9. 3 ; holde her payd, 
think herself satisfied, 3. 269. 

Payen, adj. pagan, A 2370. 

Payens, s.pl. pagans, L. 786. 

Payndemayn, s. bread of a peculiar 
whiteness, B 1915. Lat. panis Domini- 
cus. 

Payne, s. pain; dide his payne, took 
pains, F. 730. 

Payre, s. a pair, R. 1386; Paire, //. pairs, 
R. 1698. 

Pece, s. piece, 5. 149; //. pieces, T. i. 833. 

.Peches, pi. peaches, R. 1374. 

Pecok, s. peacock, 5. 356. 



(glogsarial Intjei. 



8i 



Pecok-arwes, //. arrows with peacocks' 

feathers, A 104. 
Pecunial, adj. pecuniary, D 1314. 
Pees, s. peace, A 532, 1447; in p., in 

silence, B 228. 
Pees, peace ! hush ! be still ! B 836. 
Pekke, s. peck (quarter of a bushel), A 

4010. 
Pekke, imp. s. peck, pick, B 4157. 
Pel, s. peel, small castle, HF. 1310. O. F. 

pe/ ; from Lat. ace. pa/um. 
Pelet, s. pellet, stone cannon-ball, HF. 

1643. 
Penaunt, s. a penitent, one who does 

penance, B 3154. 
Pencel (i), s. pencil, brush, A 2049. 
Pencel (2), s. small banner, sleeve worn 

as a token, T. v. 1043. Short ioxpenoncel. 
P6nible, ^zi^'. painstaking, B 3490; Peni- 

ble, careful to please, E 714; Penyble, 

inured, D 1846. 
Penitauncer, s. confessor who assigns a 

penance, I 1008. 
Penitence, s. penance, I loi, 126. 
Penne, s. pen, quill, L. 2357. 
Penner, s. pen-case, E 1879. 
Penoun, s. pennon, ensign or small flag 

borne at the end of a lance, A 978. 
Pens ; see Peny. 
Peny, s. penny, R. 451; money, A4119; 

Penyes, pi. pence, R. 189; Pens, pi. 

pence, C 376. 
Per cas, by chance, L. 1967. 
Per consequens, consequently, D 2192. 
Peraventure, adv. perhaps, HF. 304; C 

935- 
Percen, v. pierce, B 2014; pr. s. pierces 

with his gaze, 5. 331. 
Perche, s. perch (for birds to rest on), 

A 2204 ; wooden bar, R. 225 ; a horizon- 
tal rod, A. ii. 23. 44. Xjai. pertica. 
Percinge, s.\ for percinge = to prevent 

any piercing, B 2052. 
Perdurable, adj. everlasting, eternal, 

B 2699; Perdurables, a^'.//. everlasting, 

I 811. 
Perdurabletee, s. immortality, B 2. p 7. 

63, 103. 
Pere s. peer, equal, B 3244, F 678. 
Peregryn, adj. peregrine, i. e. foreign, 

F428. 
Pere-jonette, s. a kind of early-ripe 

pear, A 3248. 
Peres, pi. pears, R. 1375, E 2331. 
Perflt, adj. complete, A. i. 18. 4. 
Perfltly, adv. perfectly, A. pr. 21. 
Perfourne, ger. to perform, B 2256; be 

equivalent to, A. ii. 10. 16. 



Peril, J. B 2672 ; in p. in danger, 4. 108 ; 

upon my /., (I say it) at my peril, D 

561. 
Perisse, v. perish, I 254. 
Perle, s, pearl, L. 221. 
Perled, //. fitted with pearl-like drops^ 

A 3251. 
Perr66, s. jewellery, precious stones^ 

gems, B 3495, 3550. 
Perrye, s. jewellery, A 2936 ; Perrie, HF. 

1393. 
Pers, adj. of Persian dye, light-blue^ 

R. 67. 
Pers, s. stuff of a sky-blue colour, A 439, 

617. 
Pers6veraunce, s. endurance, T. i. 44; 

constancy, 3. 1007. 
Persevere, v. continue, D 148; pr. s. 

lasts, C 497. 
Pers^veringe, s. perseverance, G 117. 
Persly, s. parsley, A 4350. 
Pers6ne, s. person, figure, T. ii. 701 ; 

Persoun, parson, A 478. 
Pert, adj. forward, frisky, A 3950. Short 

for apert. 
Pertinacie, s. pertinaciousness, I 391. 
Pertinent, adj. fitting, B 2204. 
Pertourbe. ^^r. to perturb, T. iv. 561. 
Perturbacioun, s. trouble, B i. p i. 98. 
Perturbing-e, s. perturbation, D 2254. 
Pervenke, s. periwinkle, R. 903 ; Per- 

vinke, R. 1432. 
Pesen,//. peas, L. 648. 
Pesible, adj. calm, B i. p 5. 3. 
Pestilence, s. the (great) pestilence, A 

442, C 679 ; curse, B 4600, D 1264. 
Peter, interj. by St. Peter, B 1404, G 665. 
Peyne, s. pain of torture, A 1133, T. i. 

674; in the p., under torture, T. iii. 

1502; care, F 509; toil, G 1398; penalty, 

B 3041 ; endeavour, R. 765 ; penance, 

B 2939 ; upon p., under a penalty, E 586. 
Peyne, v. reji. take pains, endeavour, B 

4495; put (myself) to trouble, HF. 246; 

Peyne, i pr. s. reJl. take pains, C 330, 

395 ; Peyned hir, pt. s. reJl. took pains, 

A 139, E 976; Peyned hem, pi. pi. reJl. 

R. 107. 
Peynte, v. paint, C 12; colour highly,, 

HF. 246; smear, L. 875 ; do p., cause to 

be painted, 3. 259; pt. s. F 560 ; Peynted, 

pp. painted, L. 1029; Peynt,//. R. 248. 
Peyntour, s. painter, T. ii. 1041. 
Peynture, s. painting, C 33. 
Peyre, -f. pair, A 2121 ; a set (of similar 

things), D 1741. 
Peysible, adj. tranquil, B 3. m 9. 51, 

(L. iranquilla.) 



D3 



82 



@l00sarial hxtitx. 



Peytrel, s. poitrel, breast-piece of a 
horse's harness ; properly, the breast- 
plate of a horse in armour, G 564 ; //. 
I 433. A. F. peitrel, Lat. pectorale. 

Phitonesses, pL pythonesses, witches, 
HF, 1 261. 

[Physices, gen. of physics, or natural 
philosophy, B 1189. Lat. physices, gen. 
of physice, natural philosophy. (I pro- 
pose this reading.)] 

Pich, s. pitch, A 3731, I 854. 

Pietee, s. pity, T. iii. 1033, v. 1598. 

Pietous, adj. piteous, sad, T. iii. 1444 ; 
sorrowful. 1' v. 451 ; merciful, F 20. 

Pigges-nye (lit. pig's eye), a dear little 
thing, A 3268. 

Pig-hte,//". s. refl. pitched, fell, A 2689; 
//. s. subj. should pierce, should stab, 
I. 163 (but this is almost certainly an 
error iox prighte, pt. s. subj. oiprikke). 

Piked, pt. s. stole, L, 2467. 

Pikerel, s. a young pike (fish), E 1419. 

Pilche, s. a warm furred outer garment, 
20. 4. 

Pile, ger. to pillage, plunder, I 769; v. 
rob, despoil, D 1362. 

Piled, //. deprived of hair, very thin, 
A 627; bare, bald (lit. peeled), A 3935. 

Pileer, s. pillar, HF. 1421. 

Pilled, pp. robbed, L. 1262. 

Pilours, pi. robbers, pillagers, A 1007, 
1020. 

Pilwe, s. pillow, E. 2004. 

Pilwe-beer, s. pillow-case, A 694. 

Piment, s. sweetened wine, A 3378. 

Pin, s. pin, small peg, F 127, 316; fasten- 
ing, brooch, A 196; thin wire, A. ii. 
38. 8 ; Hangeth on a joly pin, is merry, 
E 1516. 

Pinche, v. find fault (with), pick a hole 
(in), A 326; Pinchest at, 2.pr.s. blamest, 
lo- 57 '< PP- closely pleated, A 151. 

Piper, s. as adj. suitable for pipes or 
horns, 5, 178. 

Pissemyre, s. pismire, ant, D 1825. 

Pistel, s. epistle, E 1154; message, sen- 
tence, D. 1021. 

Pit, pp. put (Northern), A 4088. 

Pitaunce, s. pittance, A 224. 

Pitee, s. pity, i. 68; Pite were, it would 
be a pity (if), 3. 1266. 

Pith, s. strength, R. 401 ; D 475. 

Pit6us, Pitous, adj. compassionate, A 
143; merciful, C 226; pitiful, A 953; 
plaintive, R. 89, 497 ; mournful, R. 
420; piteous, sad, sorrowful, A 955; 
pitiable, B 3673 ; Pitouse, fern, full of 
compassion, L. 2582. 



Pitously, adv. piteously, B 1059; pitiably, 

B 3729; sadly, A 1117. 
Place, s. place, A 623 ; manor-house 

(residence of a chief person in a small 

town or village), B 1910, D 1768. 
Placebo, vespers of the dead, so called 

from the initial word of the antiphon 

to the first psalm of the office (see Ps. 

cxiv. 9 in the Vulgate version), I 617; a 

song of flattery, D 2075. 
Plages, s. pi. regions, B 543 ; quarters of 

the compass, A. i. 5. 12. 
Plain, adj.; see Playn. 
Plane, s. plane-tree, A 2922. 
Planed, //. s. planed, made smooth, D 

1758. 
Plante, s. slip, cutting, D 763; piece of 

cut wood, R. 929. 
Piastres, s.pl. plasters, F 636. 
Plat, adj. flat, certain, A 1845; Platte, 

dat. flat (side of a sword), F 162, 164. 
Plat, adv. flat, B 1865; plainly, B 886; 

fully, T. ii. 579. 
Plate, s. plate-armour, 9, 49; stiff iron 

defence for a hauberk, B 2055 ; the 

' sight ' on the ' rewle,' A. i. 13. 2. 
Plated, pp. covered with metal in plates, 

HF. 1345. 
Platly, adv. flatly, plainly, T. iii. 786, 881. 
Plaunte, s. plant, F 1032. 
Plaunte, imp. s. plant, T. i. 964. 
Play en me, v. rejl. to amuse myself, R. 

113- 
Playing-, s. sport, R. 112. 
Playn, adj. smooth, even, R. 860; in 

short and pi., in brief, plain terms, E 

577 ; Plain, flat, H 229. 
Playn, s. plain, B 24. 
Plede.^^r. to dispute, B 2559. 
Pleding, s. pleading, 3. 615. 
Pledoures, pi. pleaders, lawyers, R. 198. 
Plee, J-, plea, 5. 485 ; pi. suits, 5. loi. 
Plegges, s.pl. pledges, B 3018. 
Pleinedest, 2 //. s. didst complain, B 4. 

p. 4. 168. 
Pleinte, s. complaint, lament, B 66. 
Plen^re, adj. plenary, full, L. 1607. 
Plentee, s. plenitude, fulness, I 1080; 

abundance, R. 1434. 
Plentevous. adj. plentiful, A 344. 
Plentevously, adv. plenteouslv, B 2. p 2. 

86. 
Plesaunce, s. pleasure, C 219, D 408 ; 

delight, A 2409 ; pleasant thing, 3. 773 ; 

pleasure, will, A 1571 ; kindness, E iiii ; 

pleasing behaviour, F 509 ; pleasantness, 

L. 1373 ; happiness, L. 1150 ; amusement, 

F 713 ; will, delight, B 149. 



(^lossarial Entiex. 



83 



Plesaunt, adj. pleasant, satisfactory, 
pleasing, A 138, 222. 

Plesen, v. please, A 610, F 707. 

Plesinges, adj. pi. pleasing, B 711. 

Plesure, s. pleasure, 6. 126. 

Pldte. ger. to plead, bring a law-suit, T. 
ii. 1468. 

Pleting-es, //. law-suits, B 3. p 3. 67. 

Pley, s. play, sport, A 1125; dalliance, 4. 
178 ; jesting, I 539 ; delusion, 3. 648 ; 
//. games, T. v. 304; plays, D 558; 
funeral games, T. v. 1499. 

Pleye, v. amuse oneself, B 3524, 3666; 
ger. to play, be playful, be amused, A 
772; to amuse (myself), B 3996; to 
amuse (ourselves), L. 1495; play (on 
an instrument), A 236; i pr. s. jest, B 
3153 ; I pr. pi. play, B 1423 ; //-. //. F 
900; pt. s. played, rejoiced, T. i. 1013 ; 
was in play, 3. 875; Pleyd, p/>. 3. 618. 

Pleyinge, s. amusement, sport, A 1061. 

Pleyinge, adj. playful, B 3. m 2. 27. 

Pleyn (i), adj. full, A 2461; complete, 

A 315. 337- 
Pleyn (2) , adj. plain, clear, L. 328 ; honest, 

5. 528; plain, i. e. open, A 987; as s. 

plain (fact), A 1091 ; pi. smooth, 5. 180. 
Pleyn (i), adv. {\i]],T.v. 1818; entirely, 

A 327. 
Pleyn (2), adv. plainly, A 790; openly, E 

637- 
Pleyne, v. complain, lament, B 1067 ; 

reji. 6. 50; V. to whinny (as a horse), 7. 

157 ; //. upon, cry out against, L. 2525 ; 

I pr. s. make complaint, L. 2512; pp. 

said by way of complaint, L. 326 a. 
Pleyning', s. complaining, lamenting, 3. 

599- 
Pleynly, adv. plainly, openly, {or, fully), 

A 1733- 
Pleynte, s. plaint, complaint, 2. 47 ; PI. 

of Kynde, Complaint of Nature, 5, 316. 
Plighte (i), pt. s. plucked, drew, T. ii. 

1120; pulled, B 15; //. plucked, torn, 

D 790. The infin. would be plicchen, 

variant oi plukkien ox plukken. 
Pligfhte (2) , I pr. s. plight, pledge, F 1537 ; 

pt. s. L. 2466 ; pp. pledged, C 702, 
Plomet, s. plummet, heavy weight, A. ii. 

23. 42. 
Plom-re'wle,j'. plummet-rule, A. ii. 38. 10. 
Plougli-harneys, s. harness for a plough, 

i. e. parts of a plough, as the share and 

coulter, A 3762. 
Ploumes, s. pi. plums, R. 1375. 
Ploungen, ger. to plunge, bathe, B 3. p 

2. 48. 
Ploungy, adj. stormy, rainy, B i. m 3. 9. 



Plowman, s. ploughman, E 799. 
Plukke, V. pluck, pull, T. iv. 1403. 
Plye, V. ply, mould, E 1430; bend, E 1169. 
Plyg"ht,//>. plighted, T. iii. 782. 
Plyt, s. plight, T. ii. 712, 1731 ; condition, 

B 2338; position, T. ii. 74; Plyte, dat. 

mishap, wretched condition, 5. 294; 

plight, 23. 19; state, G 952. 
Plyte, ger. to fold, T. ii. 1204; pt. s. 

turned backwards and forwards, T. ii. 

697. 
Poeplish, popular, T. iv. 1677. 
Poesye, s. poetry. T. v. 1790. 
Poinant. adj. poignant, I 130, 131. 
Point, Poynt, s. point, A 114; position, 

I 921 ; m point, on the point of, about 

to, B 331, 910; at point, ready, T. iv. 

1638 ; in good p., in good case, A 200 ; 

fro p. to p., from beginning to end, B 

3652; p. for p., in every detail, E 577. 
Point-devys ; at p., with great neatness, 

exactly, carefully, HF. 917 ; A 3689, F 

560. 
Pointel, s. style, i. e. stylus, writing im- 
plement, B I. p I. 3. 
Poke, s. bag, A 3780, 4278. 
Poked, //. s. incited, T. iii. 116; nudged, 

A 4169. 
Pokets, s.pl. little bags, G 808. 
Pokkes, s.pl. pocks, pustules, C 358. 
Pol (i), s. pole, long stick; Pole, ^aA L. 

2202. 
Pol (2) , s. pole (of the heavens) , A. i. 14. 9. 
Polax, s. pole-axe, L. 642. 
Polcat, s. polecat, C 855. 
Policye, s. public business, C 600. 
Pollax, s. pole-axe, A 2544. 
Polut,//- polluted, B I. p 4. 281. 
Polyve, s. pulley, F 184. 
Pomel, s. round part, top, A 2689. 
Pomely, adj. marked with round spots 

like an apple, dappled, A 616; Pomely- 

gris, dapple,gray, G 559. 
Pomg'arnettes, s. pi. pomegranates, R. 

1356. 

Pompe, s. pomp, A 525. 

Pool, s. pole (of the heavens), A. i. i8. 20. 

Pope-Holy, i. e. Hypocrisy, R. 415. 

Popelote, s. poppet, darling, A 3254. 

Popet, s. puppet, doll; spoken ironically, 
and really applied to a corpulent person, 
B 1 89 1. 

Popinjay, s. popinjay, R. 913. 

Poplar, s. poplar-tree, A 2921 ; (collec- 
tively) poplar-trees, R. 1385. 

Popped, pt. s. reJl. tricked herself out, 
R. 1019. 

Popper, s. small dagger, A 3931. 



84 



©lossarial Intiei. 



Poraille, s. poor people, A 247. 

Porche, s. Porch, B 5. m 4. i. 

Pore, adj. poor, L. 388. 

Porisme, s. corollary, B 3. p 10. 166. 

Porphurie, s. a slab of porphyry used as 

a mortar, G 775. 
Port (i), s. port, carriage, behaviour, A 

69 ; bearing, mien, L. 2453. 
Port (2), s. haven, T. i. 526, 969. 
Portatif, adj. portable, 3. 53. 
Porthors, s. portesse, breviary, B 1321. 

From porter, to carry, hors, abroad. 
Portours, pi. porters, T. v. 1139. 
Portreiture, s. drawing, picture, R. 827 ; 

set of drawings, A 1968 ; picturing, HF. 

131. 
Portreye, v. pourtray, depict, i. 81; 

Portrayed, pp. painted in fresco, R. 140 ; 

full of pictures, R. 1077. 
Portreying, s. a picture, A 1938. 
Pose, s. a cold in the head, A 4152, H 62. 

A. ^.ge-pose. 
Pose, I pr. s. put the case, (will) suppose, 

A 1162, 
Positif, adj. positive, fixed, A 1167. 
Positioun, s. supposition, hypothesis, 

B 5. p 4. 48. 
Possessioners, s. pi. men who are en- 
dowed, D 1722. 
Possessioun, s. great possessions, wealth, 

F 686; endowments, D 1926. 
Posseth, pr. s. pusheth, tosseth, L. 2420. 
Post, s. support, A 214; pillar, A 800. 
Postum, s. imposthume, abscess, B3. p 4. 

14. 
Potdg-e, s. broth, B 3623, C 368. 
Potente, s. crutch, R. 368 ; staff, D 1776, 
Potestat, s. potentate, D 2017. 
Pothecdrie, s. apothecary, C 852. 
Pouche, s. pocket, A 3931 ; pi. money- 
bags, A 368. 
Poudre, s. dust, HF. 536 ; powder, G 760 ; 

gunpowder, HF\ 1644. 
Poudred, //>. besprinkled, R. 1436. 
Poudre-marchaunt, s. the name of a 

kind of spice, A 381. 
Pounage, s. pannage, swine's food, 9. 7. 
Pound, pi. pounds, A 454. 
Poune. s. pawn at chess, 3. 661. 
Pounsoned,//. as adj. stamped, pierced, 

I 421. 
Pounsoning-e, s. punching of holes in 

garments, I 418. 
Pouped, pt. pi. blew hard, puffed, B 4589 ; 

pp. blown, H 90. 
Poure,^^;-. to pore, look closely, A 185; 

to pore over (it), R. 1640; \ pr.pl. (we) 

pore, gaze steadily, G 670. 



Poured, pp. poured, R. 1148. 
Pouring-, s. pouring (in), T. iii. 1460. 
Pous, s. pulse, T. iii. 1114. 
Poustee, s. power, B 4. p 5. 13. 
Povertee, s. poverty, 3. 410 ; Pov6rte, s. 

poverty, T. iv. 1520; P6vert, poverty,^ 

R. 450 ; Pov6rt, C 441. 
Povre, adj. poor, R. 466, A 225. 
Povre, adj. as s. poor, hence poverty, 10. 2. 
Povre, adv. poorly, E 1043. 
Povreliche, adj. poorly, in poverty, E 213, 

1055. 

Povrely, adv. in poor array, A 1412. 

Povrest, adj. superl. poorest, C 449, E 205, 

Poynaunt, adj. pungent, A 352, B 4024. 

Poynt, s. sharp point, 7. 211 ; very object, 
aim, A 1501; point, bit (of it), part, R. 
1236; a stop, G 1480; up p., on the 
point, T. iv. 1153; in p. is, is on the 
point, is ready, i. 48 ; fro p. to p., in 
every point, 5. 461 ; to the /., to the 
point, 5. 372 ; at p. devys, exact at all 
points, R. 830 ; to perfection, exquisitely, 
R. 1215 ; pi. tags, A 3322. 

Poynte, ger. to describe, T. iii. 497 ; pr. 
pi. stab, R. 1058 ; pp. pointed, R. 944. 

Poyntel, s. style for writing, D 1742. 

Practisour, s. practitioner, A 422. 

Praktike, s. practice, D 187. 

Praye, s. prey, i. 64. 

Praye, pr. pi. petition, make suit, I 785. 

Praying, s. request, prayer, R. 1484. 

Preamble, s. D 831. 

Preambulacioun, s. preambling, D 837. 

Precedent, adj. preceding, A. ii. 32. 4. 

Preche, v. preach, A 481, 712; Preche- 
stow, thou preachest, D 366. 

Prechour, s. preacher, D 165. 

Preciousness, s. costliness, I 446. 

Predestinee, s. predestination, T. iv. 966, 

Predicacioun, s. preaching, sermon, B 
1 179. 

Preef , s. proof, assertion, D 247 ; ex- 
perience, L. 528 a ; test, proof, G 968 ; 
the test, H 75. 

Prees, s. press, crowd, B 393, 646; the 
throng of courtiers, 13. 4 ; press of battle, 
9. 33 ; in p., in the crowd, 5. 603. 

Preesseth,//-. s. throngs, A 2580. 

Prefectes. gen. prefect's, G 369. Lit. ' an 
officer of tlie prefect's (officers).' 

Preferre, /;■. s. subj. precede, take pre- 
cedence of, D 96. 

Preignant, pres. pt. plain, convincing, 
T. iv. 1 179. 

Preisen, ger. to praise, (worthy) of being 
praised, R. 70; v. appraise, estimate, R. 
1115; prize, esteem, R. 1693. 



(Slossavial JEnbei. 



85 



Preiseres, s.pl. praisers, B 2367. 

Preising-e, s. honour, glory, I 949. 

Preldt, s. prelate, A 204. 

Premisses, pi. statements laid down, 
B 3. p 10. 121. 

Prenostik, s. prognostic, prognostication, 
10. 54. 

Prente, s. print, D 604. 

Prenten, ger. to imprint, T. ii. 900. 

Pr6ntis, s. apprentice, A 4365. 

Prentishood, s. apprenticeship, A 4400. 

Prescience, s. foreknowledge, A 1313. 

Prese, ger. to press forward, T. i. 446; 
V. hasten, 2. 19. 

Presence, s. i. 19; i7i pr., in a large 
assembly, E 1207. 

Present, adv. immediately, 5. 424. 

Presentarie, adj. ever-present, B 5. p 6.78. 

Presented, pp. brought, L. 1297. 

Presenting, s. offering, L. 1135. 

Presently, adv. at the present moment, 
B 5. p 6. 123. 

President, s. the one who presided in 
parliament, T. iv. 213. 

Pres6un, s. prison, T. iii. 380. 

Press, s. throng, T, i. 173 ; Presse, dat. 
instrument exercising pressure, A 81 ; 
mould, A 263 ; on presse, under a press, 
in a suppressed state, down, T. i. 559; 
press, a cupboard with shelves (for linen, 
&c.), A 3212. 

Prest, s. priest, B 1166. 

Prest, adj. ready, prepared, prompt, 5. 
307 ; pi. prompt, T. iv. 661. 

Pretende, v. attempt to reach, seek 
(after), T, iv. 922. 

Preterit, s. past time, D 5. p 6. 48. 

Pretorie, s. the Roman imperial body- 
guard, the Pretorian cohort, B i. p 4. 94. 

Preve, s. proof, B 4173 ; experimental 
proof, A. ii. 23 rubric; at p., (when it 
comes) to the proof, T. iii. 1002; at p., 
in the proof, T. iv. 1659; amies preve, 
proof of fighting power, T. i. 470. 

Preve, v. prove, C 169; bide the test, 
G 645 ; succeed when tested, G 1212 ; 
Preved, pp. proved to be so, T. i. 239; 
tested, G 1336 ; approved, E 28 ; ex- 
emplified, E 826; shewn, F 481. 

Prevetee, s. secret place, recess, T. iv. 
mi. 

Prevey, adj. secret, B 4. p 3. 122. 

Previdence, s. seeing beforehand, B 5. 
p6. 131. 

Prevy, adj. privy, unobserved, 3. 382 ; not 
confidential, HF. 285. 

Preye, ger. to beseech, T. ii. 1369; to 
pray, 2. 20 ; Preyde, pt. s. B 391 ; 



Preyeden, pt. pi. D 895 ; Preyed, pp. E 

773- 

Preys, s. praise, B 3837. 

Pricasour, $. a hard rider, A 189. 

Prighte, //. s. pricked, F 418 {inferior 
MSS. have pighte). No doubt, the 
reading pighte in i. 163 should also be 
prighte. See Priken. 

Priken, v. incite, urge, T. iv. 633 ; Prik, 
I pr. s. spur, rouse, 5. 389; Priketh,//-. 
s. excites, A 11, 1043; spurs, D 656; 
pricks, aches, D 1594; Prighte, //. s. 
F 418 (see above) ; Priked, pt. s. spurred, 
B 1964. 

Priking", s. hard riding, A 191, 2599. 

Prikke, s. point, HF. 907; sting, I 468; 
a small mark, a peg, A. ii. 42. 4 ; a dot, 
A. ii. 5. 20 ; piercing stroke, A 2606 ; 
point, critical condition, B 119. 

Principals, adj.pl. cardinal, A. ii. 31. 17. 

Principio in, in the beginning (St.' John, 
i.i), A 254. 

Pris, s. prize, A 2241. 

Privee, adj. secret, A 3295; private, 
I 102; intimate, R. 600; closely atten- 
dant, E 192; privee man, private in- 
dividual, B 2. p 3. 77. 

Privee, adv. secretly, F 531 ; Privee and 
apert, secretly and openly, D 11 14; pr. 
■ne ap., neither secretly nor openly, D 1 136. 

Privee, s. privy, C 527, E 1954. 

Prively, adv. secretly, A 652; unper- 
ceived, R. 784. 

Privetee, s. privacy, R. 1294; secrecy, 
B 548 ; secrets, secret, D 531, 542, 1637; 
private affairs, A 141 1; private apart- 
ment, A 4334; privy parts, B 3905. 

Privy, adj. secret, L. 1267, 1780. 

Proces, s. process, B 2665 ; proceeding, 
f 1345 ; process of time, F 829 ; argu- 
ment, B 3. p 10. 62; matter, T. ii. 485; 
Iv. 1914; story, HF. 251; occurrence of 
events, B 3511 ; dat. course (of time), 3. 

1331- 
Procutour, used for Procurator, proctor, 

D 1596. 
Proeve, s. proof, B 5. p 4. 83. 
Proeve, i pr. s. approve, B 5. p 3. 28 ; 

pr. s. shews, B 2. m i. 17. 
Professioun, s. profession of religion, 

D 1925; oath of profession (as a monk), 

B 1345. 
Proferestow, dost thou offer, T. iii. 1461. 
Prof re, s. offer, L. 2079. 
Proheme, s. proem, prologue, E 43. 
Prolaciouns, s.pl, utterances, B 2. p i. 50. 
ProUe, 2 pr. pi. prowl about, search 

widely, G 1412. 



86 



(§lo0!3arial EntiEX* 



Pronounced, pp. announced, T. iv. 213. 

Proporcionables, adj.pl. proportional, 
B 3. m 9. 20. 

Propor.cioned, pp. made in proportion, 
F 192. 

Proporcionels, s.pl. proportional parts, 
F 1278. 

Propre, adj. own, T. iv, 83; especial, B 
2175; peculiar, D 103; well-grown, A 
3972 ; well-made, A 3345 ; comely, A 4368 ; 
handsome, C 309 ; Propres, pi. own, B 
I. m 6. 20; of propre kinde, by their own 
natural bent, F 610. 

Proprely, adv. fitly, A 1549; literally, I 
285; naturally, D 1191 ; appropriately, 
A 729. 

Propretee, s. peculiarity, 10. 69; charac- 
teristic, B 2364; peculiar possession, T. 
iv. 392. 

Prose, V. write in prose, 16. 41. 

Prospectyves, s. pi. perspective-glasses, 
lenses, F 234. Chaucer here makes the 
usual distinction between reflecting mir- 
rors and refracting lenses. 

Prospre, adj. prosperous; prospre for- 
tunes, well-being, B i. p 4. 62. 

Protestacioun, s. protest, A 3137. 

Prove, V. test, A. ii. 23, rubric ; Proveth, 
pr. s. proves, F455. 

Prov6rbed, //. said in proverbs, T. iii. 

293- 

Provost, s. prefect, B i. p 4. 64; chief 
magistrate, B 1806. 

Provostrie, s. praetorship, B 3. p 4. 90. 

Prow, s. profit, advantage, B 1598, 4140, 
C 300, G 609. 

Prowesse, s. prowess, T. i. 438 ; excel- 
lence, D 1129; profit, B 4. p 3. 71. 

Proyneth,/r. s. prunes, i. e. trims, makes 
(himself) neat, E 2011. O.Y. proigtter. 

Prydelees, adj. without pride, 6. 29. 

Prye, ger. to pry, peer, T. ii. 404 ; to gaze, 
A 3458 ; V. spy, T. ii. 17 10. 

Pryme, s. prime (of day), usually 9 A.M., 
A 2189, 2576, 3554 ; fully pr., the end of 
the first period of the day (from 6 A.M. 
to 9 A.M.),B 2015 ; pr. large, p2iSi 90'clock, 
F 360 ; passed pr., past 9 o'clock, D 1476 ; 
half way pryme, half way between 6 and 
9 A.M., half-past seven, A 3906. 

Pryme face, s. the first glance, T. iii. 919. 

Prymerole, s. primrose, A 3268. 

Prys, s. price, value, R. 1134; worth, ex- 
cellence, F 911 ; praise, E 1026; esteem, 
F 934; glory, L. 2534; reputation, D 
1152; renown, A 67, 237; prize, I 355. 

"Pryse, ger. to esteem, to be esteemed, R. 
887. 



Pry ved, pp. deprived, exiled, i. 146. 
Pryvee, adj. secret, A 2460. 
Puffen,^^n to blow hard, HF. 1866. 
Pulle, s. a bout at wrestling, a throw, 

5. 164. 
Pulle, V. pluck, T. i. 210; to draw, T. ii. 

657; pulle a finc/ie, pluck a finch, cheat 

a novice, A 652; a pulled hen, a plucked 

hen, A 177. 
Pultrye, s. poultry, A 598. 
Puplisshen, pr.pl. refl.. are propagated,. 

B3. p II. 135. 
Purchacen, ger. to procure, acquire, I 

742, 1066; gain, I 1080; win, 21. 19; 

buy, A 608 ; pr. pi. promote, B 2870 ; 

imp. s. 3 p. may (He) provide, B 873; 

Purchace, imp.pl. provide (for yourself) ,^ 

T. ii. 1125. 
Purchas, s. proceeds, gifts acquired, A 

256; gain, D 1451. 1530. 
Purchasing, s. conveyancing, A 320 ; 

acquisition of property, D 1449. 
Purchasour, s. conveyancer, A 318. 
Pure, adj. very (lit, pure), A 1279; utter, 

3. 1209; the p. deth, death itself, 3. 583. 
Pure, adv. purely, 3. loio. 
Pured, //. as adj. pure, F 1560 ; very fine,^ 

D 143. 
Purfiled, pp. ornamented at the edge, 

trimmed, A 193. 
Purg-acioun, s. discharge, D 120. 
Purgen, ger. to purge, B 4143 ; pt. s. 

expiated, B 4. m 7. 4 ( Lat. piauit) ; pp. 

cleansed (by baptism), G 181. 
Purpos, s. purpose, R. 1140; design, A 

1684; to purpos, to the subject, 5. 26; // 

cam him to p., he purposed, F 606. 
Purposen, v. purpose, I 87 ; pr. pi. pro- 
pose, T. iv. 1350. 
Purpre, adj. purple, T. iv. 869. 
Purpre, s. purple, R. 1071 ; purple raiment, 

I 933- 
Purs, s. purse, A 656. 
Purse vauntes, s. pi. pursuivants, HF. 

I32I._ 

Pursuit, s. continuance, perseverance,. 

T. ii. 959; continuance in pursuit, T. ii. 

1744 ; appeal to prosecute, D 890. 
Purtreye, v. draw, A 96; pt. s. E 1600. 
Purtreyour, s. draughtsman, A 1899. 
Purveyable, adj. with provident care, 

B 3. m 2. 5. 
Purveyaunce, j.providence,A 1252,1665 ; 

foresight, D 566, 570; equipment, B 247; 

provision, A 3566, F 904; pre-arrange- 

ment, T. iii. 533; unto his p., to provide 

himself with necessaries, L. 1561. 
Purveyen, v. provide, B 2532 ; pr. s. fore- 



(§lo00arial Entjex. 



87 



sees, T. iv. 1066; /. of, provided with, 

D591. 
Purveying-e, s. providence, T. iv. 986. 
Put, s. pit, T. iv. 1540. 
Puterie, s. prostitution, I 886. 
Putours, y. pi. pimps, procurers, I 886. 
Putten, V. put, lay, 7. 344 ; v. suppose, B 

2667; Put, pr. s. puts. I 142; Put him, 

puts himself, L. 652 ; Putte, pt. s. B 1630 ; 

set, L. 675 ; p. up, put away, 2. 54. 
Pye, s. magpie, A 3950, B 1399. 
Pye, s. pie, pasty, A 384. 
Pyk, s. pike (fish), 12. 17. 
Pyke, V. (i) peep, T. iii. 60; ger. (2) to 

pick at, T. ii. 1274; pr. s. (3) makes 

(himself) tidy or smooth, E 2011. 
Pykepurs, s. pick-purse, A 1998. 
Pyled, pp. peeled, bare, bald, A 4306. 
Pyn, the pin which passes through the 

central hole in the Astrolabe and its 

plates, A. i. 14. i. 
Pyn, s. pine-tree, R. 1379. 
Pyne, s. pain, torment, T. v. 6 ; hurt, 5. 

335; toil, HF. 147; place of torment, 

HF. 1512; suffering, A 1324, 2382; woe, 

torment, B 3420; tlie passion, B 2126. 

A. S. p'ln. 
Pyne, ger. to torture, A 1746 ; pr. s. pines 

away, 7. 205 ; grieves, bemoans, I 85 ; 

pp. examined by torture, B 4249. 
PyP©, ^' pipe, musical instrument, B 2005 ; 

pi. pipes, tubes, A 2752. 
Pypen, v. pipe, whistle, A 1838 ; play on 

the bag-pipe, A 3927 ; Pype, make a 

piping noise, T. v, 1433 ; play upon a 

pipe, A 3876; pp. faintly uttered, HF. 

785 ; pres.pt. piping (hot) , hissing, A 3379. 
Pyrie, s. pear-tree, E 2217, 2325. A. S. 

pyrige. 

Q. 

Quaad, adj. evil (Flemish), A 4357; 
Quad, bad, B 1628. Du. kwaad. 

Quaille, s. quail, E 1206. 

Quake, v. tremble, shiver, R. 462; quake, 
A 3614; shake, T. iii. 542; Quook,//. .f. 
quaked, A 1576, 1762; Quaked, pp. B 
3831 ; Quaketh, imp. pi. quake, fear, T. 
ii. 302. 

Quaking, s. fear, 7. 214. 

Quakke, s. a state of hoarseness. A 4152. 

Qualm, s. pestilence, A 2014 ; evil, plague, 
R. 357 ; foreboding of death, T. v. 382. 

Quappe, V. heave, toss (lit. shake, pal- 
pitate), L. 1767 ; beat repeatedly, L. 865 ; 
palpitate, T. iii. 57. 

Quarter-night, the time when a fourth 
part of the night is gone, 9 P.M., A 3516. 



Quayles, gen. pi. quails, 5. 339. 

Queinte, adj. curious, B 1426. 

Quek ! int. quack ! 5. 499, 594. 

Quelle, V. kill, C 854; pr.pl. strike, T. iv.. 
46. 

Queme, v. please, T. 695 ; pr. pi. sub- 
serve, T. ii. 803. 

Quenche, v. put a stop to, T. iii. 846 ; be 
quenched, I 341 ; Queynte, //. s. was 
quenched, A 2334, 2337; Queynt,//". ex- 
tinguished, A 2321, 2336. 

Quene, s. queen. R. 1266. 

Querele, s. quarrel, I 618 ; //. complaints,, 
B 3. p 3. 67. 

Quern, .f. hand-mill, 9. 6; dat. B 3264. 

Questemong-eres, s.pl. questmen, jury- 
men, I 797. 

Questio, quid iuris, the question is, how 
stands the law, A 647. 

Questioun, s. dispute, A 2514; problem,. 
D 2223. 

Queynt, adj. strange, 3. 1330; curious, 
dainty, R. 65; adorned, R. 1435; well- 
devised, HF. 228; neat, R. 98; sly, A 
3275; curiously contrived, HF. 126; F 
234; hard to understand, 3. 531 ; grace- 
ful, R. 610. 

Queynte, adv. artfully, HF. 245. 

Queynte, s. pudendum, A 3276, D 332, 
444. 

Queynteliche, adv. curiously, cunningly,. 
HF. 1923; daintily, R. 569; strangely,. 
R. 783. 

Queyntise, s. finery, I 932; art, I 733; 
ornament, R. 840. 

Qui cum patre, D 1734, I 1092. The for- 
mula used at the end of a sermon. 

Qui la, who's there? B 1404. 

Quik, adj. alive, F 1336; lively, A 306;. 
rearlv, I 658. 

Quiken, v. quicken, revive, T. i. 443 ; ger. 
to grow, T. i. 295 ; to make alive, quicken, 
G 481 ; ger. to take life, burst forth, HF. 
2078 ; pt. s. burst into flame, A 2335 ; 
pp. endowed with life, F 1050. 

Quikkest, adj. super I. liveliest, busiest,. 
F 1502. 

Quiknesse, s. life, 3. 26. 

Quinible, s. shrill treble, A 3332. 

Quirboilly, s. boiled leather, B 2065. 

Quisshin, s. cushion, T. ii. 1229. 

Quistroun, s. scullion, kitchen-drudge,. 
R. 886. O. F. coistron. 

Quit, -te; see Quyte. 

Quitly, adv. freely, wholly, A 1792. 

Quod, pt. s. said, A 1234. 

Quoniam, pudendum, D 608. 

Quook, pt. s. (?/ Quake. 



ss 



(glossarial Jintjtx, 



Quyte, V. requite, reward, repay, recom- 
pense, give in return, R. 1542; 5. 112; 
10. 75; HF. 670; free, ransom, A 1032; 
^er. to remove, free, 7, 263 ; c/uyfe with, 
to requyte with, A 3119; hir cost for 
to quyte, to pay for her expenses, B 
3564; quyte hir 7vhyle, repay her time, 
i. e. her trouble, B 584; //. s. repaid, R, 
ic^'26; pt. pi. released, T. iv. 205; Quit, 
pp. rewarded, requited, HF. 1614; set 
free, G 66; discharged, quit, F 1758; as 
adj. free, F 1534. 

R. 
Raa, s. roe (Northern), A 4086, 
Raby, Rabbi, D 2187. 
Rad, -de ; see Rede. 
Radevore, s. piece of tapestry, L. 2352. 

From F. ras de Fore, serge from La 

Vaur. 
Rafles, s.p/. raffles, I 793. 
Raft, -e ; see Reve. 
Rage, J-. passion, R. 1613 ; craving, R. 1657 ; 

madness, 3. 731; L. 599; violent grief, 

F 836; violent rush, fierce blast, A 1985. 
Rag"e, V. romp, toy wantonly, A 257, 3273, 

3958. 
Rag-erye, s. wantonness, E 1847 ; passion, 

D 455- 

Raked, pp. raked, B 3323. Literally, the 
sentence is — 'Amongst hot coals he 
hath raked himself; the sense is, of 
course, ' he hath raked hot coals around 
himself.' 

Rakel, adj. rash, T. i. 1067; hasty, T. iii. 

1437- 

Rakelnesse, s. rashness, H 283. 

Rake-stele, s. handle of a rake, D 949. 
See Stele. 

Raket. s. the game of rackets, T. iv. 460. 

Rakle, v. behave rashly, T. iii. 1642. 

Ram, s. ram, L. 1427 ; (as prize at a wrest- 
ling-match), A 548; Aries, the first sign 
in the zodiac, A 8. 

Rammish, adj. ramlike, strong-scented, 
G 887. 

Rampetll, pr. s. (lit. ramps, romps, rears, 
but here) rages, acts with violence, B 
3094. We should now say — ' She Jlies 
in my face,' 

Rancour, s. ill-feeling, ill-will, malice, R, 
1261. 

Ransaked, pt. s. ransacked, came search- 
ing out, 4. 28. 

Rape, s. haste, 8. 7. Icel. hrap. 

Rape, V. ; in phrase rape and retnie, cor- 
rupted from an older phrase repen and 
riuen (A. S. hrepian and hrinan), i. e. 



handle and touch, clutch and seize, G 

1422. 
Rascaille, s. mob, T. v. 1853. 
Rated, pp. reproved, scolded, A 3463. 

Short for arated, variant of aretted; see 

Arette. 
Rathe, adv. soon, HF. 2139 ; early, A 3768. 
Rather, adj. comp. former, T. iii. 1337. 
Rather, adv. sooner, 3. 562 ; more will- 
ingly, A 487 ; the r., the sooner, 2. 82. 
Raughte ; see Reche. 
Raunson, s. ransom, A 1024. 
Rave, 2pr. pi. are mad, T. ii. 116. 
Raven, s. the constellation Corvus, HF. 

1004. 
Ravines, s. pi. rapines, thefts, I 793. 
Ravinour, s. plunderer, B 4. p 3. 117. 
Ravisshe, v. snatch away, B 2. m 7. 32; 

^o r., go and ravish, T. iv. 530; pp. rapt, 

E 1750; overjoyed, F 547; part. pres. 

snatching away, B 4. m 6. 39. 
Ravisshing, adj. swift, violent, B i. m 5. 

4; enchanting, 5. 198; destroying, B i. 

m 5. 60 (Lat. rapidos). 
Ravyne, s. ravening, greediness, 5. 336; 

ravin, prey, 5. 323; Ravines, thefts, I 

793. O. F. ravine, L. rapina. 
Ravysedest, 2/. s.pt. didst draw (down) , 

B 1659. 
Rayed, pp. striped, 3. 252. 
Real, adj. royal, regal, T. iii. 1534; L. 214, 

284, 1605. 
Realtee. s. rovalty, sovereign power, 10. 

60. 
Reaume, s. realm, kingdom, L. 2091. 
Rebekke. s. old woman, dame, D 1573. 
Rebel, adj. rebellious, A 833, 3046. 
Rebelling-, s. rebellion, A 2459. 
Rebounde, v. return, T. iv. 1666. 
Rebuked, pp. snubbed, I 444. 
Recche (i), v. reck, care, lieed, 5.593; is 

7iought to r., no matter for, T. ii. 434; 

pr. s. recks, cares, A 2397 ; Recche of it, 

care for it, pr. pi. F 71 ; it recche, pr. s. 

subj. may care for it, T. iv. 630; Roghte, 

pt. s. recked, cared, regarded, 3. 887; 

iwpers. he cared, L. 605 ; Roughte,//. s. 

recked, cared, T. i. 496. 
Recche {Q),pr. s. subJ. interpret, expound, 

B 4086. 
Recchelees, adj. careless, reckless, R. 

340; regardless, HF. 668. 
Recchelesnesse, s. recklessness, I iii, 

611. 
Receit, s. receipt, i. e. recipe for making 

a mixture, G 1353. 
Rechased, pp. headed back, 3. 379. 
Reche, v. reach, give, hand over, 3. 74; 



#l0ssarinl InOtx. 



89 



Raughte, pt. s. reached, A 3696 ; reached 
up to, A 2915 ; reached (out, or forward), 
A 136; proceeded, T. ii. 446; Reighte, 
//. s. reached, touched, HF. 1374. 

Reclaiming', s. enticement, L. 1371. 

Reclayme, v. reclaim (as a hawk by 
a lure), i. e. check, H 72. 

Recomaunde, v. recommend, T. ii. 1070. 

Recomende, ^er. to commit, G 544. 

Recomforte, £-er. to comfort again, T. ii. 
1672. 

Recompensacioun, s. recompense, HF. 
665. 

Reconciled,//, re-consecrated, I 965. 

Reconforte, v. comfort again, A 2852, B 
2168. 

Record, s. report, D 2049 ; testimony, 

3- 934- 
Recorde, v. witness, bear in mind, A 

1745; remember, T. V. 445; (to) record, 

recording, 5. 609; Recorde, I'pr. s, bring 

(it) to your remembrance, A 829. 
Recours, s. recourse, B 2632 ; resort, T. ii. 

1352; zvo/ have my r., will return, F 75; 

pi. oibits, B I. m 2. 14. 
Recovere, v. regain, T. iv. 406. 
Recoverer, s. recovery, 22. 3. O. F. re- 

covrier, recoverer. 
Reddour, s. violence, vehemence, 10. 13, 
Rede, v. read, A 709; advise, counsel, L. 

2217 ; interpret, 3. 279 ; Ret, pr. s. 

advises, T. ii. 413 ; Redeth,/r. s. advises, 

T. iv. 573 ; Redde, pt. s. read, D 714, 

721 ; interpreted, 3. 281 ; Raddf^, pt. s. 

read, T. ii. 1085 ; D 791 ; advised, 5. 579; 

Red,//, read, 3. 224; Rad,//. read, B 

4311- 
Rede, dat. counsel, T. iv. 679; see Reed. 
Rede, adj. red ; see Reed. 
Rede, adj. made of reed ; referring to 

a musical instrument in which the 

sound was produced by the vibration of 

a reed, HF. 1221. 
Rede, s. red (i. e. gold), T. iii. 1384; the 

blood, B 356; red wine, C 526, 562. 
Redelees, adj. without counsel ; not 

knowing which way to turn, 2. 27. 
Redely, adv. soon, HF. 1392; readily, 

truly, HF. 1127. 
Redoute, v. fear, B i. p 3. 21. 
Redoutinge, s. reverence, A 2050. 
Redresseth, pr. s. amends, I 1039 ; pr. pi. 

reji. erect (themselves) again, rise again, 

T. ii. 969; Redressed, //. s. reasserted, 

vindicated, F 1436; Redresse, imp. s. 

reform, i. 129; Redressed, //. roused, 

B 4. p 2. 139. 
Reducen, v. sum up, B 3. p 8. 61. 



Redy, adj. ready, A 21, 352; dressed, F 
387 ; at hand, 2. 104. 

Reed, s. counsel, advice, plan, A 1216, 
3527 ; profit, help, remedy, 3. 203 ; 
counsel, adviser, A 665 ; / can no r., 
I know not what to do, 3. 1187; without 
reed, helpless, 3. 587 ; to rede, for a 
counsel ; best to rede, best for a counsel, 
best to do, T. iv. 679 {not a verb). 

Reed, adj. red, A 153; (of the com- 
plexion), 3. 470; Rede, adj. def. red, 
A 957; indef. {rare), L. 2589; Rede,//. 
I. 89. 

Reed, s. redness, L. 533. 

Reed, imp. s. read, H 344. 

Reednesse, s. redness, G 1097. 

Rees, s. great haste, T. iv. 350. 

Refect,//, restored, B 4. p 6. 414. 

Refere, v. return, T. i. 266; Referred,//, 
brought back, B 3. p 10. 180. 

Refiguringe,/r^j-. //. reproducing, T. v. 

473- 
Refreininge, s. refrain, burden, R. 749. 
Refreyden, v. grow cold, T. v. 507; 

Refreyd, cooled down, 12. 21. 
Refreyn, s. refrain, T. ii. 1571. 
Refreyne, v. bridle, curb, I 385. 
Refresshinge. s. renewing, I 78. 
Reft, -e ; see Reve. 

Refus,//. as adj. refused, rejected, T. i.570. 
Refut, s. place of refuge, refuge, i. 14; 

safety, i. 33. 
Regals. //. royal attributes, L. 2128. 
Regalye, s. rule, authority, 2. 65. 
Regard ; to the r. of, in comparison 

with, B 2. p 7. 126 ; at r. of, 5. 58. 
Registre, s. narrative, A 2812. 
Regne, s. kingdom, dominion, realm, A 

866; dominion, rule, A 1624. 
'Regnen, pr. pi. reign, 4. 50. 
Reherce, v. rehearse, repeat with exacti- 
tude, A 732; ^er. to enumerate, I 239; 

recount, B 89. 
Rehersaille, s. enumeration, G 852. 
Rehersing, s. rehearsal, A 1650; recital, 

L. 1 185. 
Reighte, //. s. reached, touched, HF. 

1374. Pt. t. of reche. 
Reines, s. pi. rain-storms, HF. 967. 
Rejoye. v. rejoice, T. v. 395. 
Rejoyse, ^er. to make rejoice, i. loi ; feel 

glad, T. V. 1165. 
Rekene, ^er. to reckon, A 401. 
Rekening, s. reckoning, account, 3. 699; 

A 600. 
Reketh./r. s. reeks, smokes, L. 2612. 
Rekever, 1 pr. s. {for future), (I) shall 

retrieve, do away, HF. 354. 



D4 



90 



(^lossai'ial hxtitx. 



Rekke, i/r. s. care, C 405, E 1090 ; pr. s. 
iinpers. (it) recks (him), he cares, L. 
365 ; yoTU r., you reck, 7. 303 ; what r. 
Die, wliat do I care, D 53. 

Rekne. v. reckon {also 1 pr. j.), A 1933. 

Relayes, s. pi. fresh sets of hounds, re- 
serve packs, 3. 362. 

Relees, s. release, i. 3 ; ceasing ; out of 
/■flees, without ceasing, G 46. 

Relente, v. melt, G 1278. 

Relesedest, 2 //. s. forgavest, I 309; 
Relessed,//. s. forgave, B 3367. 

Relesing", s. remission, I 1026. 

Releve, ger. to raise up, relieve, T. v. 
1042 ; pp. restored, I 945 ; Releved, pp. 
revived, L. 128 ; recompensed, A 4182 ; 
made rich again, G 872. 

Relevinge, s. remedy, I 804. 

Relig-ioun, s. religion, A 477 ; state of 
religion, life of a nun, R. 429 ; a re- 
ligious order, B 3134; the religious 
orders, B 3144. 

Religious, adj. belonging to a religious 
order, B 3150; devoted to a religious 
order, T. ii. 759 ; as s., a monk or nun, 
I 891. 

Relik, s. relic, L. 321. ""-_ ^^' 

Reme. s. realm, B 1306, 

Remede. s. remedy, T. i. 661. 

Remedies, pi. (Ovid's) Remedia Amoris, 
3- 56^- 

Remembre, v. remember, I 135 ; pr. pi. 
remind, ¥ 1243; pr. s. recurs to the 
mind, 4. 150; Remembringe him, call- 
ing to remembrance, T. ii. 72. 

Remenant, s. rem.ainder, rest, A 888. 

Remeve, v. remove, T. i. 691. 

Remorde, //■. s. subj. cause (you) remorse, 
T. iv. 1491 ; pr. s. vexes, plagues, 
troubles, B 4. p 6. 293. 

Remors, s. remorse, T. i. 554. 

Remounted, //. comforted, B 3, p i. 9. 

Remiuable (i), adj. changeable, variable, 
T. iv. 1682. 

Remuable (2), adj. capable of motion 
(Lat. mobilibus'), B 5. p 5. 37. 

Remuen, v. remove, B 2. p 6. 55. 
aiiiouebis?) 

Ren, s. run, A 4079. 

Renably, adv. reasonably, D 1509. 

Rende, v. rend, T. iv. 1493; Rent, pr. s. 
rt^nds, tears, L. 646 a; Rente, pt. s. tore, 
A 990. 

Rending-, s. tearing, A 2834. 

Renegat, s. renegade, apostate, B 932. 

Reneye, v. deny, renounce, abjure, B 

376, 3751- 
Reneyinge, s. denying, I 793. 



(Lat. 



Renged, //. ranged, placed in rows, R. 
1380. 

Rehges, pi. ranks, A 2594. 

Renne (i), v. run, I 721; ^er. A 3890; 
//-. s. runs, D 76; is current, E 1986; 
approaches quickly, T. ii. 1754; goes 
easily, A. i. 2. i ; arises, L, 503 ; spreads, 
L. 1423 ; renneth for, runs in favour of, 
B 125; Ronnen, pt. pi. ran, A 2925, 
3827; Ronnen, //. advanced, lit. run, 
R. 320; is r., has run, has found its 
way (into), HF. 1644. 

Renne (2), v.; only in the phrase, rape 
and renne, G 1422. See Rape. 

Renomed, pp. renowned, B 3. p 2. 124. 

Renomee, s. renown, L. 1513. 

Renoun, s. renown, fame, 2. 88, 

Renovelances, s. pi. renewals, HF. 693. 

Renovelle, v. renew, B 3035 ; are re- 
newed, I 1027. 

Rente, s. revenue, income, A 256; pay- 
ment, tribute, 3. 765 ; to r., as a tribute, 
T. ii. 830. 

Repair, s. resort, repairing, B 1211, D 
1224. 

Repaire, ^^r. to go home, B 1516; to 
repair, find a home, T. iii. 5 ; to go 
back (to), HF. 755 ; v. return, F 589. 

Reparaciouns, //. reparations, makings 
up, HF. 688. 

Repentaunce, s. penitence, A 1776. 

Repentaunt, adj. penitent, A 228. 

Repenting, s. repentance, L. 147. 

Repeyre, v. repair, return, T. v. 1571. 

Repleccioun, s. repletion, B 4027. 

Repleet. adj. replete, full, B 4147. 

Replenissed, //. filled, I 1079. 

Replicacioun, s. reply, A 1846; involu- 
tion, B 3. p 12. 170. 

Replye, v. object, E 1609. 

Reporte, v. relate, tell, C 438. 

Reportour, s. reporter, A 814. (The host 
is so called because he receives and 
remembers the tales ; they were all 
addressed to him in particular. Thus 
' reporter' has here almost the sense of 
' umpire.') 

Reprehencioun, s. reproof, T. i. 684. 

Reprehende, v. reproach, T. i. 510 ; pr.pl. 
blame, criticise, B 3. p 12. 134. 

Repressed.//, kept under, L. 2591. 

R6prevdble, adj. reprehensible, C 632; 
r. to, likely to cast a slur on, 15. 24. 

Repreve, s. reproof, B 2413 ; shame, C 
595 ; reproach, E 2206. 

Repreve, v. reproach, F 1537 ; reprove, H 
70. 

Reproved, pp. as adj. blamed, accused, 



(glo00arial Mtizx, 



91 



R. 1135; Repioeved, //. stultified, B 2. 
p 6. 127. 
Repugnen, ^er. to be repugnant (to), B 

5- P 3- 6- 
Requerable, adj. desirable, B 2. p 6. 32. 
Requeren, v. entreat, seek, B 2927 ; ask, 

D 1052 ; p/>. necessitated, T. iii. 405. 
Resalg-ar, s. realgar, G 814. ' Realgar, a 

combination of sulphur and arsenic, of 

a brilliant red colour as existing in 

nature^; red orpiment ; ' Webster. 
Resceived, pp. received ; vvel resceived, 

favourably situated with respect to other 

planets, &c. ; A. ii. 4. 51. 
Rescous, s. a. rescue, help, T. iii. 1242 ; A 

2643- 
Rescowe, v. (to) rescue, save, T. 111. 857 ; 

rescue, T. v. 231. 

Rescowing-e, s. rescuing, I 805. 

Rese, ger. to shake, A 1986. 

R^sembl^ble, adj. alike, R. 985. 

Resolven, pr. pi. fiow out, B 5. m i. i ; 
Resolved, //. dissolved, melted, B 2. p 7. 
164. 

Resonable. adj. talkative, 3. 534. 

Resort, s. resource, T. iii. 134. 

Resoun, s. reason, right, A 37, 847; 
argument, speech, sentence, T. i. 796. 

Res6uneth, /r. s. resounds, A 1278. 

Resport, s. regard, T. iv. 86, 850. 

Respyt, s. delay, B 948 ; respite, delay, 
reprieve, G 543 ; withoute more respyt, 
without delay, forthwith, R. 1488; out 
of more respyt, without any delay, with- 
out any hesitation, T. v. 137. 

Respyte, ger. to hesitate, 7. 259. 

Reste, s. rest, repose, F 355 ; at reste, at 
rest, fixed, T. ii. 760; at his reste, as in 
its home, 5. 376; to reste, (gone) to rest, 
A 30 ; Restes, pi. times of repose, T. ii. 
1722. 

Reste, V. remain (with) , T. iii. 1435 ; rest, 
repose, T. ii. 1326. 

Restelees. adv. restlessly, R. 370. 

Resurreccioun, s. resurrection, i. e. re- 
opening (of the daisy), L. no. 

Ret, for Redeth, pr. s. advises, T. ii. 

413- 
Retenue, s. retinue, troop of retamers, 

suite, A 2502; E 270; at his r., among 

those retained by him, D 1355. 
Rethor, s. orator, B 4397, F 38. 
Rethorien, adj. rhetorical, B 2. p i. 46. 
Rethorien {written Retorien), s. orator, 

B 2. p 3. 61. 
Retorneth, pr. s. brings back, B 5. p 6. 

301 ; pres.pt. revolving, T. v. 1023. 
Retourning'e, s. return, A 2095. 



Retracciouns, s. pi. retractions, things 

which I withdraw, I 1085. 
Retreteth, pr. s. reconsiders, B 5. ni 3. 

57- 
Retrograd, adj. moving in a direction 

contrary to that of the sun's motion in. 

the ecliptic, A. ii. 4. 53. 
Reule, s. rule, A 173. 
Reulen, v. rule, B 4234; Reule hir, guide 

her conduct, E 327. 
Reuthe, s. ruth, 1. 127. 
Reve, s. reeve, steward, bailiff, A 542, 

3860. 
Reve, ger. to rob (from), T. iv. 285; to 

take away, G 376 ; to r. ;/<? man fro his 

lyf to take away no man's life, L. 2693 ; 

Reven, ger. to reave, plunder, I 758 ; to 

bereave, T. i. 188; Reveth, /r. j'. forces 

away, 5. 86; Ralte, pt. s. bereft, D 888; 

reft, B 3288; Refte, pt. s. bereft, HF. 

457; Raft, pp. torn, reft, T. v. 1258; 

taken from, L. 2590; bereaved, F 1017. 
Revel, s. revelry, sport, A 2717; min- 

strelsv, A 4402. 
Revelour, s. (the) Reveller, A 4371 ; a 

reveller, A 4391. 
Revelous, adj. fond of revelry, B 1194. 
Reverberacioun, s. vibration, D 2234. 
Reverdye, s. rejoicing, R. 720. O. F. 

reverdle, ' feuillee, verdure; joie, all6- 

gresse ; ' Godefroy. 
Reverence, s. respect, A 141 ; respectful 

manner, A 305 ; fear, 1 294 ; thy r., the 

respect shewn to thee, B 116. 
Revers, s. reverse, contrary, 18. 32. 
Revesten, pr. pi. clothe again, T. iii. 

353- 
Revoken. ger. to recall, T. iii. 1118. 
Revolucioun, j. revolving course (orbit), 

4. 30. 
Reward, s. regard, attention, T. ii. 1133, 

V. 1736 ; having r. to, considering, 5. 426 ; 

take r. of, have regard, I 151. 
Rewde, adj. plain, unadorned, A. pr. 49. 
Rewe, s. row, line, A 2866 ; by reive, in 

order, D 506. 
Rewe, ger. to have pity, A 2382 ; be sorry, 

T. ii. 455 ; do penance for, G 447 ; pr. 

s. impers. makes (me) sorry, I am sorry, 

A 3462, B 4287. 
Rewel-boon, s. (probably) ivory made 

from the teeth of whales, B 2068. 
Rewful, adj. lamentable, sad, L. 1838 ; 

sad (one), B 854. 
Rewfulleste, adj. sup. most sorrowful, A 

2886. 
Rewfully, adv. sadly, T. iii. 65. 
Rewle, s. the revolving long and narrow 



92 



(§lo00arial Entiei. 



plate or rod used for measuring and 

taking altitudes, A. i. i. 6 ; it revolves at 

the back of the Astrolabe ; //. rules, A. 

pr. 44. 
Rewledest, 2 pr. s. didst control, B i. p 

4. 238. 
Rewliche, adj. pitiable, B 2. p 2. 67. 
Re"Wine, s. realm, R. 495. 
Rewthe, s. ruth, pity, E 579; a pitiful 

sight, E 562. 
Rewthelees, adj. ruthless, unpitying, 5. 

613; 6. 31. 
Reye, s. rye, D 1746. 
Reyes, //. round dances, HF. 1236. Mid. 

Du. reye, ' a round daunce ' : Hexham. 
Reyn, s. rain, A 492; storm of rain, A 

35^7' 
Reyne, s. rein, A 4083. 
Reyne, v. rain down, T. v. 1336; rain, 4. 

287. See Ron. 
Reynes, s.pl. loins, I 863. 
Reyse, ^er. to build up, D 2102; r. up, to 

exact, ' realise,' D 1390. 
Reysed, pp. gone on a military expedi- 
tion, A 54. O. F. reise, ' expedition 

militaire, incursion sur une terre enne- 

mie ; ' Godefroy. 
Rhetorice, Rhetoric, B 2. p i. 48. 
Riban, s. as pi. ribbons, HF. 1318. 
Ribaninges, //. silk trimmings, borders, 

R. 1077. 
Ribaudye, s. ribaldry, ribald jesting, A 

3866, C 324. 
Ribible, s. rebeck, lute with two strings, 

A 4396. 
Ribybe, s. term of reproach for an old 

woman, D 1377. 
Riche, adj. pi. rich people, A 248. 
Richely, adv. richly, F 90. 
Richesse, s. riches, wealth, D mo, 1118; 

Richesses, pi. wealth, riches, B 2560. 
Rideled, pp. plaited, gathered in (at the 

neck, or waist), R. 1235, 1243. Ridele, 

plisse ; ' Godefroy. 
'BJiden, pt. pi. and pp. rode, ridden. 
Riet, 'rete,' A. i. 3. 5. The 'rete' or 

' net ' is the circular plate with many 

openings which revolves within the 

' mother.' 
Right, adj. straight, upright, R. 1701 ; 

right, I. 75; voc. own, F 1311. 
Rig-ht, adv. just, exactly, A 257, 535 ; 

wholly, C 58 ; even, B 2173 ; Right that, 

that very thing, 3. 1307. 
Right, s. I. 21; by right, justly, B 44; ^Jy 

alle r., in all justice, T. ii. 763; at alle 

rightes, in all respects, fully, A iioo. 
Rightful, adj. perfect; rightful age, (in) 



her prime, R. 405 ; just, i. 31 ; righteous, 

5. 55 ; lawful, I 744. 
Rightwis, adj. righteous, just, L. 905. 
Right wisnesse, $. righteousness, C 637, 

D 1909; justice, 14. 8. 
Rikne, imp. s. reckon, compute, A. ii. 27. 

10. See Rekene. 
Rinde, s. rind, bark, T. iv. 1139; hard 

skin, T. ii. 642. 
Ring, 5. ring, F 83; concourse, L. 1887; 

lyk r., i. e. in ringlets, A 2165. 
Ringe, v. make to resound, A 2431 ; ring, 

resound, T. ii. 233 ; Rong, //. 5. rang, 5. 

492; Ronge, />/. T. ii. 805. 
Riot, s. riotous conduct, gaming, A 4395, 

4392. 
Riote, V. riot, gamble, A 4414. 
Risen, pp. of Ryse. 
Risshe, s. rush, T. iii. ii6i. 
Rist, pr. s. of Ryse. 
Ritj/r. 5. of Ryde. 
Riveer, s. river, B 1927. 
Robbour, s, robber, B 3818. 
Roche, s. rock, F 500; pi. HF. 1035. 
Rode, s. complexion, A 3317, B 1917. 
Rode, s. nom. rood, cross, HF. 57. 
Rode-beem, s. rood-beam, D 496. (A 

beam across the entrance to the choir of 

a church, supporting a rood or cross.) 
Rody, adj. ruddy, F 385, 394. 
Roes, pi. of Roo. 
Roggeth (Ruggeth), pr. s. shakes, L. 

2708. I eel. rugga. 
Roket, s. rochet, tunic, R. 1240, 1242, 

1243. An outer garment, usually of 

fine white linen. 
Rokke, s. rock, L. 2195. 
Rokken, ger. to rock, A 4157. 
RoUe, s. roll, C 911. 
RoUen, ger. to roll, revolve, T. ii. 659 ; 

//. s. revolved, D 2217 ; //. much talked 

of, T. V. 1061. 
Romaunce, s. romance, T. iii. 980. 
Rombled, pt. s. fumbled, moved about 

with his hands, groped about, G 1322. 
Rombled, pt. s. buzzed, muttered, B 

3725. 
Romen, v. roam, wander, A 1099 ; Romed, 

pt. s. A 1065, 1069 ; //. gone, L. 1589. 
Ron, //. s. rained, T. iii. 640, 677. A. S. 

ran, pt. s. rained. 
Rond, adj. round, circular, A. ii. 38. i. 
Rong, -e; see Ringe. 
Ronges, pi. rungs, rounds of a ladder, A 

3625. A. S. hrung. 
Ronne, -n; see Renne. 
Roo, s. roe, 5. 195 ; Roes, pi. roes, R. 1401. 
Rood, pt. s. of Ryde. 



(glossarial Jlntiex. 



93 



Roof, //. s. of Ryve. 

Roon, s. rose-bush, R. 1674. Halliwell 
gives roan, a clump of whins, as a 
Northumberland word ; and we find 
the spelling ranes in the allit. Morte 
Arthure, 923. 

Rocs, pt. s. of Ryse. 

Roost, s. roast meat, A 206. 

Ropen, pp. reaped, L. 74. 

Rore, s. uproar, T. v. 45. 

Rore, ger. to roar, T. iv. 373; pr. s. re- 
sounds, A 2881. 

Roring", s. loud lament, E 2364. 

Rose, s. rose, R. 1700; ger. of the rose, A 
1038. 

Rose-leef , s. rose-leaf, R. 905. 

Rose-garlond, s. garland of roses, HF. 

135- 

Rosen, adj. made of roses, R. 845 ; Ro- 
sene, adj. def rosy, B 2. m 8. 6. 

Roser, s. rose-bush, R. 1651, 1659; I 858. 

Rose-reed, adj. red as a rose, G 254. 

Roste, V. roast, A 383 ; pp. A 147. 

Rosy hewed, of rosy hue, T. ii. 1198. 

Rote, J', (i) root, A 2, 423; the radix, fun- 
damental principle, G 1461 ; source, 
B 358; i. e. foot, E 58; on rote, firmly 
rooted, T. ii. 1378 ; herte rote, bottom 
of the heart, D 471 ; (2) root, the tabu- 
lated number written opposite a given 
fixed date, A. ii. 44. 2 ; the ' epoch ' of 
a nativity, B 314. 

Rote, s. rote; by rote, by rote, by heart, 
A 327, B 1712. 

Rote, s. a musical stringed instrument, 
a kind of fiddle, of Celtic origin ; said 
to be a fiddle with three strings, A 236. 
O. F. rote, from O. H. G. hrotta, rotta. 
Low Lat. chrotta ; of Celtic origin, from 
O. Irish crot (Gael, cruit, W. crwth) ; 
whence also E. crowd. 

Rotelees, adj. rootless, T. iv. 770. 

Roten, adj. rotten, A 3873 ; corrupt, filthy, 

I 139- 

Roten-herted, adj. rotten-hearted, I 
689. 

Rotie. pr. s. subj. render rotten, A 4407. 

Roughte ; see Recche. 

Rouketh, pr. s. cowers, crouches, is hud- 
dled up, A 1308. 

Roule, V. gad (lit. roll), D 653. 

Roum, adj. roomy, spacious, A 4126. 

Roum, s. room, spare, L. 1999. 

Roumer, adj. larger, A 4145. 

Rouncy, s. a hackney, nag, A 390. 

Rounde, adv. roundly, i. e. easily, with 
an easy (not jerky) motion, B 2076; 
melodiously, C 331. 



Rounded,//, s. stood out in a rounded 

form, A 263. 
Roundel, s. roundel, roundelay, a kind 

of poem, A 1529; a small circle, HF. 

791, 798. 
Roundnesses, pi. orbs, orbits, B 4. m 

6. 52. 
Roune, v. whisper, B 2025; ger. D 1572; 

pt. s. HF. 2044. A. S. runian. 
Route, s. company, rout, troop, band, 

train, A 622, 889, 2153 ; number, R. 1667 ; 

flock, R. 909 ; pi. T. ii. 620. 
Route (i), V. roar, T. iii. 743; murmur, 

HF. 1038; ger. to snore, 3. 172; /;•. s. 

snores, A 3647. A. S. hrutan. 
Route (2), V. assemble in a company, B 

540. 
Routhe, s. pity, ruth, compassion, mercy, 

F 1261, 1349; lamentation, L. 669; a 

pity, a sad thing, A 914. 
Routhelees, adj. ruthless, pitiless, B 

863. 
Routing", s. snoring, A 4166, 4214; whiz- 
zing noise, HF. 1933. 
Ro"we, s. row, 3. 975 ; line, HF. 448 ; by r., 

in a row, T. ii. 970; Rowes, //. rays, 

beams (of light), 4. 2. 
Rowe, adv. roughly, angrily, G 861. 
Rowed, pp. rowed, T. i. 969. 
Rowm, adj. roomy, large, wide, A. i. 

2-3- 
Rowne, ger. to whisper, T. iii. 568. 
Rowthe, s. ruth, pity, 3. 465; sorrow, 

3-97- 
Royaltee, s. royalty, E 928. 
Royleth, pr. s. meanders, wanders, B i. 

m 7. 10. 
Royne, s. roughness, R. 553. 
Roynous, adj. rough, R. 988. 
Rubbe, V. rub out, 8. 6. 
Rubee, s. ruby, HF. 1362. 
Rubible, s. ribibe, rebeck, A 3331. 
Rubifying", s. rubefaction, reddening, G 

797- 
Rubriche, s. rubric, D 346. 
Ruby. s. ruby, 12. 4. Rubies,//. 4. 246. 
Ruddok, s. redbreast, robin, 5. 349. 
Rude, adj. harsh, R. 752; poor, E 916; 

inhospitable, H 170; of humble birth, 

D 1 172. 
Rudeliche, adv. rudely, A 734. 
Rudenesse, s. boorishness, T. iv. 1677; 

rusticity, E 397. 
Ruggy, adj. rough, A 2883. 
Rule, iinp.pl. regulate, order, I 592; //. 

as adj. well-mannered, L. 163. 
Rum, ram, ruf; nonsense words, to 

imitate alliteration, I 43. 



94 



(filogisarial Enbex. 



Runabel, s. rumbling noise, A 1979 ; 

rumour, E 997. 
Rumbletli, />/-. s. moves to and fro with 

an indistinct murmuring noise, HF. 

1026. 
Rumblinge, s. noise, D 2133. 
Rused, //. s. roused herself, rushed away, 

3- 381. 

Russhing-, pres. pt. rushing, A 1641. 

Ruste, ger. to rust, A 502 ; pr. s. subj. 
rust, A 500. 

Rusty, adj. rusty, A 618 ; besmirched as 
with rust, R. 159. 

Ryal, adj. royal, i. 144; Rial, 2. 59. 

Ryde, v. ride, A 27, 94, 102 ; ride at 
anchor, L. 968; Ryden,^^/-. {wlthowX), 
to go on expeditions, A 45 ; Ryde, ger. 
[with out), to ride abroad to inspect, B 
1255; (see Outrydere) ; Rydestow, 
ridest thou, D 1386 ; Rit, pr. s. rides, 
-A 974; Rood,//, s. rode, A 169; RIden, 
I pt pi. (we) rode, A 825 ; pt. pi. C 968 ; 
Riden,//. ridden, B 1990. 

Ryding", s. jousting, or riding in proces- 
sion, A 4377. 

Rym, s. rime (usually misspelt rhyme), 
B 2115, 2118; Ryme, dat. HF. 623; a 
tale in verse, B 1899; verse, D 1127; 
//. B 96. A. S. rim. 

Ryme, v. describe in verse, put into rime 
{or rhyme), A 1459, B 2122. 

Rymeyed, //. rimed, or rhymed, F711; 
see above. 

Ryming, s. riming, or rhyming, verse- 
making, B 2120; the art of riming, B 
48. 

Ryot, s. riotous living, C 465. 

Ryotour, s. roysterer, C 692. 

Rys, s. spray, branch, twig, R. 1015 ; A 
3324. A. S. h7-ls. 

Ryse, ger. to rise, A 33 ; to get up, F 375 ; 
Rist,/r. s. rises, A 3688, 4193; arises, T. 
i. 944; Roos, ipt. s. rose, 2. 17; pt. s. A 
823; Risen,//. A 1065; Riseth, «>;//. //. 
I 161. 

I^y ve, ger. to pierce, T. v, 1560 ; v. thrust, 
L. 1793; pierce, C 828; tear, E 1236; 
Roof, //. s. rove, rived, pierced, L. 66l, 
1351. Icel. r'l/a. 

S. 

Sable, s. sable, black, 4. 284. 
Sachels, s. pi. bags, B i. p 3. 83. 
Sacrement, s. the eucharist, I 582. 
Sacrifye, v. do sacrifice, L. 1348. 
Sacrifyse, s. sacrifice, L. 13 10. 
Sacrileg-e, s. I 801 ; sorcery, B i. p 4. 
282. 



Sad, adj. stable, firm, I 129, 310; staid, 
A 2985 ; sober, E 220, 237 ; fixed, con- 
stant, unmoved, settled, E 693, 754; 
sad, R. 211; devoted, 23. 9; trusty, 
H 275; serious, grave, 3. 918; calm, 
settled, G 397; staid, L. 1581, 1876; 
earnest, HF. 2089; Sadde, //. grave, 
E 1002 ; steady, 3. 860 ; discreet, B 135 ; 
sure, H 258. 

Sadel, s. saddle, L. 1199. 

Sadel-bowe, s. saddle-bow, A 2691. 

Sadly, adv. firmly, A 2602; discreetly, B 
1266; steadfastly, I 124; carefully, D 
2164; firmly, tightly, E iioo; unstint- 
ingly, B 743. 

Sadnesse, s. soberness, staidness, E 1591 ; 
patience, E 452. 

Saffron with, ger. to tinge with saffron, 
to colour, C 345. 

Saffroun, s.\ like saffron = of a bright 
yellowish colour, B 1920. 

Sak, J-. sack, R. 457 ; Sakkes,//.bags,L.iii8. 

Sakked, //. put in a sack, A 4070. 

Sal, pr. s. shall (Northern), A 4043. 

Sal armoniak, s. sal ammoniac, G 798, 
824. Lat. sal armentacuni, Armenian 
salt. Sal atnmoniac, chloride of am- 
monium. The word artno?iiac certainly 
answers to the Lat. Ar^iieniacujii in the 
old treatises. Yet the right spelling is 
ammoniac. 

Sal peter, s. saltpetre, G 808. Lat. sal 
petrce, rock-salt ; nitrate of potassa ; — 
called also nitre. 

Sal preparat, s. prepared salt, G 810. 

Sal tartre, s. salt of tartar, G 810. ' Salt 
of tartar, carbonate of potash ; . . . 
first prepared from cream of tartar ; ' 
Webster. 

Salowe, adj. sallow, R. 355. (But read 
falowe.^ 

Salte, adj. def. salt, L. 1462. 

Salewe, v. salute, I 407; pr. s. B 1284; 
Salewed,//. F 1310. 

Saluing", s. salutation, A 1649. 

Saluwe, ^^r. to salute, T. iii. 1785 ; Salued, 
\pt.s. L. 315. 

Salvacioun, s. salvation, 4. 213 ; security, 
B 2361. 

Salve, s. salve, cure, T. iv. 944; //. heal- 
ing remedies, A 2712. 

Salwes, //. willow-twigs, osiers, D 655. 

Samit, s. samite, a rich and glossy silk 
material, T. i. 109 ; robe made of samite, 
R. 836, 873. 

Sang', s. song (Northern), A 4170. 

Sangwin, s. stuff of a blood-red colour, 
A 439. 



(§lo00arial intiex. 



95 



Sang"wyn, adj. very ruddy, A 2168 ; blood- 
red, A 333. 
Sans, prep, without, B 501. 
Saphires, s. pi. sapphires, B 3658. 
Sapience, wisdom, B 2184; pi. kinds of 

intelligence, G 338. 
Sarg-e. s. serge, A 2568. 
Sarpulers, s. pi. sacks made of coarse 

canvas, B i. p 3. 82. Cf. F. serpilllere. 
Sarsinesshe, adj. Saracenic, R. 1188. 

If sarsinesshe can be taken as a sb., it 

may refer to sarsnet. 
Sat ; pt. s. of Sitte. 
Satin, s. satin, 3. 253. 
Satisfaccioun, j. penance, I 87 ; resti- 
tution, I 108. 
Sauf, adj. safe, safely kept, G 950; in 

safety, 4. 197. 
Sauf, prep, save, except, A 2180. 
Saufly, adv. safely, with safety, B 2373, 

4398. 
Saugh, //. s. of See. 
Saule, s. soul (Northern), A 4187. 
Sauns, prep, without ; sauns faille, with- 
out fail, certainly, HF. 188, 429. See 

Sans. 
Sauter, s. psalter, R. 431. 
Sautrye, s. psaltery, a kind of harp, A 

296, 3213, 3305, H 268. 
Savacioun, s. salvation, T. ii. 381,563; 

withoufe any savacioun, without saving 

any, HF. 208. 
Save, s. sage (the plant), A 2713. 
Save, //•£•/. and conj. save, except, A 683 ; 

Save your grace, by your leave, B 2260. 
Saven, ger. to save, keep, i. 117; pr. s. 

siibj. may (He) save, A 3108; //.kept 

inviolate, F 531. 
Save-garde, s. safe-conduct, T. iv. 139. 
Saveour, s. saviour, 19. 16. 
Saveren, pr.pl. mind, care for, I 820. 
Savinge./r^/. except, A 2838. 
Savoringe, s. taste, I 207. 
Savorous, adj. pleasant, R. 84, 
Savory, adj. pleasant, T. i. 405. 
Savour, s. savour, D 2196 ; pleasantness, 

F 204 ; pleasure, 10. 20 ; smell, G 887 ; 

scent, R. 925 ; interest, T. ii. 269 ; //. 

odours, 5. 274. 
Savoure, v. taste, D 171 ; //-. pi. mind, 

care for, I 820; imp. s. have relish for, 

13- 5- 
Savoured, adj. perfumed, R. 547, 
Savouringe, s. tasting, I 959. 
Savourly, adj. enjoyably, A 3735. 
Sawcefleem, adj. covered with pimples 

(due to an excess of humour called 

salsa phlegma) , A 625. 



Sawe, s. saying, speech, A 1163 ; word, 

B 2925 ; discourse, G 691. 
Sawe, Say; see See. 
Sayde, said; see Seye. 
Say lours, pi. dancers (who leap in danc- 
ing) , R. 770. ' Sailleor, Sailleur, sauteur, 

dauseur ; ' Godefroy. 
Scabbe, s. scab, R. 553 ; a disease of 

sheep, C 358. 
Scalded,//, burnt, A 3853. 
Scale, s. scale, or rather, double scale, 

for measuring both by umbra recta and 

umbra versa, A. i. 12. 3. 
Scalle, s. scab, 8. 3. 
Scalled, pp. having the scall, scabby, 

scurfy, A 627. 
Scantitee, s. scantiness, I 431. 
Scantnesse, s. scarcity, I 420, 
Scapen, v. escape, T. v. 908. 
Scarlet-reed, adj. scarlet-red, B 4351. 
Scarmlshing, j. skirmish, L. 1910. 
Scarmyche, s. skirmish, T. v. 1508. 
Scars, adj. parsimonious, B 2789. 
Scarsetee, s. scarcity, B 2790. 
Scarsly, adv. parsimoniously, A 583. 
Scatered, //. scattered, G 914. 
Scathe, s. scathe, harm, misfortune, ' a 

pity,' A 446 ; Polytnites to sc, to the 

harm of P., T. v. 938. 
Scatheles, adv. harmlessly, R. 1550. 
Science, s. science, knowledge, 5, 25 ; 

learned writing, B 1666; wisdom, I 229. 
Sclat, s. slate, II. 34. 

Sclaundre, s. slander, HF. 1580; ill- 
fame, disgrace, E722; scandal, I 137. 
Sclave, s. slave, T. iii. 391. 
Sclendre, adj. slender, slight in make, 

A 587 ; thin, B 3147 ; poor, B 4023. 
Scochouns, pi. escutcheons, painted 

shields, R. 893. 
Scole, s. school, B 1685, 1694; manner, 

fashion, A 125, 3329; discipline, T. i. 

634 ; ' the schools ' ; D 2186. 
Scole-naat6re, s. subject for disputation 

in the schools, D 1272. 
Scoler, s. scholar, A 260. 
Scoleringr, s. young scholar, note to D 

44 ; line 6. 
Scole-termes,//. school-terms, E 1569. 
Scoleward; to scoleward = toward 

school, B 1739. 
Scoleye, ger. to study, A 302. 
Sconaes, s. pi. foam, lather, B 4. m 7. 61. 

Lit. ' scums.' 
Score, imp. s. notch, cut, mark, B 1606. 
Scorkleth, pr. s. scorches, shrivels, B 2. 

m 6. 28. 
Scorned, pt. s. 3. 927 ; jested at, B 4277. 



96 



(glossan'al KntJtx. 



Scorningr, s. scorn, T. i. 105. 
Scorpion, s. E 2058 ; sign of Scorpio, 

HF. 948. 
Scot, a horse's name, A 616, D 1543. 
Scourges, s.p/. whips, plagues, E 1157. 
Scourging", s. correction, 4. 42. 
Scrippe, s. scrip, bag, D 1737. , 
Scripture, s. writing, inscription (on a 

ring), T. iii. 1369; passage of writing, 

L. 1 144; //. manuscripts, A 2044. 
Scrit, s. writing, deed, E 1697 ; T. ii. 1130. 
Scrivenish, adv. like a scrivener, T. ii. 

1026. 
Scriveyn, s. scribe, 8. i. 
Seche,^<f/-. to seek, i. e. to be sought for 

(it was easily had), A 784; to seek out, 

D 909. 
Secree, ad/, secret, trusty, 5. 395 ; secret, 

B 2251 ; able to keep secrets, D 946. 
Secree, adv. secretly, F 1109. 
Secree, s. a secret, B 3211; Secree of 

secrees, secret of secrets, Lat. Secreta 

Secretorum (the name of a book), G 

1447. 
Secreenesse, s. secrecy, B 773. 
Secrely, adv. secretly, E 763. 
Secte, s. sect, company, E 1171 ; religion, 

faith (lit. ' following'), F 17. 
Seculer, s. a layman, B 4640. 
Sede, V. bear seed, 7. 306. 
See, s. sea, A 59 ; /u//e see, high tide, A. 

ii. 46. 4. 
See, s. seat, HF. 1361 ; seat of empire, B 

3339; P^- seats, HF. 1210. 
See, V. see, L. 2560; £-er. to see, look, F 

366; to look (upon), 3. 1177; as fut. 

shall see, 4. 190; Seestow, seest thou, 

HF. 911; Say, i //. s. saw, T. v. 992; 

Say, //. s. saw, B 4304; Sey, pt. j. B i, 

7; Seigh, I pt. s. saw, A 193; Seigh, 

pt. s. A 1066, F 850; Saugh, i pt. s. 

saw, A 764 ; pt. s. A 850, 1400 ; Sy, pt. s. 

G 1381; Sawe, 2 pt. s. sawest, B 848; 

Saugh, 2 pt.pl. G 1106 (with ye)\ Sawe, 

pt. pi. B 218 ; Seye, //. pi. saw, T. iv. 

720; Seyeu, pt. pi. G no; Syen, pt.pl. 

B 2879, '4568; Sye, //. pi. E 1804; pr. 

s. subj. may (he) behold or protect, B 

156; Sawe, pt. s. subj. were to see, A 

144 ; Seyn, //. seen, B 1863 ; Seye, //. 

D 552. 
Seed-foul, s. birds living on seeds, 5. 

512. 
Seek, adj. sick, ill, L. 2409, 2436; def. A 

424 ; Seke, def. as s. man in a fever, 5. 

104; Seke,/-/. A 18, 245. 
Seel (i), J. bliss, A 4239. A. S. s^l. 
Seel (2), s. seal, B 882. 



Seemlinesse, s. dignity of bearing, L. 

104 1. 

Seemly, adj. delicate, pleasing, 12. 11; 
seemly, L. 2074. 

Seestow, seest thou, HF. 911. 

Seet, pt. s. sat (false form, due to pi. 
seten), A 2075. 

Seetes,//, seats, A 2580. 

Seeth,//. s. seethed, boiled, E 227. 

Sege, s. throne, B i. p 4. 285 ; siege, L. 
1696. 

Seggen, \ pr.pl. say, T. iv. 194. 

Seigh, z^. s. o/See. 

Qeiu., ger.; That is to sein, that is to say, 
A. pr. 26. 

Seinte, adj. fern, holy, D 1824. 

Seintuarie, s. sanctuary, I 781 ; a conse- 
crated object, C 953. 

Seistow, sayest thou, A 1125. 

Seith./r. s. says, A 178. 

Seke ; see Seek, adj. 

Seke, V. search through, B 60; seek, B 
1633; ger. A 13, 510; to seek, i. e. a 
matter for search, G 874; Sekestow, 
seekest thou, T. iii. 1455; Seken to, 1 pr. 
pi. press towards, 2. 91 ; 2 //-. pi. search 
through, B 127; Soghte, i //. s. sought, 
A. ii. 45. II ; //. s. subj. were to examine^ 
C488. 

Sekernes, s. security, 7. 345. 

Sekirly, adv. certainly, L. 163 a. 

Selde, adj.pl. few, E 146. 

Selde, adv. seldom, A 1539, B 2343; 
Selden, B 2594; Seld, B 2343. 

Seled, pp. sealed, B 736. 

Seles,//, seals, T. iii. 1462. 

Selily, adv. happily, B 2. p 4. 96. 

Selinesse, s. happiness, T. iii. 813. 

Selle, s. dat. boarding, A 3822. A Kentish 
form; M. E. sulle, sille ; A. S. syll. 
{Flore = ground beneath the boards.) 

Selle, V. sell, F 1563; barter, A 278; for 
to selle, for sale, D 414 ; to selle, for sale, 
A 3821; Solde, //. s. subj. were to sell, 
R. 452. 

Selly, adj. wonderful (MSS. sely), HF. 
513. A. S. sellic, seldl'ic, strange. 

Sely, adj. happy, T. iv. 503; kind, 4. 89; 
good, B 1702; holy, B 682; innocent, 
simple, A 3404 ; poor, pitiable, T. i. 871 ; 
wretched, A 3896; hapless, L. 1254, 1336, 
A. S. s'cElig. 

Semblable, adj. like, B 2294. 

Semblaunce, s. likeness, R. 425 ; appear- 
ance, R. 145. 

Semblaunt, s. appearance, semblance, 
look, E 928, F 516 ; in hir s., apparently, 
R. 863. 



(glossarial EntiEX. 



97 



Seme, v. appear, seem, F 102; ger. to 

seem (to) , T. i. 747 ; pr. pi. ¥ 869 ; pt. s. 

(there) seemed, A 2970; impers. (it) 

seemed, A 39, E 296 ; him semed, it 

seemed to them, they supposed, F 56; 

the peple semed -■ it seemed to the 

people, the people supposed, F 201. 
Semelihede, s. seemliness, comeliness, 

R. 1 130; gracefulness, R. 777. 
Semely, adj, seemly, comely, A 751. 
Semely, adv. becomingly, A 123. 
Seines, s. pi. seams, I 622. 
Semicope, s. half-cope, short cope, A 262. 
Seming-, s. appearance, 3. 944 ; to my s., 

as it appears to me, B 1838. 
Semisoun, s. half-sound, i. e. suppressed 

sound, A 3697. 
Senatorie, s. senatorial rank, B 3. p 4. 93. 
Senatour, s. senator, L. 584. 
Sencer, s. censer, A 3340. 
Sencinge, pres. pt. censing, perfuming 

with incense, A 3341. 
Sendal, s. a thin silk, A 440. 
Sende , v. send, B 144 ; Sent, pr. 5. E 1 15 1 ; 

Sende, />/. s. sent, A 4136; Sente, pt. s. 

B 3927 ; Sendeth, imp.pl. send ye, C 614 ; 

Sente,//. s. subj. would send, B 1091. 
Sene, adj. visible, manifest, apparent, A 

134, 924, F 645. A. S. gesene, gesyne, adj. 

evident, visible. 
Sene,^<?r. to behold, to see, L. 1034; to 

look at, L. 2649 ; to look on, D 1245 ; to 

seem, L. 224; on to sene, to look on, 

I^. 2425. 
Senge, z'. singe, D 349; Seynd,//. broiled, 

B 4035- 

Sengrle, adj. single, unmarried, E 1667. 

Senith, s. (i) the zenith, A. i. 18. 4, 22. 6; 
(2) the point where a given azimuth- 
circle meets the horizon, A. i. 19. 12; 
the point of sunrise, A. ii. 31. 13. 

Sensibilitees, s. pi. perceptions, B 5. 
m 4. 8. 

Sensible, adj. perceptible by the senses, 
B 5. p 4. 212. 

Sent, -e ; see Sende. 

Sentement, s. feeling, fancy, T. ii. 13 ; 
susceptibility, T. iii. 43 ; passion, L. 69. 

Sentence, s. meaning, drift, E 2288 ; con- 
tents, C 190; subject, B 1753; opinion, 
B 113,3992; decision, 5. 530; meaning, 
sentiment, instruction, A 306, 798 ; tenor, 
theme, HF. iioo; decision, speech, 5. 
383 ; judgement, order, I 17 ; verdict, 
G 366; general meaning, I 58. 

Septemtrioun, s. north, B 3657, 

Septentrional, adj. northern, A. ii. 40. 
50; Septentrionalis,//. A. ii. 40. 36. 



Sepulcre, s. tomb, D 498. 

Sepulture, s. mode of burial, T. v. 299; 

burial, L. 2553; tomb, A 2854. 
Serchen, v. search, B 2597; pr. pi. go 

about, haunt, D 867. 
Sereyns, s.pl. sirens, R. 684. 
Sergeaunt of the Lawe, sergeant-at- 

law, A 309. 
Serie. s. process, argument, A 3067. 
Sermone, ger. to preach, speak, C 879. 
Sermoning', s. argument, A 3091 ; talk^ 

A 3597- 

Sermoun, s. discourse, L. 2025 ; T. ii. 965 ; 
tale, T. ii. 1115; pi. writings, B 87. 

Servag'e, s. servitude, thraldom, A 1946, 
B368. 

Servant, s. lover, A 1814 ; servant, D 1501. 

Servisable, adj. willing to serve, A 99; 
serviceable, E 1911 ; useful, E 979. 

Servitour, s. servant, D 2185. 

Servitute, s. servitude, E 798. 

Servyse, s. service, serving, A 250; reli- 
gious service, T. i. 315; musical per- 
formance, 3. 302, 

Sese, pr. s. subj. seize, 5. 481 ; pp. caught, 
4. 240; seised, possessed, T. iii. 445. 

Sesoun, s. season, F 1034 ; prime, R. 1678. 

Sestow, seest thou, T. iii. 46. 

Sete, s. seat, throne, B 3715, I 162. 

Sete, -n; see Sitte. 

Setewale, s. zedoary, setwall, R. 1370, 
See Cetewale. 

Sethe, V. seethe, boil, A 383. 

Sette, ger. to set, place, L. 540; setten 
a myte, care a mite, T. iii. 900 ; Sette, , 
I /r. i'. suppose, T. ii. 367 ; B2681; Sette 
cas, imagine the case, B 3041 ; 2 pr. pi, 
esteem, T. ii. 432 ; Sette, i pr. s. subj. set, 
A 3911; Set. //-. s. setteth, sets, 2. loi ; 
D 1982; cares, T. iii. 832; puts, 3. 635; 
Sette, 1 pt. s. counted, regarded, D 659; 
Sette me, placed myself, L. 115; sette 
nat a kers, accounted not worth a cress, 
A 3756; Sette at nought, counted as 
nothing, F 821; Sette him, sat down, 
C 207 ; Sette hir, sat, B 329 ; Sette her 
on knees, knelt down, B 638; Sette hem, 
seated themselves, L. 301 ; C 775 ; Setten 
hem adoun, set themselves, G 396; Set, 
//. placed, A 132,2528; put, B 440; set, 
R. 846 ; appointed, 4. 52 ; E 774 ; wholly 
devoted, 6. 100; wel set, seemly, 3. 828; 
set the wrightes cappe = made a fool of 
him, A 3143; Set, //;//. s. stake (as at 
dice), T. iv. 622. 

Seur, adj. sure, B 2642, 2953. 

Seur, adv. surely, T. iii. 1633. 

Seurly, adv. surely, B 2913. 



98 



(3laQQaxial hxUzx. 



Seurtee, s. surety, A 1604, B 243. 
Sewe, V. follow, 25. 12; ensue, B 2619, 

2692; pt s. pursued, B 4527. 
Sewes, s. pi. lit. juices, gravies ; used 

here for seasoned dishes, delicacies, 

F 67. 
Sewing, adj. conformable, in proportion, 

similar, 3. 959. Lit. ' following.' 
Sexte, sixth, HF. 1727. 
Sexteyn, s. sacristan, B 3216. 
Sey, I//. J. saw, 3. 1089; Seyn, //. seen, 

B 172, 624. See See. 
Seye, v. say, A 738 ; to be told, B 706; to 

seyn, A 284 ; for to seye, to say, A 468 ; 

this is to seyn, A 181 ; that is to seyn, A 

797; Seistow, sayest thou, B no; as 

ivho seyth, like one who says, i. e. so to 

speak, T. v. 883 ; Seggen, \ pr.pl. say, T. 

iv. 194; Seydestow, saidest thou, G 334; 

^Q\d,pp. B 49; Seyeth, imp.pl. say ye, 

A 1868. 
Seyl, s. sail, A 696, 3532. 
Seyn, pp. seen, B 1863, 4471. 
Seynd, pp. singed, i. e. broiled, B 4035. 
Seynt, s. saint, 3. 1319 ; Seynt {dissyllabic) , 

A 120, 509,687, D 1564; Seynte, saint 

(or holy), A 1721. 
Seyst, 2 pr. s. sayest, B 109 ; Seystow, 

2 />r. s, sayest thou, A 3490. 
Shaar, s. a plough-share, A 3763. 
Shad, -de ; see Shede. 
Shadwe, s. shadow, B 7, 10; shade, 3. 

426 ; scene, B 2. p 3. 89 ; Shadowe, re- 
flection, R. 1529. 
Shadwed, pp. shadowed, shaded, A 607. 
Shaft, s. wooden part of an arrow, A 

1362 ; pi. shafts of spears, A 2605. 
Shal, I pr. s. owe, T. iii. 1649 ; owe (to) , T. 

iii. 791; shall (do so), F 688; must, A 

853 ; am to be, 2. 53 ; am to (go) . G 303 ; 

Shalt, ipr.s. must go, D 1636; Shaltow, 

ipr. s. shalt thou, A 3575; Shal, pr. s. 

shall be, T. v. 833; is to be, HF. 82; 

must, is to, A 187; must (come), T. iv. 

1 106; will, L. 1276; must (do so), R. 387 ; 

owes, F 750; Sholde, x pt. s. should, 

B 56; ought (to have done so), 3. 1200; 

Sholdestow, shouldst thou, 10. 60; 

wouldst thou, D 1944; Sholde, pt. s. 

should, A 184; ought to, B 44; had to, 

E515; was to, B 3891; would, B 3627; 

Shul, I pr. pi. must, have to, B 351 ; 

must, B 1900; ShuUen, 2 pr. pi. shall, 

B 46^2; Shullen,//-. ;)/. must, A 3014. 
Shale", s. shell, HF. 1281. 
Shalmyes, pi. shawms, HF. 1218. 
Shame, s. A 503 ; Shame of his degree, 

i. e. lest it should shame his condition 



(as husband), F 752; Shames deth, 
shameful death, B 819, E 2377. 

Shamen, v. put to shame, F 1565 ; thee 
sliameth, it shames thee, thou art 
ashamed, B loi. 

Shamfast, adj. modest, shy, A 2055, C 55 ; 
shame-faced, ashamed, R. 467. 

Shamfastnesse, s. modesty, A 840; sense 
of shame, I 985. 

Shap, s. A 1889 ; privy member, I 423. 

Shapen, v. plan, devise, A 3403 ; find 
means (to do), A 809; pr. s. intends, L. 
1289; Shape, pr. pi. dispose, B 2989; 
Shapen hem, intend, F 214; Shoop, //, 
s. befel, T. ii. 61 ; devised, planned, T. i. 
207; made, gave, L. 2569; prepared for, 
E 198 ; plotted, B 2543 ; created, E 903 ; 
contrived, E 946; Shoop me, \pt. s. reji. 
addressed myself, 2. 20 ; prepared my- 
self, L. 180; Shoop him, pt. s. rejl. got 
ready, L. 625 ; determined, F 809 ; 
Shopen, pt. pi. made ready, B 2995 ; 
Shapen, pp. determined, A 1108; des- 
tined, A 1392; shaped, L. 2014 ; planned, 
B 951; prepared, B 249; appointed, B 
253; disposed (themselves), B 142; built, 
7- 357 ; cut out, T. iii. 734 ; Shape, pp. 
destined, ordained, A 1225 ; allotted, T. 
ii. 282; created, B 3099; imp.pl. reji. 
dispose yourself, B 2307. 

Shaply, adj. fit, A 372; likely, T. iv. 1452. 

Sharpe, adv. sharply, B 2073. 

Shave, v. shave, A 3326; Shaven,/'/, cut 
smooth, R. 941 ; Shave, pp. shaven, A 588. 

Shaving-, s. a thin slice, G 1239. 

Shawe, s. wood, A 4367, D 1386. 

She, she, A 446; She . . . she, one woman 
and another, T. ii. 1747. 

She-ape, s. female ape, I 424. 

Shedeth, jz>r. s. sheds, I 577 ; Shedde,//. s. 
shed, B 3447 ; Shadde, pt. s. poured, B 
3921 ; Shad,//, distributed, B i. m i. 18. 

Sheef, s. sheaf, A 104; Sheves, //. HF. 
2140. 

Sheep, s. a sheep, A 506 ; a meek person, 
D432. 

Sheld, s. shield, A 2122; //. French 
crowns (coins worth 3^'. a,d.) , A 278 ; 
Sheeld,//. B 1521. 

Shelde. pr. s. subj. may he shield, HF. 88. 

Shende, v. disgrace, T. iv. 1577 ; ruin, B 
927 ; render contemptible, T. v. 893 ; 
reproach, T. v. 1060; destroy, HF. 1016 ; 
Shent, /r. J', ruins, I 848; defiles, 1 854; 
Shente, //. s. harmed, injured, B 4031 ; 
Shente, pt. s. subj. should destroy, T. ii. 
357 ; Shent, //. spoilt, T. ii. 37 ; defeated, 
L. 652; scolded, B 1731. 



^{^lossarial hittx. 



99 



Shendshipe, s. shame, I 273. 

Shene, adj. bright, A 115 ; ghstening, R. 
127 ; fair, E 2528 ; beautiful, B 692, F 
1045. A. S. scene, scyne. 

Shene, adv. brightly, 4. 87. 

Shepe, s. hire, I 568. See Shipe. 

Shepne, s. stable, shed, A 2000. A. S. 
scyl^en. See Shipnes. 

Shere, s. pair of shears, A 2417. 

Shere, i^,u\ to shear, cut, B 3257. 

Shering-hokes, pi. shearing-hooks, con- 
trivances for severing ropes in a sea- 
fight, L. 641. 

Sherte, s. shirt, A 1566 ; chemise, T. iv. 
96. 

Shet, pp. of Shette. 

Shete, s. sheet, G 879 ; //. A 4140. 

Sheten, v. shoot, I 714; Sheteth, /;•. s. 
shoi)ts, R. 960. 

Sheter, .c. as adj. fit for shooting (lit. 
shooter), 5. 180. 

Shethe, s. sheath, R. 2066. 

Shette, V. shut, enclose, T. iii. 1549; 
shut, close, D 1141 ; Shette, pt. s. shut, 
A 3499; closed, fastened up, T. ii. 1090; 
Shetten, pt pi. shut up, enclosed, T. i. 
148 ; Shet, pp. shut, R. 529. 

Sheves, pi. sheaves, HF. 2140. 

Sheweth, pr. s. pretends, appears, B 2386 ; 
appears as, is shewn, A. i. 7. 9. 

Shifte, V. provide, distribute, ordain, D 
104; assign, G 278. 

Shilde, pr. s. subj. shield, T. ii. 1019; 
defend, B 2098; forbid, A 3427. 

Shimering-, s. glimmer, A 4297. 

Shine, s. shin, A 386. 

Shined, pt. s. shone, L. 2194. 

Ship, s. I. 16 ; Shipe, dat. (into the) ship, 
(into the) ark, A 3540. 

Shipe, s, hire, pay, reward, 7. 193; Shepe, 
hire, I 568. A. S. scipe, stipendium. 

Shipman, s. sailor, skipper, A 388, 

Shipnes, pi. stables, sheds, D 871. See 
Shepne. 

Shirreve, s. sheriff, A 359. Lit. ' shire- 
reeve.' 

Shiten, pp. defiled, dirty, A 504. 

Shitting:, s. shutting, R. 1598. 

Shivere, j. thin slice, D 1840. 

Shiveren, //•./>/. break, A 2605. 

Sho. shoe, A 253. 

Shod, pp. provided with shoes, HF. 98. 

Shode, s. parting of the hair, A 3316; the 
temple of the head, A 2007. 

Shof , pt. s. pushed, T. iii. 487. 

Shoken, pt. pi. shook, R. 363. 

Sholder-bone, s. shoulder-blade-bone, C 
350. 



Shonde, s. disgrace, HF. 88 ; B 2098. 
! Shoo, s. shoe, D 492 ; Shoos, pi. A 457 ; 

Shoon,//. B 1922. 
Shoof, pt. s. I /. shoved, pushed, R. 534; 

pt. s. drove, L. 2412. 
Shoon (sh66n),//. of Shoo. 
, Shoon (shoon),//. s. ^/Shyne. 
Shorn. //. shaven, B 3142. 
Shorte, v. shorten, D 1261 ; to shorte 

with your weye, to shorten your way 

with, A 791. 
Shortly, adv. briefly, A 30. 
Short-sholdred, adj. short in the upper 

arm, A 549. 
Shot, s. a missile, B 4539 ; arrow, A 2544. 
Shot-windo'we, s. a window containing 

a square division which opens on a 

hinge, A 3358, 3695. 
Shour, s. shower, T. iv. 751 ; onset, con- 
flict, T, iv. 47 ; //. assaults, T. i. 470. 

Cf. E. ' a shower of darts.' 
Showving-, s. shoving, pushing, H 53. 
Shredde,//. s. shred, cut, E 227. 
Shrewe, s. scoundrel, accursed wretch, 

D 284; shrew, peevish woman, E 1222, 

2428 ; planet having an evil influence, 

A ii. 4. 54; evil one, G 917. 
Shrewe, adj. evil, wicked, G 995. 
Shrewe, 1 pr. s. beshrew, curse, B 4616. 
Shrewed, adj. evil, wicked, bad, L 1545 ; 

accursed, D 54. 
Shrewedly, adv. cursedly, D 2238. 
Shrewednesse, s. wickedness, evil, B 

2721 ; cursedness, D 734; pi. evil deeds, 

I 442. 
Shrifte-fadres, pi. father-confessors, D 

1442. 
Shrighte, //. s. shrieked, A 2817; pp. T. 

v. 320. 
Shrimpes, pi. small creatures, dwarfs, 

B 3145. 

Shroud, s. robe, R. 64. 

Shrouded, //>. clad, R. 55. 

Shryked, pt. pi. shrieked, B 4590. 

Shryking, s. shrieking, T. v. 382. 

Shryned, pp. enshrined, C 955 ; canon- 
ised (ironically), 21. 15. 

Shry ve, o-er. to confess, I 129. 

Shulder-boon, s. blade-bone, I 603. 

Shuldres.//. shoulders, R. 328. 

Shull, Shullen. Shulde ; see Shal. 

Shyne, ger. to shine, 10. 62 ; Shoon, strong 
pt. s. shone, A 198 ; Shynede, weak pt. s. 
shone, L. 1119; Shined, L. 2194. 

Sib, adj. related, akin, B 2565. 

Sicamour, s. sycamore, HF. 1278. 

Sicer, s. strong drink, B 3245. 

Sig-h, I pt. s. saw, R. 818. 



lOO 



(3lo&QaxiB\ Hintitx, 



Sig-hte, pf. s. of Syke, 

Signet, s. signet-ring, T. ii. 1087. 

Signifiaunce, s. signification, R. 995 ; 

significance, HF. 17; prediction, R. 16. 
Signijicavit, a writ ot excommunication, 

A 662. 
Sik, adj. sick, ill, A 1600. 
Siker, adj. sure, A 3049, B 4353 ; safe, 

G 864; certain, G 1047; sure, steady, 

D 2o6g ; in security, 17. 28. 
Siker, adv. uninterruptedly, T. iii. 1237 ; 

surely, T, ii. 991. 
Sikered,//. assured, L. 2128. 
Sikerer, adj. surer, more to be trusted, 

B 4043. 
Sikerly, adv. certainly, surely, truly, A 

137- 
Sikernesse, s. security, safety, confi- 
dence, B 425; state of security, T. ii. 

773- 

Sikly, adv. ill, with ill will, E 625. 

Silver, s. money, A 232, 713. 

Silver, adj. silvery, A 1496. 

Similitude, s. comparison ; hence, pro- 
position, statement, G 431 ; sympathy, 
likeness, F 480 ; one like himself, A 3228, 

Sinaphonye, s. a kind of tabor, B 2005. 

Simple, adj. modest, R, 1014; innocent, 
3. 861. 

Simplesse, s. Simplicity (personified), 
_R. 954. 

Sin, conj. and adv. since, 4. 273. 

Singe, V. sing, A 236 ; Singestow, singest 
thou, H 244; Song, \ pt. s. sang, 3. 1158 ; 
Songe, 2 pt. s. didst sing, H 294 ; Song, 
pf. s. A 1055 ; Songen, pf.p/. sang, F 55 ; 
Songe, pt. s. subj. were to sing, 3. 929 ; 
Songen, pp. sung, T. v. 645 ; Songe, pp. 
A 266 ; recited, T. v. 1797. 

Singularitees, s. pi. separate parts, par- 
ticulars, B 5. m 3. 45. 

Singuler, adj. particular, B 2. p 7. 64; 
single, I 300; a single, G 997; private, 
B 2625 ; sinj^ular profyte, special advan- 
tage, HF. 310. 

Singulerly, adv. singly, B 4. p. 6. 'j'j. 

Sinne, s. sin, A 561. 

Sinwes, s. pi. sinews, I 690. 

Sippe, V. sip, taste, D 176. 

Sire, sir, my master, A 355 ; Sires, gen. 
sire's, father's, i. e. Saturn's, E 2265. 

Sis cink, i. e. six-five, a throw with two 
dice, B 125. 

Sisoures, //. scissors, HF. 690. 

Sit, pr. s. sits ; see Sitte. 

Site, s. situation, HF. 1114; E 199. 

Sith, conj. since, A 930; Sith that, since, 
F 930, H 120. 



Sith, adv. afterwards, C 869; then, L. 
302. 

Sithen, cotij. since, B 2947 ; Sithen that, 
since, A 2102. 

Sithen, adv. since, ago, A 1521 ; since 
then, R. 1641 ; since, T. iii. 244 ; after- 
wards, A 2617; then, next, L. 304; goon 
s. a greet whyl, a great while ago, L. 
427 ; gon s. longe whyle, long ago, T. i. 
718. 

Sithes, pi. times, A. ii. 42. 9. 

Sitte, V. sit, A 94; Sit, pr. s. sits, dwells, 
A 1599. 3641 ; befits, suits, B 1353 ; is 
fitting, T. i. 246; yvel it sit, it is un- 
becoming, E 460 ; Sat, pt. s. sat, A 469 ; 
affected, T. iv. 231; suited, L. 1735; 
became, R. 750 ; sat on knees, knelt, 3, 
106 ; hit sat me sore, it was very painful 
for me, 3. 1220 ; T. iii. 240 ; Sect, pt. s. 
sat (false form, due to pi. seten), A 2075 > 
Seten, //. pi. sat, A 2893 '. Sete, pt. s. 
subj. would befit, T. i. 985, ii. 117; were 
to sit, 3. 436; was sitting, 3. 501; Seten, 
//. sat, D 420 ; dwelt, A 1452 ; welsittinge, 
well suited, R. 986. 

Sitting-est, sup. adj. most fitting, 5. 551. 

Sive, s. sieve, G 940. 

Sixte, sixth, D 45, F 906. 

Skant, adj. scanty, sparing, niggardly, i, 

175- 

Skarmish, s. skirmish, T. ii. 611. 

Skars, adj. scarce, 9. 36. 

Skathe, s. harm, T. iv. 207. 

Skile, s. reason, cause, HF. 726; gret sk., 
good reason, E 1152; reasonable claim, 
L. 1392; //. reasons, arguments, HF. 
867. 

Skilful, adj. reasonable, L. 385 ; discern- 
ing, B 1038. 

Skilfully, adv. reasonably, with reason, 
G 320; particularly, 4. 155. 

Skilinge, s. reason, B 4. p 6. 155. 

Skinketh,//. s. pours out, E 1722. 

Skippe, ger. to skip, jump, T. i. 218 ; 
V. dance, A 3259; leap, E 1672; pass 
over, L. 622 ; Skipte, //. s. leapt, F 1402. 

Skulle, s. skull, A 3935, 4306. 

Skye, s. cloud, HF. 1600. 

Slake, V. assuage, R. 317; slacken, abate, 
F 841 ; desist (from) , E 705 ; cease, 
E 137; end, E 802; Slake of, omit, L. 
619; Slake, /r. s. subj. grow slack, wane, 
T. ii. 291 ; Slakede, //. s. subj. should 
relax, B 2. m 8. 18. 

Slakke, adj. slow, A 2901 ; de/. slack, 
E 1849. 

Slakker, adj. pi. slacker, more tardy, 
B 1603. 



(§lo00arial Untiex. 



lOI 



Sledes, j-. //. sledges, vehicles, B 4. p i. 

78. PL of s/ed. 
Slee, V. A 661 ; Sleen, ^gr. to slay, A 1222 ; 

Slee, I />r. s. as fut. shall slay, B 2002 ; 

SIeeth,/r. J. slays, A 1118; Slowe, 2 /'A 

5. didst slay, T. iv. 506 ; Slow, pt. s. 

slew, B 627; extinguished, B 3922; 

Slough, pt. s. 7. 56; Slawe, //. slain, 

A 943; Slawen, pp. E 544; Slayn, pp. 

slain, A 63. 
Sleep, //. s. of Slepe. 
Slee re, s. slayer, A 2005. 
Sleet, s. sleet, L. 1220; F 1250. 
Sleig-h, adj. sly, artful, A 3201. 
Sleighly, adv. cunningly, T. v. 83. 
Sleig'hte, s. trickery, T. iv. 1459 ; *trick, 

B 2386; sleight, T. ii. 1512; contrivance, 

E1102; plan, E2131; dexterity, A 1948 ; 

cunning, L. 1382 ; skill, G 867 ; pi. plans, 

T. iv. 1451 ; devices, tricks, E 2421. 
Slely, adv. slily, i. e. skilfully, A. ii. 29. 20. 
Slepe, s. sleep, F 347 ; on slepe, asleep, L, 

209. 
Slepe, V. sleep, 3. 3 ; Slepestow, sleepest 

thou, A 4169; Sleep, i pt. s. slept, HF. 

119 ; Sleep, fit. s. A 98 ; Slepte, weak pt. 

s. E 224 ; Slepe, pt. pi. 3. 166, 177. 
Sloping-, s. sleep, B 4202. 
Sleping--tyrae, s. time to sleep, 6. 54. 
Slepy, adj. sleep-bestowing, A 1387. 
Slewthe, s. sloth, I 388. 
Sleye,//. sly, subtle, T. iv. 972. 
Sleyly, adv. slily, T. ii. 1185; subtly, T. 

ii. 462. 
Slider, adj. slippery, A 1264. 
Sligrhte, s. sleight, cunning, C 131. 
Slike, adj. sleek, R. 542. 
Slinge-stones, pi. stones from a sling, 

T. ii. 941. 
Slinke, ger. to slink, T. iii. 1535. 
Slippe, V. slip, L. 623, 
Slit, /r. J. ^/ Slyde. 
Slitten, V. pierce, F 1260. 
Slivere, s. a slice, portion, T. iii. 1013. 
Slo, J-, sloe, R. 928 ; Sloo, A 3246. 
Slogardye, s. sluggishness, sloth, lazi- 
ness, A 1042. 
Slombrestow, slumberest thou, T. i. 730. 
Slombry, adj. sleepy, I 724. 
Slomeringe, s. slumber, T. ii. 67. 
Slong, pt. s. threw, flung, H 306. Pt. t. 

of slingen. 
Sloo, s. sloe, A 3246; Slo, R. 928. 
Sloppes, s. pi. loose garments, I 422. 
Sloug-h, s. slough, mire, H 64. 
Sloug-h, //. s. slew, A 980 ; see Slee. 
Slouthe, s. sloth, T. ii. 959. 
Slow, s. slough, D 1565; Slough, H 64. 



Slow, pt. s. of Slee. 

Slowia,//. s. slew, B 4. m 7. 43. 

Slug-gy, adj. sluggish, I 706. 

Sluttish, adj. slovenly, G 636. 

Sly, adj. L. 1369; sly (one), A 3940; Slye, 

def. cunning, crafty, 7. 48 ; skilful, F 672 ; 

pi. artfully contrived, F 230. 
Slyde, V. slide, T. v. 351 ; pass, go away, 

E 82, F 924 ; Slit, pr. s. passes away, 5. 

3 ; G 682 ; Slydinge, pres. pt. as adj. 

moving, i. e. unstable, T. v. 825. 
Slyk {for Slyke?), adj. sleek, D 351. 
Slyk, adj. such (Northern), A 4130, 4170. 
Slyly, adv. sagaciously, A 1444. 
Smal, adj. small, A 153; a smal, a little, 

6. 113. 
Smal, adv. little, D 592; but smal, but 

little, F 71; high (of musical notes), 12. 

II. 
Smalish, adj. smallish, R. 826. 
Smart, adj. brisk (said of a fire), G 768. 
Smatre, //-.//. ref. taste slightly, I 857. 
Smart, adj. smart, quick, R. 831 ; brisk, 

G 768 ; pi. painful, 3. 507. 
Smerte, s. pain, smart, F 480, 856, 974; 

anguish, A 3813. 
Smerte, adv. smartly, sharply, A 149; 

sorely, E 629. 
Smerte, ^^r. to smart, L. 502; Smert, //-. 

s. pains (me), i. 152; Smerte,/^. s.subj. 

(it) may pain, A 1394; Smerte, pt. s. 

felt pain, T. ii. 930 ; Smerte, //. s. subj. 

impers. (it) might give pain to, A 230. 
Smit, -en; see Smyte. 
Smithed, pt. s. forged, A 3762. 
Smitted, pp. smutted, i. e. besmirched, 

sullied with dishonour, T. v. 1545. 
Smoking-, pres. pt. reeking with incense 

or perfume, A 2281. 
Smokless, adj. without a smock, E 875. 
Smoky, adj. smoke-like, T. iii. 628. 
Smoot, pt. s. of Smyte, 
Smoterliche, adj. smirched in reputa- 
tion, A 3963. 
Smothe, adj. smooth, A 690. 
Smothe, adv. smoothly, A 676. 
Smyler, s. smiler, flatterer, A 1999. 
Smyte, v. strike, A 1220; Smyten of, 

smite off, L. 1817; Smyteth, pr. s. 

knocks, L. 393 ; Smit, pr. s. smites, 

E 122; Smoot, pt. s. smote, struck, A 

149; Smiten,//. struck, T. ii. 1145. 
Snewed,//. s. abounded, A 345. 
Snibben, v. reprove, chide, lit. ' snub," 

A 523 ; pp. reprimanded, A 4401. 
Snorteth, pr. s. snorts, A 4163 ; pt. s. was 

drawn together (as in sniffing), R. 157. 
Snow, s. R. 558; argent (in heraldry). 



I02 



(@l000arial Untex. 



white, B 3573; //. snow-storms, HF. 

967. _ 
Snowish, adj. snowy, white, T. iii. 1250. 
So, adv. so, A 102 ; such, B 2205 ; in such 

a way, such, T, iii. 1579; so, i.e. pray 

(with verb in subj. mood), T. iii. 1470; 

So as, as well as, as far as, 4. 161 ; so 

have I Joye, as I hope to have bliss, 3. 

1065. 
So, conj. provided that, L. 1319 ; So as, 

whereas, B 4. p 3. 40; So that, provided 

that, C 186. 
Sobrely, adv. gravely, F 1585 ; Soberly, 

sadly, with a melancholy look, A 289. 
Sobrenesse, s. sobriety, I 834. 
Socour, succour, help, A 918, F 1357 ; do 

yow s., help you, 4. 292. 
Socouren, v. aid, T. iii. 1264. 
Socours, s. help, L. 1341. 
Soden, pp. sodden, boiled, I 900. 
Sodein, adj. prompt, forward, T. v. 1024. 
Sodeinly, adv. suddenly, F 1015. 
Softe, adj. soft, A 153 ; gentle, slow, B 

399 ; mild, D 1412. 
Softe, adv. softly, A 2781 ; gently, C 252; 

tenderly, B 275 ; timidly, 3. 1212. 
Softely, adv. softly, F 636; quietly, G 

408 ; in a low tone, L. 2126. 
Softneth, pr. s. assuages, L. 50. 
Sojourne, v. dwell, T. v. 1350; tarry, R. 

381 ; remain, D 987. 
Soken, s. toll, A 3987. A. S. socn. 
Soking-ly, adv. gradually, B 2766. ' So- 

kyngly, idem quod esyly ' ; Prompt. 

Parv. 
Sol, Sol (the sun), G 826. 
Solas, s. amusement, A 798 ; solace, I 

206; comfort, F 802; consolation, T. ii. 

460; relief, B 1972; diversion, B 1904; 

pleasure, B 3964; playfulness, R. 844; 

jov, T. i. 31 ; ease, L. 1966. 
^o\&Q,pt. s. <7/Selle. 
Solempne, adj. festive, grand, E 1125; 

cheerful, A 209; important, A 364; 

illustrious, B 387 ; superb, F 61 ; public, 

I 102. 
Solempnely, adv. pompously, with 

pomp, A 274. 
Solempnitee, J. pomp, A 870; outward 

show, C 244; due ceremony, E 1709. 
Soleyn, adj. sole, solitary, 3. 982; un- 

mated. 5. 607, 614. 
Solsticioun, s. the solstice, or point of 

the ecliptic most remote from the equa- 
tor, A. i. 17. 9. 
Som (sum), indef. pron. some, A 640, B 

1182; one, a certain man, G 922; one, 

3. 305 ; another, 5. 476 ; som shrewe is, 



some one (at least) is wicked, G 995; 

Som . . . som, one . . . another, A 3031 ; 

Somme, //. some, B 2139 ; some (of 

them), L. 1050. 
Somdel, adv. somewhat, B 401 1 ; a little, 

L. 1183; in some measure, A 3911. 
Soiner, s. summer, A 394 ; Someres 

game, summer-game, athletic exhibition, 

D 648. 
Somer-sesoun, s. spring, early summer, 

B 3- P 8. 43- 
Somme, pi. some, T. iv. 995 ; see Som. 
Somme, s. sum, F 1220; chief point, 

upshot, L. 1559 ; //. sums of money, 

B 1407, G 675. 
Som^e, V. ; see Sompne. 
Somnour, s. summoner, apparitor, an 

officer who summoned delinquents be- 
fore the ecclesiastical courts, A 543. 
Somonce, s. summons, D 1586. 
Sompne, v. summon, D 1577 ; Somne, v. 

D 1347- 

Sompnolence, s. somnolence, I 706. 

Somtyme, adv. once, A 65, 85; some- 
times, B 1667 ; some day, B no. 

Sond, s. sand, B 509, 4457. 

Sonde, s, message, B 388, 1049; sending, 
I 625 ; gifts, B 1049 ; visitation, B 760, 
826; trial, B 902; message (or messen- 
ger), G525. 

Sonded, pp. sanded, T. ii. 822. 

Sondry, adj. various, A 14, 25. 

Sone (suna), s. son, A 79, 336. 

Sone, adv. soon, A 1022 ; speedily, D 1264. 

Sone-ln-lawe, s. son-in-law, E 315. 

Sone St, adv. super I. soonest, B 3716. 

Song, -e, -en ; see Singe. 

Sonne, s. sun, A 7, 30. 

Sonne-beem, s. sunbeam, D 868. 

Sonnish, adj. sun-like, golden, T. iv. 736, 
816. 

Soor, s. sore, wound, A 1454. 

Soor, adj. wounded, grieved, A 2695; 
sore, F 1571 ; sad, T. v. 639. 

Soot, s. soot, an emblem of bitterness, T. 
iii. H94. 

Sooth, adj. true, L. 14 ; as adv. truly, C 
636. 

Sooth, s. truth, A 284; Sothe, G 662; 
Sothe, dat. B 1939. 

Soothfastnesse, s. truth, B 4518. 

Soothly, adv. truly, A 117. 

Sooty, adj. begrimed with soot, B 4022. 

Sop, s. sop (of toasted bread), E 1843; 
Sop in wyn, wine with bread soaked in 
it, A 334. 

Soper, s. supper, A 348 ; Sopeer, F 1189. 

Sophistrye, s. evil cunning, L. 137. 



(glossarial EntJex. 



103 



Sophyme, s. a sophism, trick of logic, E 

5 ; p/. deceits, F 554. 
Sore, adv. sorely, A 148 ; bar so sore, bore 

so ill, E85. 
Sore, ger. to soar, HF. 531 ; to mount 

aloft, F 123. 
Sorer, adv. more sorely, L. 502. 
Sorest, adv. most sorely, 5. 404. 
Sormounte, ger. to surpass, R. 667 ; //-. 

s. rises above, T. iii. 1038. 
Sort, s. lot, T, ii. 1754; destiny, chance, 

A 844; kind, A 4381; divination, T. i. 

76. 
Sorted,//", s. allotted, T. v. 1827. 
Sorwe, s. sorrow, grief, A 951 ; mourn- 
ing, B 2171; sympathy, compassion, F 

422 ; with sorwe, with ill luck to you, D 

308. 
Sorwestow, thou sorrowest, B i. p 6. 

80; pr. J-. I 85 ; pr.pl. A 2824. 
Sor-weful, adj. sorrowful, L. 1832. 
Sorwefulleste, adj. most sorrowful, E 

2098. 
SorwefuUy, adv. sadly, A 2978. 
Sorwing", s. sorrow, 3. 606. 
Sory, adj. sorrowful, mournful, A 2004, 

2010; sad, B 2899; unlucky, B 1949; ill, 

C 876 ; miserable, H 55, 
Sory, adv. sorely, B 2. p 4. 100. 
Soster, s. sister,' A 3486. 
Sote, adj. sweet, A i, B 2348. 
Sote, adv. sweetly, L. 2612. 
Sotel, adj. subtle, cunning, 18. 43. 
Soteltee, subtlety, skill, 18. 77. 
Soth, adj. true, B 169; Sooth, L. 14. 
Sothe, s. truth, A 845. See Sooth. 
Sother, adj. comp. truer, G 214. 
SotMastnesse, s. truth, B 2365; cer- 
tainty, I 380. 
Sothly, adv. verily, soothly, A. pr. 23. 
Soth-sawe, s. true saying, truth, HF. 

2089; pi. HF. 676. 
Sotil, adj. subtle, cunning, L. 1556, 2559 ; 

subtly woven, A 1054; thin, A 2030. 
Sotilly, adv. skilfully, R. 1119; cleverly, 

R. 772. 
Sotted, adj. besotted, befooled, G 1341. 
Souded, pp. confirmed, B 1769. 
Sought, -e; see Seke. 
Souke, ger. to suck, A 4157 ; to embezzle, 

A 4416 ; pp. been at the breast, E 450. 
Soul, adj. sole, single, E 2080. 
Soule, s. soul, A 656, 781. 
Soulfre, s. sulphur, HF. 1508. 
Soun, s. sound, musical sound, A 674, E 

271 ; vaunt, L. 267 ; pi. sounds, A 2512. 
Sound, adj. unhurt, L. 1619 ; pi. in strong 

health, T. iii. 1526. 



Sounde, ger. to heal, make sound, 7. 242 ; 

V. heal, R. 966. 

Soune, ger. to sound, to utter, T. ii. 573; 
imitate in sound, speak alike, F 105 ; 
Sounen, v. sound, hence, tend, redound, 
T. i. 1036; Souneth, pr. s. tends (to- 
wards), relates (to), T. iii. 1414; is con- 
sonant (with), B 3157; makes (for), H 
195 ; Sounen, pr. pi. tend, I 1068 ; pt. s. 
inclined, T. iv. 1676; pres. pt. accordant 
with, in agreement with, A 275; Soun- 
inge in, tending to, A 307. 

Souned; ^d-j/^j., best-sounding, T. ii. 1031. 

Soupe, V. sup, T. ii. 944. 

Souper, s. supper, T. ii. 947. 

Souple, adj. pliant, A 203. 

Sourdeth,/r. s. arises, I 475. 

Soure, adj. bitter, cruel, B i. p 4. 88. 

Soure, adv. sourly, bitterly, B 2012. 

Soures, s. pi. sorrels, bucks of the third 
year, 3. 429. 

Sourmounteth, pr. s. surmounts, rises 
above, T. iii. 1038. 

Sours, s. source, origin, T. v. 1591 ; E 49; 
a springing aloft, HF. 544; swift up>- 
ward flight, D 1938, 1941. 

Souter, s. cobbler, A 3904. 

Soutiltee, s. device, D 576. 

Souvenance, s. remembrance, 24. 14. 

Soveraynetee, s. sovereignty, E 114, F 
751 ; supremacy, D 818. 

Sovereyn, adj. supreme, very high, A 67 ; 
chief, B 3339; sovereign, D 1048; supe- 
rior, A. ii. 28. 39 (a technical term, 
applied to the western signs of the 
zodiac) ; as s. lord, i. 69 ; master, G 590; 
Sovereyne, /^w. 5. 422; Sovereyns, //. 
superiors, I 392, 402. 

Sovereynly, adv. royally, B 2462 ; chiefly, 

B 4552- 
Sovereyntee, s. supremacy, D 1038. 
Sowdan, s. sultan, B 177. 
So^wdanesse, s. sultaness, B 358. 
So"we, V. sew up, T. ii. 1201, 1204; pp. 

sewn, A 685. 
Sowen, V. sow, B 1182; Sowen, pp. R. 

1617; So\we,pp. T. i. 385. 
Sowle, s. soul, life, T. ii. 1734. 
Sowled,//. endued with a soul, G 329. 
Sowne, V. sound, play upon, A 565; 

sound, T. iii. 189; Sowneth, pr. s. 

sounds, I 160; signifies, A. i. 21. 62; pr. 

pi. play, F 270 ; Sowneth, pr. pi. tend 

(to), are consonant (with), F517 ; Souned, 

pt. pi. tended, B 3348. See Soune. 
Space, s. room, T. i. 714; space of time, 

A 87 ; while, C 239 ; opportunity, spare 

time, A 35 ; course, A 176. 



X04 



(glossarial Cutex. 



Spak,//. J. spake, A 124; see Speke. 

Span, //. J-. spun, L. 1762. 

Spanne, s. span, A 155. 

Span-newe, adj. span-new, T. iii. 1665. 
Lit. ' newly spun.' 

Spare, v. spare, refrain, A 192 ; cease, 5. 
699 ; pp. passed over, L. 2602. 

Sparhauk, s. sparrow-hawk, B 1957. 

Sparinge, s. moderation, I 835. 

Sparkle, s. small spark, B 2095. 

Sparow, s. sparrow, 5. 351. 

Sparre, s. wooden beam, A 990, 1076. 

Sparth, s. battle-axe, A 2520. 

Sparwe, s. sparrow, A 626. 

Spaynel, s. spaniel, D 267. 

Spece, s. species, sort, I 407 ; //. kinds, A 
3013, I 865. 

Speche, s. speech, L. 1084; discourse, A 
307; talk, A 783, D 1020; address, 3. 
1131 ; oratory, F 104. 

Special, adj. special ; i/i special, espe- 
cially, in particular, A 444, 1017. 

Spectacle, s. eye-glass, D 1203. 

Spede, ^^r. to succeed, C 134 ; Spede me, 
V. be quick, 5. 385 ; Spede, pr. s. subj. 
speed, prosper, A 769 ; Spedde, pt. s. 
hastened, moved quickly, A 3649; made 
to prosper, B 3876; pt. s. reji. hasted, A 
1217 ; I //. s. refi. L. 200 ; pp. terminated, 
determined, 5. loi ; accomplished, G 

357- 
Speed, 5. help, T. ii. 9 ; success, T. i, 17 ; 
for cotnune spede, for the good of all, 5. 

507- 
Speedful, adj. advantageous, B 727. 
Speere, s. sphere, F 1283. 
Speke, V. speak, 3. 852; Spekestow, 

speakest thou, G 473 ; Spak, i //. s. 

spake, L. 97 ; pt. s. 3. 503 ; Speken, //.//. 

3. 350; Spaken {bette?- Speken),//. pi. 

spake, T, i. 565 ; Speke,//. s. subj. might 

speak, T. ii. 1119; Spoken,//. A 31, 
Speking", s. speech-making, oratory, 5. 

488 ; speaking, H 335. 
Spelle. s. dat. a story, B 2083. 
Spence, .f. buttery, D 1931. 
Spending-silver, s. silver to spend, 

money in hand, G 1018. 
Spere, s. spear, A 114; as nigh as men 

may casten with a spere, a spear's cast, 

HF. 1048. 
Spere, s. sphere, orbit, 4. 137; 16. 11. 
Sperhauk, s. sparrowhawk, B 4647. 
Sperme, s. seed, B 3199. 
Sperred,//. barred, T. v. 521. 
Spete, V. spit, T. ii. 1617; Spetten,//*. //. 

I 270. 
Spewe, V. vomit, B 2607. 



Spewing-, s. vomit, I 138. 

Spicerye, s. mixture of spices, B 2043. 

Spille, V. spill, drop, T. v. 880; kill. L. 
1574; destroy, ruin, E 503; perish, 6. 
121 ; ger. to destroy, T. v. 588 ; to sp. 
labour, to lose labour, H 153 ; doth me 
sp., causes me to die, 6. 14; Spillestow 
teres, leltest thou tears fall (Lat. manas), 
B I. p 4. 4 ; //. killed, B 857 ; lost, i. 180 ; 
ruined, D 1611; confounded, D 388. 

Spirit, s. A 2809; Spirites, the (four) 
spirits in alchemy (sulphur, sal ammo- 
niac, quicksilver, arsenic), G 820; vital 
forces, 3. 489. 

SpitOUS, adj. malicious, R. 979 ; inhospi- 
table, 22. 13. 

Spitously, adv. spitefully, D 223 ; vehe- 
mently, A 3476. 

Spoke' pp. of Speke. 

Sponne, 2pt. pi. did spin, T. iii. 734. 

Spoon, s. spoon, F 602 ; Spones, //. C 
90S. 

Spore, s. spur, A 2603 ; //. A 473. 

Sporne, ger. to spurn, kick, 13. 11 ; //. s. 
spurns, treads, T. ii. 797 ; //. s. tripped 
himself up, A 4280. 

Spot. s. defect, E 2146. 

Spousaille, s. espousal, wedding, E 115, 
180. 

Spoused, //. wedded, E 3, 386. 

Spouted. //. vomited, B 487. 

Sprayned ; see Springen. 

Sprede, v. spread, open, 4. 4; ger. to e.\- 
pand, R. 1679 ; Spradde, //. s. spread, E 
418, 722; covered, 7. 40; Sprad, //. 
spread, A 2903 ; dispersed, 3. 874 ; 
Spradde, //>.//. wide open, T. iv. 1422. 

Spreynd; see Springen. 

Spring, .c. dawn, A. ii. 6. 6; first growth, 
R. 834; //. merry dances, HF. 1235. 

Springe, strong v. spring up, grow, A 
3018 ; rise, B 4068 ; spread abroad, 7. 74 ; 
spring, be carried, L. 719 ; ger. to rise 
(as the sun) , A 2522 ; to dawn, A 822 ; to 
arise, i. 133; Sprang, //. s. grew up, R. 
1425 ; Sprong. pt. s. spread out, R. 1704 ; 
Spronge, //. become famous, A 1437 ; 
grown, L. 1054; spronge amis, alighted 
in a wrong place, HF. 2079. 

Springen, rveak v. sprinkle, scatter, 
sow broadcast, B 1183; Spreynd, pp. 
sprinkled, B 422, 1830; Sprayned, //. 
B 2. p 4. 132. A. S. sprengan. 

Springers, s.pl. sources, origins, I 387. 

Springing, s. source, E 49. 

Spume, V. spurn, kick, F 616. 

Spyce, s. spice, R. 1367, 1371 ; //. spicery, 
L. 1 1 10; species, kinds, 1 83, 102. 



(glossarial h\hzx. 



105 



Spyced, pp. spiced, A 3378 ; scrupulous, 

A 526, D 435. 
Spycerye, s. collection of spices, mixture 

of spices, A 2935, B 136. 
Spyr, s. spire, shoot, T. ii. 1335. 
Squames, s.p/. scales, G 759. 
Squaymous, adj. squeamish, sparing 

(except rarely), A 3337. 
Squiereth, pr. s. attends, accompanies, 

t>305- 

Squire, s. a ' square,' a carpenter's instru- 
ment for measuring right angles, D 
2090 ; p/. measuring-rules, A. i. 12. 3. 

Squyer, s. squire, A 79. 

Stable, adj. abiding, A 3004, 3009; firm, 
3. 645; sure, E 1499; constant, 4. 281; 
steadfast, F 871. 

Stablissed, pp. established, A 2995. 

Stadie, s. r<4ce-course, B 4. p 3. 11. 

Staf, s. staff, stick, L. 2000; (perhaps a 
bed-staff), A 4294,4296; Staves, ^(?«. of 
the shaft of a car, 7. 184. 

Staf-slinge. s. a staff-sling, sling with a 
handle, B 2019. 

Stages, p/. positions, HF. 122. 

Stak, pf. s. stuck, T. iii. 1372 ; was fast- 
ened on, R. 458. 

Stakereth./r. s. staggers, L. 2687. 

Stal. pr. s. of Stelen. 

Stalke, s. stalk, A 1036; piece of straw, 
A 3919; Stalkes, />/. (Lat. /ij/w/7<?j), B i. 
m 6. 15 ; stems, T. ii. 968 ; uprights of a 
ladder, A 3625. 

Stalke, V. creep up (to), T. ii. 519 ; move 
stealthily, L. 1781 ; pr. s. walks stealthily, 
A 1479 ; moves slowly, A 3648. 

Stalle, -f. dai. ox-stall, T. v. 1469. 

Stamin, s. a coarse harsh cloth, tamine, 
tammy, L. 2360 ; I 1052. O. F. esta>nine. 

Stampe, pr. pi. bray in a mortar, C 538. 

Stanched, pp. staunched, B 2. p 2. 53. 

Stank, s. lake, tank, pool, I 841. E. tank. 

Stant, stands; see Stonde. 

Stapen, pp. advanced, B 4011, E 1514 {in 
MS. E.). 

Stare, s. starling, 5. 348. 

Starf , pt. s. of Sterve. 

Stark, adj. strong, E 1458 ; severe, B 
3560. _ 

Startling", moving suddenly, L. 1204. 

Staunchen, v. satisfy, B 3. m 3. 3. 

Stede, s. place, HF. 731; in stede of, in- 
stead of, B 3308. 

Stede, s. steed, A 2157. 

Stedfastnesse, s. constancy, firmness, 
E 699 ; stability, 15. 7. 

Steer, s. bullock, A 2149. 

Steked, pp. stuck, L. 161 a. 



Stele, s. lit, handle; i. e. the (cool) end, 

A 3785. 
Stelen, v. steal, A 562; Steleth, pr. s. 

steals away, B 21 ; Stal, pt. s. stole, L. 

796; came (or went) cunningly, HF. 

418 ; went stealthily, B 3763 ; stal away, 

stole away, 3. 381 ; Stole, //. stolen, A 

2627. 
Stellifye, v. make into a constellation, 

HF. 586, 1002. 
Stemed, //, s. shone, glowed, A 202. A. S. 

stcvian. 
Stenten, v. leave off, A 903 ; ger. to stay, 

A 2442 ; V. cease, leave off, B 3925 ; 

Stente, 2/r. s. subj. cease, 18. 61 ; Stente, 

pt. s. ceased, stopped, 3. 154; L. 1240; 

remained, L. 821 ; stayed, T. i. 273 ; 

Stente, pt. pi. ceased, T'. i. 60 ; delayed, 

L. 633 ; //. stopped, A 1368. 
Stepe, adj. pi. glittering, bright, A 201, 

753. A. S. steap. 
Steppes,//, foot-tracks, L. 829. 2209. 
Stere, s. helm, rudder, B 833; pilot, 

helmsman, guide, B 448 ; in stere, upon 

my rudder, T. v. 641. 
Stere; v. steer, rule, T. iii. 910 ; i pr. s. 

steer, T. ii. 4; pp. controlled, L. 935. 
Stere, v. stir, move, excite, T. i. 228 ; pro- 
pose, T. iv. 1451 ; pr. s. stirs, HF. 817. 
Sterelees, adj. rudderless, B 439. 
Steresman, j. steersman, HF. 436. 
Stering-e, s. stirring, motion, HF. 800. 
Sterlinges. pi. sterling coins, C 907. 
Sterne, adj. stern, E 465 ; violent, T. iii. 

743- 

Sterre, s. star, 5. 68. 300; constellation, 
HF. 599. 

Stert, s. start, 1 . v. 254 ; at a stert, in a 
moment, A 1705. 

Sterte, v. start, go quickly, T, ii. 1634; 
move away, T. iii. 949 ; pass away, B 
335 ; 'eap,' skip, R. 344 ; Stert, pr. s. 
rouses, HF. 681 ; Sterte, \ pt. s. departed, 
T. iv. 93; rushed, L. 811; leapt, A 952; 
went, T. ii. 1094; went at once, L. 660; 
Sterting, pres. pt. bursting suddenly, 
L. 1741. 

Sterve, v. die, A 1249; die of famine, C 
451 ; Starf, pt. s. L. 1691 ; A 933, B 283 ; 
Storven, //./>/. C 888. 

Stevene, s. voice, sound, language, A 
2562; rumour, talk, T. iii. 1723; time, 
moment, esp. of an appointment, A 
1524 ; sound, L. 1219 ; meeting by ap)- 
pointment, 4. 52 ; sette st., made ap- 
pointment, A 4383. 

Stewe, s. a fish-pond, A 350; a small 
room, closet, T. iii. 601 ; brothel, HF. 26. 



E 2 



io6 



(glossarial hxHtx. 



Ste"we-dore, s. closet-door, T. iii. 698. 

Steyre, s. degree {hat. ^^radus), 4. 129; 
Steyres,^^//. stair's, T. iii. 205. 

Stiborn, adj. stubborn, D 456, 637. 

Stidefast, adj. steadfast, B 2641. 

Stif, adj. strong, A 673; bold, R. 1270; 
hard, D 2267. 

Stiken, ^<?/-, to stick, T. i. 297 ; Stiked, 
/>/. s. stuck, B 509 ; fixed, B 2097 ; Stikede, 
//. s. pierced, B 3897; Stikked, fixed, 
L. 2202 ; pp. stabbed, B 430 ; a stiked 
swy/i, a stuck pig, C 556. 

Stiking-e, s. sticking, setting, I 954. 

Stikkes, pi. palings, B 4038. 

Stillatorie, s. still, vessel used in distil- 
lation, G 580. 

Stille, adv. quietly, L. 816; still, D 2200. 

Stille, ger. to silence, T. ii. 230. 

Sting-eth, pr. s. pierces, L. 645, 

Stinte, V. leave off, A 1334 ; cease, G 883 ; 
cause to cease, i. 63 ; end, E 747 ; ger. to 
cease, B 2164 ; to stop, T. ii. 383 ; cease, 
I 720; restrain, R. 1441 ; stop, avert, 
L. 1647 ; Stinte, i pr. s. leave off telling, 
HF. 1417; py.pl. cease, I 93; pt. s. subj. 
may cease, B 413 ; Stinte, pt. s. ceased, 
A 2421 ; was silent, 3. 1299 ; pt. pi. 
stopped {or pr.pl. stop), L. 294; Stinte, 
pt. s. subJ. should cease, T. i. 848 ; pp. 
stopped, T. iii. 1016; stint thy clappe, 
hold your tongue, A 3144; Stinteth, 
imp. pi. stay, T. ii. 1729. 

Stintingre, s. ceasing, end, B 2. m 7. 37. 

Stiren, v. stir, excite, B 2696. 

Stiropes, s.pl. stirrups, B 1163. 

Stirte, pt. s. started, D 1046; rushed, H 
303 ; went quickly, E 2153. 

Stith, s. anvil, A 2026. I eel. ste^i. 

Stod, -e ; see Stonde. 

Stok, s. a block of wood, A. ii. 38. 6; 
source, 14. i ; race, A 1551 ; //. stumps, 
A 2934; posts, T. iii. 589. 

Stoke, ger. to stab, thrust, A 2546. 

Stokked, //. fastened in the stocks, T. 
iii. 380. 

Stole, s. stool, frame for tapestry-work, 
L. 2352; //. chairs, D 288. 

Stole, pp. ^/Stelen. 

Stomak, s. stomach, T. i. 787; appetite, 
D 1847 ; compassion, D 1441. 

Stomblen, /r.//. stumble, A 2613. 

Stonde, v. stand, B 1050; be placed, A 
745 ; be understood, be fixed, E 346 ; be 
set in view (as a prize at a game), B 
193 1 ; Jy"^ stonde, finds standing, L. 
1499; ^ton\, pr. s. stands, is, T. iii. 1562; 
Stant, pr. s. stands, B 618 ; consists, I 
107, 1029 ; is, B 1304 ; Stood, pf. s. A 354 ; 



stuck fast, D 1541; Stonden, pp. HF. 

1928. 
Stongen, pp. stung, .\ 1079. 
Stoon, s. stone, A 774; precious stone, 

gem, R. 1086. 
Stoon-"wal, stone-wall, L. 713. 
Stoor, s. store, stock (of a farm), A 598; 

store, D 2159 ; value, D 203. 
Stopen,//. advanced, E 1514 (MS. E. has 

stapen) . 
Stoppen, V. stop, T. ii. 804. 
Store, s. store, value, B 4344; possession, 

L. 2337. 
Store, ger. to store, B 1463. 
Store, adj. voc. audacious, bold, E 2367. 

I eel. storr. 
Storial, adj. historical, A 3179 ; Storial 

sooth, historical truth, L. 702. 
Storie, s. history, legend of a saint (or 

the like), A 709; history, E 1366; tale, 

story, 7. 10; pi. books of history, T. v. 

1044. 
Storven, /A />/. <?/Sterve, died, C 888. 
Stot, s. a stallion, horse, cob, A 615; 

heifer (a term of abuse), D 1630. 
Stounde, s. hour, time, while, A 1212, 

4007 ; short time, B 1021 ; moment, L. 

949 ; in a stounde, at a time, once, A 

3992; upon a stounde, in one hour, T. iv. 

625 ; pi. hours, seasons, T. iii. 1752. 
Stoundemele, at various times, from 

time to time, T. v. 674. 
Stoupe,^^r. to stoop, G 1311. 
Stour, s. battle, contest, R. 1270. 
Stout, adj. strong, A 545. 
Straig'hter, adj. more stretched out, 

more expanded, R. 119. 
Strake, v. move, proceed, 3. 1312. 
Strange, adj. strange, F 89; external, D 

1 161; not its own, A. ii. 19. 7. Every 

star has its ow7i degrees (of longitude) 

in the equator and ecliptic. 
Strangenesse, s. estrangement, B 1576. 
Stranglen, pr. pi. strangle, worry, I 768. 
Strangling, s. A 2458 ; o/str., caused by 

strangling, L. 807. 
Straught, -e; see Strecche. 
Straunge, adj. strange, foreign, A 13; 

unwonted, 7. 202; difficult, hard to 

agree upon, F 1223 ; like a stranger, T. 

ii. 1660; unfriendly, estranged, R. 1065; 

distant, unbending, 5. 584; not well 

known, A. ii. 17. rub.; [a strange star is 

one that is not represented upon the 

Rete of the Astrolabe] ; //. strangers, T. 

ii. 411. 
Straungely, adv. distantly, T. v. 955. 
Straw , J. T. i i i . 859 ; as interj. a straw ! F 695. 



(!llo00arial Kntiex. 



107 



Strawen, v. strew, L. 207 ; 2 pr. s. subj. 

F 613 ; //. strewn, 1 918. 
Stray te, .f. strait, B 464. 
Strecche, v. stretch, B 4498 ; extend, T. 

ii. 341 ; reach, 7. 341 ; Streighte, pt. s. 

stretched, HF. 1373 ; Straughte, //. pi. 

extended, A 2916 ; Straughten, pt. pi. 

stretched out, R. 1021 ; Streight, stretched 

out; long str., stretched at full length, 

T. iv. 1163; pp. as adv. straight, T. ii. 

599- 
Stree, s. straw, A 2918 ; pi. 3. 718. 
Streem, ^. river, current, L. 2508; stream, 

A 464; ray (of light), 2. 94. 
Streen, s. strain, i. e. stock, progeny, 

race, E 157. 
Streig-ht, adj. sti-aight, 3, 957. 
Streiglat, adv. straight, straightway, A 

671. 
Streig-ht, -e; see Strecche, 
Streit, adj. narrow, A 1984; scanty, R. 

457 ; B 4179 ; strict, A 174 ; pi. scanty, 

small, D 1426. A. F. estreit. 
Streite, pp. as adj. def. drawn, B 4547. 

(It here represents Lat. strictus.) 
Streite, adv. closely, T. iv. 1689; strictly, 

L. 723 ; tightly, A 457. 
Streitnes, s. smallness, A. i. 21. 55, 
Stremeden, pt. pi. streamed, T. iv. 247. 
Streng", s. string, D 2067; pi. 5. 197, 
Streng-er, adj. comp. stronger, B 2410. 
Streng-est, strongest, T. i. 243. 
Strengest-feythed, strongest in faith, 

T. i, 1007. 
Streng-the, s. strength, A 84; force, 3. 

351 ; pi. sources of strength, B 3248. 
Strepen, v. strip, E 1958; do str. me, 

cause me to be stripped, E 2200. 
Strete, s. street, T. ii. 612; dat. HF. 

1049; street, road, way, i. 70; B 1683. 
Streyne, v. compress, T. iii. 1205 ; strain, 

press, E 1753 ; constrain, E 144 ; hold, 

confine, R. 1471 ; ger. to compress, T. 

iii. 1071 ; Streyne, pr. pi. strain (as 

through a sieve), C 538, 
Streyt, adj. small, B 3. m 2. 26, 
Strike, s. hank (of flax), A 676. 
Strogelest ; see Strugle. 
Stroke, ger. to stroke, T. iii. 1249. 
Strokes, pi. of Strook. 
Strompetes, s. pi. strumpets, B i. p i. 

54- 
Stronde, dat. shore, L. 2189; Strondes, 

pi. shores, A 13. 
Strong-, adj. difficult, B 2635 ; pi. severe, 

A 1338, 2771. 
Strong-e, adv. securely, R. 241. 
Stroof . pt. s. of Stryve. 



Strook, s. stroke, A 1701 ; Strokes, pi. T. 

iii. 1067. 
Strouted,//. s. stuck out, A 3315. 
Strowe, V. strew, L. loi a. 
Stroyer, destroyer, 5. 360. 
Struggle, V. struggle, E 2374; Strogelest, 

2 pr. s. C 829. 
Stryf, s. quarrel, strife, A 1187, 2784; 

took stryf =' took up the cudgels,' B 1. 

P 4- 93- ' 

Stryk, s. stroke, mark, A. ii. 12. 19. 

Stryke, v. strike ; Stryken out, strike 
out, D 1364; Strike, />;>. struck, 11. 35. 

Stryve, v. strive, struggle, 10. 30 ; oppose, 
E 170; Stroof, /A s. strove, vied, A 1038. 

Stryvinge, s. striving, strife, B 2674. 

Stubbel-g-oos, s. fatted goose, A 4351. 

Stubbes, pi. stumps, A 1978. 

Studie, s. study, A 303 ; state of medi- 
tation, A 1530; Study, library, F 1207, 
1214 ; Studies, pi. endeavours, B 3. p 2. 
93 ; desires, B 4. p 2. 56. 

Studie, V. study, A 184; ^^z-. give heed, I 
1090; Studieth,/r. J. deliberates, E 1955. 

Stuffed, pp. filled, E 264. 

Sturdely, adv. boldly, 4. 82. 

Sturdinesse, s. sternness, E 700. 

Sturdy, adj. cruel, hard, harsh, stern, E 
698, 1049; firm, T. ii, 1380; D 2162. 

Sty, s. pig-sty, D 1829, 

Stye, ger. to mount up, B 4. p 6. 414, 

Style (i), J-. a stile, a means to get over 
a barrier by climbing, C 712, F 106. 

Style (2), s. style, mode of writing, F 105. 

Styves,//. stews, D 1332. 

Styward, s. steward, B 914. 

Suasioun, s. persuasiveness, B 2, p i, 45. 

Subdekne, s. subdeacon, I 891. 

Subg-it, adj. subject, T. v. 1790; Subget, 
T. i. 231. 

Subgit, s. subject, T. ii. 828 ; pi. servants, 
D 1990. 

Subjeccion, J. '(i), suggestion, (a thing 
subjected to the mind), I 351 ; (2), sub- 
jection, obedience, B 270; submission, 
4. 32; subjection, governance, B 3656, 
3742. 

Sublymatories, s. pi. vessels for subli- 
mation, G 793. 

Sublynaed, pp. sublimed, sublimated, G 
774. ' Sublimate, to bring by heat into 
the state of vapour' ; Webster. 

Sublyming", s. sublimation, G 770. 

Submitted, pp. subjected, B 5. p i. 44; 
ye ben s., ye have submitted, B 35. 

Subtil, adj. subtle, C 141 ; ingenious, A. 
pr. 60; skilful, L. 672; finely woven, 5. 
272. 



io8 



(^logsarial JEntJex. 



Subtilitee, s. subtlety, craft, secret knowl- 
edge, G 620 ; skill, craft, G 844 ; //. 
tricks, E 2421. 

Subtilly, adv. craftily, A 610; subtly, F 
222. 

Subtiltee, s. subtlety, F 140; specious 
reasoning, HF. 855; skill, B 4509; trick, 
D 1420. 

Succedent, si>. a ' succedent ' house, A. 
ii. 4. 48, The succedent houses are the 
second, fifth, eighth, and eleventh, as 
these are about to follow the most im- 
portant houses, which are the first, 
fourth, seventh, and tenth. 

Sucre, s. sugar, T. iii. 1194. 

Sucred, pp. sugred, T, ii. 384. 

SuflBsaunce, s. sufficiency, A 490; suffi- 
cient food, D 1843 ; enough, a com- 
petence, 10. 15 ; contentment, B 4029 ; 

3- 703. 

Suffisaunt, adj. sufficient, good enough, 
A 1631 ; A. pr. 7 ; capable, L. 2524 ; well 
endowed, L. 1067. 

Sufiasauntly, adv. sufficiently, A. pr. 43 ; 
availably, B 2492. 

Suffrabl'e, adj. patient, D 442. 

Suffraunce, s. longsuffering, B 2479; 
patience, E 1162; Suffiance, longsuffer- 
ing, B 2654; permission, F 788. 

Suffraunt, pres. ft. as s. patient man, 
T. iv. 1584; as adj. patient, tolerant, 3. 

lOIO. 

Suffre, V. suffer, permit, A 649; endure, 
3. 412. 

Suffyse, V. suffice. B 3648 ; Suffyseth, (it) 
suffices, 12. 15 ; Suffyce, imp. s. be con- 
tent (spend frugally), 13. 2. 

Suggestioun, s. a criminal charge, B 
3607 ; hint, I 331. 

Sugre, s. sugar, B 2046. 

Sukkenye, s. short frock, tunic, R, 1232. 
O. F. souquanie ; F. souquenie (Cotgrave). 

Summitted, pp. submitted, B 3. p 10. 15 ; 
subjected, B 4. p 6. 145. 

Superflce, s. surface, A. i. 21, 42; in the 
s. of, in the immediate neighbourhood 
of. A. i. 21. 32. 

Superfluitee, s. superfluity, excess, A 
436 ; over-abundance, A. pr. 50. 

Supplien, v. supplicate, entreat, B 3. 
p 8. II. 

Supportacioun, s. support, B 2332. 

Supprysed, pp. surprised, T. iii. 1184. 

Surcote, s. upper coat, A 617. 

Surement, s. pledge, F 1534. 

Suretee, s. security. D 903 ; careless con- 
fidence, 7. 215. 

Surfeet, s. surfeit. I 913. 



Surinounteth,/r. s. surpasses, L. 123. 

Surplys, s. surplice, A 3323, G 558. 

Surquidrie, s. over-confidence, presump- 
tion. I 403; arrogance, T. i. 213. O. F. 
surquiderie. 

Sursanure, s. a wound healed outwardly, 
but not inwardly, F 1113. 

Surveyaunce, s. surveillance, C 95. 

Suspecioun, s. suspicion, T. ii. 561. 

Suspecious, adj. ominous of evil, E 540. 

Suspect, adj. suspicious, ominous of evil, 
E 541. 

Suspect, 5. suspicion, B 2385. 

Sustenance, s. support, living, E 202. 

Sustene, v. sustain, support. F 861 ; main- 
tain, I. 22; endure, B 2654; uphold, 
preserve, B 160; hold up (herself), 7. 
177. 

Suster, s. sister, L. 592. 986; Her suster 
love, love for her sister, L. 2365 ; Sus- 
tren,//. T. iii. 733 ; Sustres, pi. B 4057. 

Suwe, ger. to follow, T. i. 379. 

Suyte, s. suit, array (of like kind) , A 2873 : 
Sute, uniform pattern, 3. 261. 

Swa, so (Northern), A 4040. 

Swal, pt. s. of Swelle. 

Swalo'we, v. swallow, HF. 1036. 

S"walwe, s. swallow, A 3258. 

Swappe, s. a swoop, the striking of a 
bird of prey, HF. 543. 

S'wappe, ger. to swap, strike, E 586; 
Swapte, pt. s. dashed, T. iv, 256 ; fell 
suddenly, E 1099 ; Swap, unp. s. strike 
off, G 366. 

Swartish, adj. as adv. dark, HF. 1647. 

Swatte, pt. s. of Swete. 

Swayn, s. servant-lad, young man, A 
4027. 

S'weig'h, s. motion, sway, B 296. 

Swelleth, pr. s. swells, A 2743; Swal, 
pt. s. D 967 ; up swal, was puffed up 
with anger, B 1750 ; Swollen, pp. proud, 
E950. 

Swelte, V. die, T. iii. 347 ; Swelt, pr. s. 
dies, 4. 128; //. s. died, E 1776; lan- 
guished, fainted, A 1356. 

Swelwe, V. swallow, B 2808. 

Swerd, s. sword, A 112. 

Swere, v. swear, A 454; Swoor, i pt. s. 
E 2312; Swore, 2 pt. s. L. 1378; Swoor, 
pt. s. swore, 7. loi ; Sworen, Z^. pi. swore, 
B 344; Sworn, //. sworn (to the con- 
trary), T. iv. 976; A 1089; sworn (to do 
it), G 681 ; bound by oath, F 18 ; sworn 
(it should not be so), D 640. 

Swering, s. swearing, C 631. 

Swete, adj. sweet, A 5. 2427; as s. sweet 
one, love, 3. 832. 



(glogsarial Entiex. 



109 



S"wete, s. sweetness, 5. 161. 

Swete, V. sweat, G 579; Swatte, pf. s. 
sweated, B 1966. 

Swete herte, sweetheart, T. iii. 69. 

Swete-Loking, Sweet-Looking, R. 920. 

Swetnesse, s. sweetness, i. 51 ; nourish- 
ment, 3. 415. 

Swetter, adj. comp. sweeter, R. 622, 768. 

Swety, ad/, sweaty, 9. 28. 

Sweven, s. dream, R, 28; />/. dreams, 
R.3. 

S'wevening', s. dream, R. 26; Sweven- 
inges {pron. swev'ningez) , R. i. 

Sweynte,//. as def. adj. tired out, sloth- 
ful, HF. 1783. V'<^.oi swenchen. 

Swich. adj. such, A 3, 243, 313; such a 
thmg, B 4626 ; Swich a, such a, B 3921 ; 
S\\ ich oon, such a one, F 231. 

Swimme, v. swim, A 3550, L. 2450 ; Swom- 
men, pt. pi. were filled with swimming 
things, 5. 188. 

Swink, s. labour, toil, A 188, 540. 

Swinke, v. toil, labour, T. v. 272; to 
cause to labour, HF. 16; pr. pi. work 
for, G 21 ; Swonken,//. toiled, A 4235. 

Swinker, s. labourer, toiler, A 531. 

Swire, s. neck, throat, R. 325. 

Swogh, s. (i) sough, low noise, 5. 247; 
murmur, HF. 1031 ; sigh, groan, A 3619; 
rustling noise, blast, A 1979 ; whizzing 
noise, HF. 1941 ; Swogh, (2) swoon, D 
799; Swow, grief, 3. 215. 

Swollen,//, proud, E 950. 

Swolow, s. gulf, L. 1 104. 

Swolwe, V. swallow, H 36. 

Swomraen./r.//. were filled with swim- 
ming things, 5. 188. 

Swonken, pp. toiled, A 4235. \ 

Swoot, s. sweat, G 578. 

Swote, adj. sweet, A 2860, 3205; //. R. 
60. See Sote, Swete. 

Swote, adv. sweetly, T. i. 158. 

Swoug-h. Swow ; see Swogh. 

Swoune, Swowne, v. swoon, faint, T. 
ii. 574; Swowned, pt. s. swooned, A 
2943 ; pp. A 913. 

Sw^ow, s. swoon; hence, anguish, 3. 215. 

Swowne, j. swoon, F 1080; Aswowne, in 
a swoon, C 245. 

Swowning", s. swooning, C 246. 

Swyn. i. swine, boar, F 1254; hog, D 460. 

Swynes-heed, s. pig's head (a term of 
abuse), A 4262. 

Swythe, adv. quickly, C 796; as sw., as 
soon, T. V. 1384; as quickly as possible, 
immediately, B 637, G 936. 

Swyve, V. lie with, A 4178; pp. dis- 
honoured, A 3850. 



Sy, saw ; pt. t. of See. 

Sye,^^^;-. to sink down, 1". v. 182. 

Sye, Syen, saw; see See. 

Syk, adj. sick, ill ; for syk, on account 
of being sick, D 394; Syke, def. F iico^ 
pi. sick persons, T. iii. 61. 

Syk, s. sigh, F 498. 

Syke, V. sigh, T. iii. 1360; Syke, ger. to 
sigh {but perhaps read syte, i. e. to grieve, 
for the rime), T. ii. 884; Syketh, pr. s. 
sighs, 5. 404 ; 22. 62 (men sigh) ; Syked, 
pt. s. sighed, A 2985; Sighte, pt. s, 
sighed, B 1035. 

Sykllche, adj. sickly, T. ii. 1528. 

Symonials, s.pl. simoniacs, I 784. 

Symonye, s. simony, D 1309. 

Syre, s. master of the house, D 713 ; mas- 
ter, 5. 12. 

Sys, 7mm. six (at dice), B 3851. 

[Syte, V. to grieve ; perhaps the right 
reading in T. li. 884.] 

Sythe, s. time, R. 80; Sythe, //. (orig. a 
gen. pi.), A 1878; ofte sythe, oftentimes, 
E 233, G 1031 ; Sythes,//. times, A 485. 

Sythe, s. scythe, L. 646. 



T', for To, frequently prefixed to verbs ; as 
tabyde, tamende, &c. 

Taa.'z'. take (Northern), A 4129. 

Tabard, .f. a herald's coat-of-arms, hence, 
(i) the same, as an inn-sign, A 20; (2) 
a ploughman's loose frock, A 541. 

Tabernacles, pi. shrines, HF. 123, 1190. 

Table, s. table, A 100; table dormaunt, 
permanent side-table, A 353 ; tablet, 
writing-tablet, 3. 780; tablet, plate, 
HF. 142; table (of the law), C 639; one 
of the thin plates on which almican- 
teras are engraved, A. ii. 21. 6; at table, 
at board, i. e. entertained as a lodger, 
G 1015 ; Tables, //. tables (for calcula- 
tion), F 1273; dining-tables, B 1442; 
writing-tablets, D 1741 ; plates, A. i. 14. 
3 ; the game of ' tables ' or back-gammon, 
F 900. 

Tabour, s. small drum, D 2268. 

Tabouren,/r.//. drum, din, L. 354. 

Tabreg-ge, for To abregge, to abridge, 
shorten, T. iii. 295. 

Tabreyde, for To abreyde, to awake, T. 
V. 520. 

Tabyde, for To abyde, to abide, T. v. 

33- 
Tache, s. defect, 21. 18. See Tecches. 
Tacheve, for To acheve, to achieve, L. 

2111. 



no 



(^loggarial hxHtx, 



Tacompte, /or To acompte, to reckon 

up, 22. 17. 

Tacord, for To accord, i. e. to agreement, 

H 98. 
Tacorde, /or To acorde, to agree, i. 27. 
Tacoye, /or To acoye, to decoy, T. v. 

782. 
Taffata, s. taffeta, A 440, 
Taffraye, /or To affraye, to frighten, E 

455- 
Taillag-es, s./>/. taxes, I 567. 
Taille, s. tally, an account scored upon 

two similarly notched sticks, A 570, B 

1606. 
Take, v. seize, T. ii, 289; present, offer, 

G 223; ^er. to take, A 34; Takestow, 

takest thou, G 435 ; Take me, i />r. s. 

betake myself, B 1985 ; Took, i //. s. 

drew in, breathed in, B i. p 3. 3 (Lat. 

hausi) ; hit, D 792 ; pt. s. handed over. 

gave, B 1484 ; had, B 192 ; Toke, 2 pt. s. 

tookest, 3. 483 ; Toke, pt. pi. took, F 

1240; received, F 356; Take, //>. taken, 

A 3007; entrusted, I 880; brought, i. 

20; Tak, 'unp. s. receive, B 117; accept 

as a result, A. ii. 25. 57 ; ta^ kepe, take 

heed, observe, B 3757; tak she, let her 

take, 5. 462 ; Taketh, imp. pi. take, 

4.9. 
Takel, s. tackle, archery-gear, arrows, A 

106. 
Tald,;2>/. told (Northern), A 4207. 
Tale, s. tale, A 3126; story, A 36, 831; 

account, B 4308 ; enumeration, E 383 ; 

I gan fitide a tale to him, I thought of 

something to say to him, 3. 536; telle 

tale, give an account of, A 330. 
Tale, V. tell a tale, talk, speak, T. iii. 

1235; Talen, ger. to tell tales, A 772; 

pr. s. subj. talk about, I 378. 
Talent, s. inclination, wish, desire, B 

2439; desire, appetite, C 540; longing, 

B 2. p I. 12. 
Taling, s. tale-telling, B 1624. 
Talig-hte, /or To alighte, i, e. to alight, 

E 909. 
Talle, adj. docile, obsequious, 4. 38. (A 

rare sense.) 
Tamende, /or To amende, to redress, E 

441. 
Tanoyen, /or To anoyen, to injure, B 

492. 
Tanswere, i. e. to answer, D 1589. 
Tapes, pi. tapes, A 3241. 
Tapicer, s. upholsterer, maker of carpets, 

A 362. 
Tapite, V. cover with tapestry, 3. 260. 
Tappe, s. tap, A 3890, 3892. 



Tappestere, s. female tapster, barmaid, 

A 241, 3336. 
Tarditas, s. slowness, I 718. 
Tare, s. tare, kind of weed, A 1570. 
Tareste,yOr To areste, to arrest, F 1370. 
Targ-e, s. target, shield, A 471; defence, 

I. 176. 
Tarien, v. tarry, B 983; delay (used 

actively), F 73 ; i pr. s. tarry, T. iii. 

1 195 ; pp. delayed, T. ii. 1739. 
Tarraye, /or To arraye, to array, arrange, 

E 961. 
Tart, adj. of sharp flavour, pungent, A 381. 
Tartre, s. tartar, G 813 ; oille 0/ Tartre, 

(probably) cream of tartar, or bitartrate 

of potassmm, A 630, 
Taryinge, s. tarrymg, delay, A 821. 
Tas, s. heap, A 1005, 1009, 1020. O. F. tas. 
Tassaille, /or To assaille, i. e. to assail, 

E 1 180. 
Tassaye, /or To assaye, to test, prove, 

try, E 454, 1075. 
Tasseled, pp. fringed, provided with 

tassels, R. 1079, A 3251. 
Tassenable, /or To assemble, to bring 

together, D 89. 
Tassoille, /or To assoile, i. e. to absolve, 

C 933- 

Tassure,/(7r To assure, B 1231. 

Tast, s. taste, relish (for), 5. 160. 

Taste, V. try, test, L. 1993; pt. s. ex- 
perienced, T. i. 639 ; imp. s. feel, G 503. 

Taughte,//. s. o/Teche. 

Tavemer, s. innkeeper, C 685. 

Tavyse, /or To avyse (me), to deliberate, 
B 1426. 

Tavirayte, /or To awayte, to dwell, remain, 

25- 7- 

Taylage, s. taxation, 9. 54. 

Tecches, //. evil qualities, defects, T. iii. 
935 ; characteristics, HF. 1778. 

Teche, v. teach, instruct, A s'^S, ger. to 
show, R. 518 ; Techen, v. direct, B 4139 ; 
ger. to inform (him of), D 1326; Taughte, 
ipt. s. taught, told, D 1050. 

Te deum, the anthem so called, D i866. 

Teer, s. tear, E 1104. 

Tehee, inter j. (denoting) laughter, hee- 
hee ! A 3740. 

Telle, V. tell, recount, relate, A 38 ; com- 
pute, 3. 440; ger. to tell, to be told, F 
447 ; I pr. s. account, B 4344 ; Telle no 
tale, set no store, 5. 326; Telles, /•/-. s. 
(Northern form), tells, 3. 73; HF. 426; 
Tolde, I //. s. counted, HF. 1380; ac- 
counted, D 203, 208; pt. pi. esteemed, 
T. i. 131 ; herd told, heard (it) told, T. i. 
197 ; Tolde,//. //. told, B 56. 



i3lo&&ma\ CntJex. 



Ill 



Tembrace, for To embrace, T. v. 224; 
E iioi. 

Temen, v. bring; temen us on bete, Vjring 
us on our bier, let us die, HF. 1744. 

Temper, s. mood, R. 346. 

Temperaunce, s. temperance, modera- 
tion, F 785. 

Tempest, s. storm, A 406; tempest (al- 
luding to a passage in Statins), A 884. 

Tempest thee, imp. s. violently distress 
thyself, 13. 8 ; 2 pr. s. subj. vex, perturb, 

B 2. P4-75- ^ .. 

Tempestous, adj. tempestuous, T. n. 5. 
Temple, s. inn of court, A 567. 
Tem.pred.e, pt. s. modulated, B 3, m 12. 

22; pp. tempered, G 926. (In alchemy, 

to temper is to adjust or moderate heat.) 
Temips, s. tense ; futur temps, future 

tense, time to come, G 875. 
Temptour, s. tempter, D 1655. 
Ten, ten, A 454; ten so wood, ten times as 

mad, L. 735. 
Tenbrace, to embrace, B 1891. 
Tencresen, to increase, E 1808. 
Tendure, to endure, E 756, 811. 
Tendyte, for To endyte, to compose, 

vvrite, T. i. 6 ; to relate, A 1209. 
Tene, s. vexation, A 3106; sorrow, grief, 

T. V. 240 ; cross, trouble, T. ii. 61. A. S, 

feona. 
Tenour, s. outline of the story, L. 929. 
Tenquere, /fr To enquere, to ask, E 1543. 
Tenspyre, for To enspyre, i. e. to in- 
spire, G 1470. 
Tenthe, tenth, HF. 63, iii; Tenthe 

some, company of ten, T. ii. 1249. 

(Sometimes tenthe some means ' ten in 

all.') 
Tentifly, adv. attentively, carefully, E 

334- 

Tercel, adj. male (of an eagle), 5. 393, 
449 ; pi. 5. 540 ; as s. male eagle, 5. 405. 

Tercelet, s. male falcon, 5. 529, 533; F 
504, 621 ; Tercelets, //. male birds of 
prey, 5. 659 ; male hawks, F 648. 
' Tiercelet, m. the tassell, or male of 
any kind of hawke, so tearmed, be- 
cause he is, commonly, a third part 
lesse then the female ' ; Cotgrave. 

Tere, s. tear, B 3251. 

Tere, v. tear, B 1326; scratch, R. 325; 
Torn,//. L. 2103. 

Terins, s. pi. tarins, siskins, R. 665. F. 
tarin. 

Terme, s. set time, appointed time, T. v. 
696; period, space of time, 'term,' a 
portion of the zodiac, being one-third 
of a ' sign,' or lo'^, F 1288 ; (during the) 



term, A 1029 ; terme of his lyvc, while 
he lives, G 1479 ; /// terme, in set phrases, 
C311 ; pi. pedantic phrases, A 323; legal 
jargon, R. 199; periods, A 3028; terms, 
C 51, F 1266. 

Terme-day, s. appointed day, 3. 730. 

Termyne, v. determine, express in ' good 
set terms,' 5. 530. 

Terrestre, adj. earthly, E 1332. 

Terve./r. s. subj. flay, G 1274 {so in MS. 
E.) ; Terved {not Terned), pp. skinned, 
G 1 171 {so in MS. E.). This is certainly 
the right word; in G 1171, read terved 
[not torned\ and. in G 1274, read terve 
[not torne\ See my letter in the Athe- 
naeum, Mar. 24, 1894. So in Havelok, 
603, for tirneden read tirueden — tirve- 
den, i. e. rolled back. 

Tery, adj. tearful, T. iv. 821. 

Tescape, to escape, F 1357. 

Tespye, for To espye, to spy out, espy, 
B 1989, 4478. 

Testers, pi. head-pieces, A 2499. 

Testes, s. pi. vessels for assaying metals 
(Tyrvvhitt), G 818. 

Testif , adj. heady, headstrong, T. v. 802 ; 
A 4004. 

Tete, s. teat, A 3704. 

Texpounden, to expound, B 1716. 

Text, s. text, quotation from an author, 
B 45 ; saying, A 177, 182 ; text (as op- 
posed to a gloss), 3. 333. 

Textuel, a^'. well versed in texts, learned, 
H 235 ; I 57. 

Teyd, //. tied, bound, E 2432. 

Teyne, s. a thin plate of metal, G 1225, 
1229. Lat. tcenia. 

Th', for The ; common, as in thabsence, 
for the absence, 

Thabsence, the absence, A 1239. 

Thadversitee, the adversity, E 756. 

Thakketh, pr. s. strokes, pats, D 1559. 
A. S. paccian. 

Thalighte, for Thee alighte ; in thee 
alighte, alighted in thee, B 1660. 

Thank, s. expression of thanks, A 612; 
thanks, E 2388 ; can th., owes thanks, 
A 1808; his th., the thanks to him, 
L. 452; my thankes, by my goodwill, 
willingly, R. 1666; his thankes, of his 
free will, willingly, A 1626; hir thankes, 
of their own will, A 2114. 

Thanke, i pr. s. thank, E 1088; Th. hit 
thee, thank thee for it, 10. 51. 

Thanne, adv. then, D 2004, I 104; Than, 
then, A 12; next, 5.324; cr than, sooner 
than, before, G 899. 

Thar, pr. s. impers. (it) is necessary, is 



112 



(^lossartal Intiei. 



needful ; thar ye, it is needful that ye, 
B 2258 ; thar thee, it is needful for thee, 
you need, or thou needst, D 329, 336, 
1365, H 352 ; hiyn thar, it is needful for 
him, he needs, T. ii. i66i ; he must, 
A 4320 ; Thurte, pt. s. ; th. him, he 
needed, R. 1089, 1324; yow thurfte, you 
would need, you need, T. iii. 572. 

Tharivaile, the arrival, the landing, 
HF.4SI. 

Tharmes, the arms, armorial bearings, 
HF. 1411. 

Tharray, the array, A 716. 

Tliascry,/?^ The ascry, the alarm, T. ii. 
611. 

Thassay, the assay, the endeavour, 5. 2. 

Thasseg-e, the siege, T. iv. 1480; the 
besieging force, T. iv. 62. 

Thassemblee, the assembly, B 403. 

Thassembling-e, the assembling, B 2431. 

That, 7-el.pron. that which, whom, 3. 979; 
that of, from whom, 3. 964; That oon, 
the one, A 4013 ; That other, the other, 
A 4013; That, with reference to whom, 
G 236; if that, if, 3. 969, 971. 

Thaventayle, for The aventayle, the 
mouthpiece of a helmet, T. v. 1558. 

Thavision, for The avision, tlie vision, 
3- 285. 

Thavys, the advice, A 3076. 

The, def art. K 2, &ic. 

The ; as in The bet, by so much the 
better, 3. 668 ; The las, by so much the 
less, 3. 675. 

The,yo;- The.e,pers.pron. F 676, &c. 

Theatre, s. theatre, area for a tourna- 
ment, A 1885. 

Thedom, s. success, B 1595. 

Thee, v. thrive, prosper, R. 1067 ; never 
mot she thee, may she never prosper, 
5. 569 ; mot he never thee, may he never 
prosper, T. ii. 670 ; lat him never thee, 
let him never prosper, B 4622 ; thou 
shalt never thee, E 1388 ; he shal never 
thee, G 641 ; also moot I thee, as I may 
thrive, as I hope to prosper, D 1215, 
E 1226; so fnoot I thee, D 361 ; as mote 
I thee, T. i. 341 ; so theech, for so thee ich, 
as I may thrive, as I hope to prosper, 
C 947, G 929 ; so theek, for so thee ik, as 
I hope to prosper, A 3864. 

Theef, s. thief, robber, D 1338, 

Theefly, adv. like a thief, L. 1781. 

Theffect, for The effect, the result, A 
1189; the substance, pith, L. 1180, 2403; 
the matter, contents, 2. 56; the source, 
D 1451; the moral, B 2148; the sum (of 
the matter) , A 2366. 



Theg-le, the eagle, B 3573, 

Their, the air, D 1939. 

Thembassadours, the ambassadors, T, 
iv. 140, 145. 

Theme, s. text, thesis, C 333, 425. 

Themperour, the emperor, 3. 368. 

Then, conj. than, L. 1693, 2092. 

Thencens, the incense, A 2277, 2938. 

Thenchauntements, pi. the enchant- 
ments, A 1944. 

Thenche, v. imagine, A 3253. 

Thencheson, for The encheson, the 
reason, cause, T. v. 632. 

Thencrees, the increase, A 275. 

Thende, the end, B 423, 965, 3269. 

Theng-endring, the engendring, the pro- 
cess of production, HF. 968. 

Theng-yn, the (warlike) engine, HF. 

1934- 
Thenke, v. think of, 5. 311 ; i pr. s. think, 

intend, E 641 ; Thenkestow, thinkest 

thou, T. iv. 849, 1088; Thoghte, 1 pt. s. 

thought, 3. 448 ; Thenke on, think of, 

16. 47. 
Thenne, adj. thin, A 4066. 
Thenne, adv. then, T. ii. 210. 
Thenne, adv. thence, D 1141. 
Thennes, adv. thence, i. e. away from 

that place, T. iv. 695 ; thence, R. 791 ; 

as s. the place that, G 66. 
Thenne s-forth, adv. thenceforth, B 1755. 
Thentencioun, the intention, G 1443. 
Thentente, for The entente, the design, 

B 930; the purpose, end, G 1306; the 

meaning, T. v. 1630. 
Thentree, the entrance, A 1983. 
Thenvyous, for The envyous, the spite- 
ful, malicious, 3. 642. 
Theolog-ie, s. theology, I 1043, 
Theorik, s. theory, theoretical explana- 
tion, A pr. 98. 
Ther, adv. there, B 62, 1190, &c. ; where, 

T. ii. 618; when, B 474; whither, at 

which, B 469; whereas, D 1213, G 724; 

wherefore, T. iii. 1437 ; wherever, D 128 ; 

as to which, T. ii. 588 ; wherefore (I pray 

that), D 1561. 
Ther-aboute, adv. about it, D 1837; 

therein, G 832; round it, A 937. 
Therafter, adv. afterwards, 3. 66. 
Ther-ag-ayns, prep, against that, I 665; 

in reply, T. ii. 369. 
Ther-as, Ther as, there where, where, 

B2384; there, I 162; whereas, D 1177 ; 

where that, A 34, 172; when thaV L. 

1277; Ther-as that, where, i. 160; Ther 

that, where, F 267. 
Therbe, the herb, HF. 290. 



(glossarial IntJex. 



iij 



Ther-bifore, adv. before that time, D 631 ; 
beforehand, E 689, 729. 

Ther-biforn, adv. beforehand, A 2034; 
previously, A 3997. 

Therby, by it, to it, D 984; into posses- 
sion of it, F 1115; beside it, R. 1184. 

Ther-fore, adv. therefore, A 189 ; for that 
purpose, A 809 ; on that account, L, 
1863; on that point, E 1141 ; for it, L. 

1391- 

Therfro, therefrom, from it, HF. 895. 

Ther-inne, therein, in it, B 1945, 3573- 

Ther-of, adv. with respect to that, E 644; 
concerning that, 3. 1132; A 462; from 
that, 3, 1166; thereby, I 314; of it, 20. 8. 

Ther-on, a^'v. thereupon, A 160; thereof, 

Ther-oute, adv. out there, out m the open 
air, B 3362; outside there, G 1136. 

Therthe, the earth, R. 1423. 

Therto, adv. besides, moreover, D 1251 ; 
to it, 2. 100; likewise, R. 1262. 

Ther-upoa. adv. immediately, A 819. 

Ther-whyles, whilst, B 5. p 6. 250. 

Tberwith, adv. withal, for all that, 3. 954 ; 
moreover, F 931 ; thereupon, 3. 275 ; at 
the same time, B 3210. 

Ther-with-al, thereupon, A 1078 ; there- 
with, with it, by means of it, A 566; 
beside it, besides, R. 226; at once, L. 
148 ; thereat, L. 864. 

Theschaunge, the exchange, T. iv. 146. 

Thesche'wing', the avoiding (of any- 
thing), 5. 140. 

Thestat, the estate, the rank, condition, 
A 716. 

Thewed, //. ; wel thewed, of good dis- 
position, 4. 180. 

Thewes, s. pi. habits, natural qualities, 
E 409, 1542; good qualitifs, virtues, 
G loi ; customs, habits, manners, T. ii. 
723; morals, HF. 1834. 

Tbexcellent, the excellent, B 150. 

Thexcuse. thee excuse, D 161 1. 

Thexecucion, the execution, 10. 65. 

Thexp6ri6nce, the experience, E 2238. 

Thider, adv. thither, A 1263. 

Thider-ward, adv. thither, A 2530. 

Thikke, adj. thick, A 549 ; stout, plump, 

A 3973- 
Thikke, adv. thickly, R. 1396. 
Thikke-herd, adj. thick-haired, A 2518. 
Thikke-sterred,' adj. thickly covered 

with stars, A. ii. 23. 2. 
Thilke, that, R, 660, &c. ; such a, A 182; 

that same, A 1193; that sort of, I 50; 

fl. those, HP". 173. 
Tliirtiage, the image, L. 1760. 



Thing', s. fact, C 156; property, wealth, 
R. 206 ; deed, legal document, A 325 ; 
for any thing, at any cost, A 276; Thing,^ 
//. things, L. II, 2140; Thinges, //. 
things, A 175 ; matters of business, B 
1407; poems, L. 364; pieces of music, 
F 78 ; services, prayers, B 1281. 

Thingot, the ingot, G 1233. 

Thinke, v. seem, T. i. 405; Thinketh, 
pr. s. impers. (it) seems, B 1901 ; me th., 
it seems to me, A 37, 2207 ; hoiv th. yow, 
how does it seem to you, D 2204; 
Thoghte, pt. s. impers. (it) seemed, L. 
1697 ; 77ie thoughte, it seemed to me, A 
385; hijn th.. It seemed to him, A 682; 
us th., it seemed to us, A 785 ; hir th., it 
seemed to her, D 965, 967. 

Thinne, adj. thin, A 679 ; poor, feeble, 
9.36; E1682; scanty, limited, G. 741. 

Thirleth, /;-. s. pierces, 7. 211; pp. A 
2710. 

This, A 175, &c.; contracted form of \\\\% 
is, T. ii, 363, iii. 936, v. 151 ; This is, 
pronounced this, 5. 411, 620; A 1091, 
D 91; Thise (dhiiz),//. (monosyllabic), 
A 701, B 59, &c, 

Tho, //. those, A 498, 1123, 2351, 3246. 

Tho, adv. then, at that time, A 993, 3329, 
&c. ; still, 3. 1054. 

Thoccident, the Occident, the west, B 
3864. 

Thofflce, the office, the duty, B 2863. 

Thoght, s. anxiety, B 1779, E 80. 

Thoghtful, adj. moody, I 677. 

Tholde, pi. the old, D 857. 

Tholed. //. suffered, D 1546. A. S. polian^ 

Thombe, s. thumb, A 563. 

Thonder, s. thunder, A 492. 

Thonder-dint, s. stroke of lightning, 
D 276 ; -dent, thunder-clap, A 3807. 

Thonder-leyt, s. thunder-bolt, B i. m 4. 
12 ; lightning, I 839. 

Thonke. \pr. s. thank, E 380. 

Thon6ur, the honour, B 1767, E 1449. 

Thorgh, prep, through, 5. 127, 129. 

Thorient, the orient, the east, B 3871, 

3883. 
Thoriginal, the original, L. 1558. 
Thorisonte, the horison, E 1797, F 1017. 
Thorisoun, the orison, the prayer, A 

2261. 
Thorpes,//, villages, 5. 350. 
Thorugh-passen,/r./i/. penetrate, B 4. 

m 3. 49. 
Thought, s. anxiety, T. i. 579. 
Thounabe, s. thumb, A. i. i. 2. 
Thourgh-girt, //>. struck through, T. iv. 

627. From M.^.gu7deii, to strike. 



E3 



114 



(3\o&mxia\ 3Intiex. 



Thral, s. thrall, slave, subject, servant, 

B 3343, C 183, D 155. 
Tliral, adj. enthralled, A 1552, I 137 ; 

Thralle,//. enthralled, B 2751 ; Thral, as 

p/., L. 1940. 
Thraldom, s. slavery, B 286, 338. 
Thralle, v. subject, T. i. 235; subjugate, 

R. 882. 
Thraste,//. s. thrust, T. ii. 1155. 
Threde, v. thread, R. 99. 
Threed, s. thread, A 2030; thread (of 

destiny), T. v. 7. 
Threpe, i pr. pi. (we) call, assert to be, 

G 826. A. S. preapian. 
ThresMold, s. threshold, A 3482. 
Threste, v. thrust, push, A 2612; pt. pi. 

vexed, 17. iv. 254. 
Threte, v. threaten, L. 754. 
Threting', s. menace, G 698. 
Thretty, adj. thirty, F 1368. 
Thridde, third, A 1463, 2271. 
Thrift, s. success, welfare, T. ii. 847; 

profit, success, G 739, 1425 ; good thrift 

bad, prayed for the welfare (of) , blessed, 

T. iii. 1249 ; by my thrift, if I succeed, 

T. ii. 1483. 
Thriftieste, most successful, T. i. 1081 ; 

most thriving, T. ii. 737. 
Thriftily, adv. carefully, A 105; profit- 
ably, A 3131 ; encouragingly, F 1174. 
Thrifty, adj. profitable (to the buyer), 

B 138 ; serviceable, D 238 ; provident, 

7. 197. 
Thring-e, v. press, T. iv. 66 ; Throng, pt. s. 

forced his way, 7. 55 ; thrust, E 2353. 
Thriste, pt. s. thrust, T. iii. 1574. 
Thrittene, thirteen, D 2259. 
Thritty, thirtv, E 1421. 
Throf , pt. s. o'f Thxyve. 
Throng-,//, s. ^/"Thringe. 
Throp, s. thorp, small village, E 199, 208. 
Throstel, s. throstle, song-thrush, 5. 364. 
Throte, s. throat, 3. 945. 
Throte-boUe, s. ball of the throat, ' the 

protuberance in the throat called Adam's 

apple,' A 4273. 
Through-out, quite through, 11. 3. 
Throwe, s. short space of time, while, 

period, B 953, 3326, 
Throwe, ger. to throw, T. ii. 971 ; Threw, 

//. s. T. iii. 184; Threwe, //. pi. R. 786; 

Throwe, />/. thrown, L. i960; Throwen, 

pp. cast, HF. 1325 ; twisted, turned, 

T. iv. 1 159. 
Throwes, />/. torments, T. v. 206; throes, 

T. V. 1201. 
Thrustel, s. thrush, B 1963. 
Thrusteth, pr. s. thirsts, yearns, L. 103. 



Thrustle-cok, s. male thrush, B 1959. 
Thrye, adv. thrice, T. ii. 89, 463. 
Thryes, adv. thrice, A 63, 463. 
Thry ve, v. thrive, prosper, E 172 ; ger. 

G 141 1 ; so thr. I, as I hope to thrive, 

D 1764; Throf, pt. s. flourished, B 3. 

m 4. 5. 
Thryvinge, adj. vigorous, B 5. m 4. 24 

(Lat. uigens^. 
Thunworthiest, the unworthiest, 22. 19. 
Thurfte, pt. s. impers. (with yow), you 

would need, vou need, T. iii. 572. See 

Thar. 
Thurgh, prep, through, i. 27 ; by means 

of A 920. 
Thurgh-darted, pp. transfixed with a 

dart, T. i. 325. 
Thurghfare, s. thoroughfare, A 2847. 
Thurgh-girt, pp. pierced through, A 

loio. 
Thurghout, prep, throughout, F 46 ; all 

through, B 256, 464; quite through, C 

655- 
Thurgh-shoten, pp. shot through, T. i. 

325. 
Thurrok, s. sink, the lowest internal 

part of a ship's hull, I 363, 715. A. S. 

purriic. 
Thurst, s. thirst, B 100, 
Thursteth, pr. s. thirsts, T. v, 1406 ; //. s. 

inipers. he was thirsty, B 3229. 
Thurte ; see Thar. 
Thwitel, s. large knife, whittle, A 3933. 
Thwyte, pr. pi. whittle, cut up for, HF. 

1938 ; Thwiten, pp. carved, whittled, R. 

933- 
Tid, pp. of Tyde. 

Tidifs, s. pi. small birds, F 648. Cf. Eng. 

titmouse, titlark. See Tydif . 
Tikel, adj. unstable, A 3428. 
Tikelnesse, s. instability, 13. 3. 
Tikled,//. s. tickled, D 395. 
Til {before a vowel), prep, to, A 180; as a 

Northern word {before a consonant) , A 

41 10; Til and fra.toandfro (Northern), 

A 4039. I eel. til. 
Til, conj. until, A 1760 ; til that, A 1490, F 

360. 
Tilyere, -f. tiller, B 5. p i. 86. 
Timber, s. material, T. iii, 530. 
Timbestre, s. female timbrel-player, 

tambourine-player, R. 769. 
Timbres, s. pi. timbrels, tambourines, R. 

772. 
Tipet, s. tippet, cape, A 233. 
Tiptoon,//. tiptoes, B 4497. 
Tissew, s. a band, T. ii. 639. 
Tit,/r. s. betides, T. i. 333. See Tyde. 



#lo0sarial hxHcx, 



1 i 



Titering, s, hesitation, vacillation, T. ii. 
1744. 

Titlelees, adj. without a title, usurping, 
H 223. 

To (too) , s. toe, A 2726 ; Toon, />/. B 4052 ; 
Toos, />/. B 4370. 

To (t66), pre/), to, A 2; gone to, A 30; 
(used after its case), G 1449 ; for, 1. 184; 
as to, as for, L. 2096; /ihu to, for him, 3. 
771 ; fo that, until, 4. 239. 

To, adv. too, B 2129 ; moreover, beside, T. 
i. 540; overmuch, G 1423; to badde, too 
evil, very evil, L. 2597. 

To- (i), intensive prefix, lit. in twain, asun- 
der. A. S. to-, G. zer-. 

To- (2), prepositional prefix, as in To-forn. 
A. S. to-, G. ZU-. 

To-bete, v. beat amain, T. v. 1762; beat 
severely, G 405. 

To-breke, v. break in pieces ; pr. s. (it) 
breaks in pieces, R. 277; breaks asun- 
der, G 907; is violently broken, HF. 
779; To-broken, pp. broken in pieces, 
destroyed, 16. i ; To-broke, pp. broken 
in half, D 277 ; severely bruised, A 4277. 

To-breste, v. burst in twain, T. ii. 608; 
pr. s. subj. may (she) break in twain, T. 
iv. 1546; may be broken in twain, i. 16; 
pr. pi. break in pieces, A 261 1 ; To- 
brosten,/i/>. broken in twain, A 2691. 

To-cleve, v. cleave in twain, T. v. 613. 

To-dasshte,//. J. dashed violently about, 
R. 337 ; pp. much bruised, T. ii. 640. 

Tode, s. toad, I 636. 

To-drawen, pr. pi. allure, B 4. m 3. 46 ; 
To-drowen, //. pi. tore in pieces, B i. 
p 3. 42; To-drawen, pp. distracted, B i. 

P 5- 76. 
To-driven,//, scattered, L. 1280. 
To-forn, prep, before, F 268 ; god to-forn, 

in God's sight, T. i. 1049. 
To-forn, adv. in front, beforehand, B 5. 

p 6. 300. 
To-geder, adv. together, 5. 555 ; To-gider, 

B 3222; To-gidre, A 824. 
Tog-ht, adj. taut, D 2267. 
To-go, pp. dispersed, L. 653. 
To-greve, v. grieve excessively, T. i. 

lOOI. 

To-hangen, v. put to death by hanging, 

HF". 1782. 
To-hepe, adv. (lit. into a heap), together, 

T. iii. 1764 ; L. 2009. 
To-he wen, />;-.//. hew in twain, A 2609; 

pp. exit, through, T. ii. 638; To-hewe, //. 

hewn in pieces, B 430. 
Toke, 2pt. s. tookest, 3. 483; pf.pl. took, 

F 1240 ; received, F 356. 



To-laug'h, pr. s. laughs out, laughs exces- 
sively, T. ii. 1 108. (Short iox to-laugheth.) 

Told, -e ; see Telle. 

Tollen (i), v. take toll. A 562. 

Tollen (2), V. attract, entice, B 2. p 7. 18. 

Tombesteres, s. pi. fern, dancing girls, 
lit. female tumblers, C 477. A. S. tum- 
bian, to tumble, dance. 

Tomblinge, pres. pt. as adj. fleeting, 
transitory, 13 2. m 3. 21 (Lat. caducis). 

To-melte, v. melt utterly, T. iii. 348. 

Tonge, s. tongue, 3. 930; A 265; dat. 
speech, language, 16. 21. 

Tonged,/>/. tongued, 3. 927. 

Tonges, s. pi. tongs, I 555. 

Tonne, s. tun, barrel, cask, A 3894. 

Tonne-greet, adj. great as a tun, A 1994. 

Toon, Toos, pi. of To, s. 

Tooth-ake, s. toothache, R. 1098. 

Top, s. top, A 2915; top (of the mast), 
main-top, L. 639; tuft of hair, C 255; 
top (of the head), A 590; crown (of the 
head),T. iv. 996; Top and tail, begin- 
ning and end, HF. 880. 

To-race, pr.pl. subj. tear in pieces, E 572. 
Here race is probably short for arace, to 
tear up. 

Tord, s. piece of dung, B 2120, C 955. 

To-rende, pr. pi. subj. tear in pieces, T. 
ii. 790; To-rente, pt. s. distracted, T. iv. 
341 ; rent asunder, B 3215 ; tore in 
pieces, L. 820; To-rent, //. rent in 
pieces, C 102, E 1012. 

Torets, //. small rings on the collar of a 
dog, A 2152. See Turet. 

Tormentinge, s. torture, E 1038. 

T6rnient6ur, s. tormentor, 10. 18 ; exe- 
cutioner, B 818. 

Tormentrye, s. torture, D 251. 

Tormentyse, s. torment, B 3707. 

Torn, s. turn, C 815. 

Tornen, v. turn, G 1403; return, A 
1488. 

Torney, s. tourney, T. iv. 1669. 

To-romblen, v. rumble, crash, I^. 1218. 

Tortuos, adj. lit. tortuous, i. e. oblique, 
applied to the six signs of the zodiac 
(Capricorn to Gemini), which ascend 
most rapidly and obliquely; Tortuous, 
B 302. 

To-scatered,//. dispersed, D 1969. 

To-shake, pp. shaken to pieces, L. 962 ; 
tossed about, L. 1765. 

To-shivered, pp. been destroyed, 5. 493. 

To-shrede, pr. pi. cut into shreds, A 
2609. 

To-slitered, pp. slashed with numerous 
cuts, R. 840. 



ii6 



(^lo00arial Untiex. 



To-sterte, v. start asunder, burst, T. ii. 
980. 

To-stoupe, V. stoop forwards, D 1560. 

To-swinke, pr. pi. labour greatly, C 519. 

To-tar, pt. s. tore in pieces, rent, B 3801. 

Totelere, subst. as adj. tattling, tale- 
bearing, L. 353. 

To-tere, pr. pi. rend, tear in pieces, C 
474; To-tar, //. -c. rent, B 3801; To-tore, 
pp. G 635 ; To-torn, pp. much torn, 5. 
no; defaced, T. iv. 358; dishevelled, R. 

327. 
Tother ; the tother {for that other) , the 

other, L. 325 a. 
To-trede, v.; al to-trede, trample under 

foot, I 864. 
Toty, adj. dizzy, A 4253. Spenser has 

totty ; F. Q. vii. 7. 39. 
Touching-e, s. touch, I 207. 
Tough, adj. troublesome, pertinacious, in 

phr. make it tough, to behave in a 

troublesome, pertinacious, and forward 

manner, T. v. loi ; made it tough, was 

captious, 3. 531 ; behaved pertinaciously, 

T. iii. 87. 
Toumbling', adj. perishing, B 3. p 9. 168. 

See Tombling-e. 
Toun, s. town, A 217; farm, B 4138; 

neighbourhood, R. 446. 
Tour, s. tower, F 176; tower (of London), 

A 3256; mansion (in astrology), 4. 113. 

(In B 2096, the sense is that his crest 

was a miniature tower, with a hly 

above it.) 
Touret, s. turret, A 1909. 
Tourne, v. turn, T. ii. 688 ; return, D 

988. 
Tourneying-e, .f. tournament, R. 1206. 
Tourneyment, s. tournament, B 1906. 
Tourning, s. turning round, R. 761. 
Toute, s. buttocks, backside, A 3812, 3853. 
Toverbyde, ger. to survive, D 1260. 
Towayle, s. towel, cloth, R. 161 ; Towaille, 

B 3935. 3943- 

Towne ; out oft., away, T. iii. 570, 577, 
109 1. 

To-wonde, />/. s. {with substitution of the 
weak for the strong form, as in abreyde), 
flew in pieces, became broken, 4. 102. 
The form towoud, flew in pieces, occurs 
in Sir Ferumbras, 2568. 

To-yere, adv. this year, HF. 84; D 168. 

Trace, s. trace, steps, 14. 3; Traas, pro- 
cession, L. 285. 

Trace, i pr. pi. go, 5. 54. 

Trad, pt. s. of Trede. 

Tragedien, s. writer of tragedy, B 3. 
p6. 3. 



Traisoun, s. treason, B 4307. 
Traitorye, treachery, B 781. 
Traitour, s. traitor, HF. 267. 
Translate!!, ger. to translate, L. 370 ; pp. 

changed, dressed afresh, E 385. 
Transmuwe, v. transform, T. iv. 467; 

pp. T. iv. 830. 
Transporter!, v. extend, B i. p 4. 241. 
Trappe, s. trap, snare, A 145; trap-door, 

entrance, T. iii. 741. 
Trapped, pp. furnished with trappings, A 

2890. 
Trappe-dore, s. trap-door, T. iii. 759. 
Trappures, //. trappings for horses, A 

2499. 
Traunce, s. trance, A 1572 ; half-conscious 

state, B 3906; brown study, D 2216. 
Traunce, ger. to tramp about, T. iii. 690. 
Trave, s. wooden frame for holding un- 
ruly horses, A 3282. O. F. iref, from Lat. 

ace. trabem, beam. 
Travers, s. 'traverse,' a curtain, screen, 

T. iii. 674; E 1817. 
Trayed, pt. s. betrayed, HF. 390; L. 2486, 
Trays, s. traces, T. i. 222; A 2139. O. F. 

trais, pi. of trait, a trace. Tlie E. traces 

is a double plural. 
Tray sen, ger. to betray, T. iv. 438. 
Trayteresse, s. fern, traitress, 3. 620, 

813. 
Tray tour, s. traitor, A 1130; gen. pi. of 

traitors, hence traitorous, C 896. 
Trecherye, s. treachery, trickery, B 

4520. 
Trechoures,//. traitors. R. 197. 
Trede, ipr.pl. tread, A 3022; Tret, /r. s.. 

treads, D 2002; Trad. pt. s. trode, B 

4368; Trodan, pt.pl. HF. 2153; Troden, 

pp. stepped, C 712. 
Trede-foul, s. treader of fowls, B 3135, 

4641. 
Trag6die, s, tragedy, sad story, T. v. 

1786. 
Tregetour, s. a juggler who used me- 
chanical contrivances, HF. 1277; //. F 

1141. 
Trench, s. a hollow walk, alley, F 392. 

F. trancher, to cut. 
Trenchant, adj. cutting, sharp, A 3930. 
Trenden, v. revolve, B 3. m 11. 4. 
Trentals, pi. (sets of) thirty masses for 

the dead, D 1717, 1724. 
Tresor, s. treasure, wealth, B 442, C 779. 
Tresorere, j. treasurer, i. 107 ; 19. 18. 
Tresorie, s. treasury, HF. 524. 
Trespas, s. wrong, B 2547 ; transgression, 

L. 408, 463. 
Trespassours, s.pl. offenders, B 2548. 



(§lo00arial ]Inti£i. 



117 



Tresse, s. a (three-fold) plait (of hair), 

R. 779; HF. 230; A 1049. 
Tresse, g-er. to dress (my) hair, to plait, 

R. 599; //. plaited, D 344. 
Tressour, s. head-dress, R. 568. Proba- 
bly a ' caul,' or net of gold tifiread. 
Tret, pr. s. o/Trede. 
Tretable, adj. tractable, docile, I 658; 

yielding, L. 411; inclinable, 3. 923; in- 
clined to talk, 3. 533. 
Trete, v. treat, T. iv. 58 ; treat of. tell, 5. 

34; ^er, to speak, converse, C 64; pp. 

explained, B 5. p i. 3. 
Tretee, s. treaty, A 1288; discussion, F 

1219; agreement, E 1892. 
Tretis, s. treaty, B 233 ; account, T. ii. 

1697 ; treatise, A. pr. 5 ; story, B 2147. 
Tretys, adj. well-proportioned, long, A 

152; weli-fashi(jned, R. 1016; graceful, 

R. 932. O. F. tretis. 
Trewe, adj. true, A 531 ; honest, L. 464 ; 

/>/. the faithful, B 456. 
Tre"we, adv. correctly, 8, 4. 
Trewe, s. truce, T. iii. 1779, iv. 58 ; Trewes, 
. pi. the days of truce, T, v. 401. 
Trewe love, s. true-love (probably a leaf 

of herb pans or some aromatic confec- 
tion), A 3692. 
Trewely, adv. truly, certainly, A 481. 
Trewer, adj. truer, 6. 117. 
Trewer, adv. more truly, 3. 927. 
Treweste, adj. superl. truest, F 1539. 
Treye, num. ' tray," three, C 653. 
Triacle, s. a sovereign remedy, B 479, C 

314. O. F. triacle. 
Irik.led, pt. p/. trickled, B 1864. 
Trille, v. turn, twirl, F 316. Cf. Swed. 

trilla, to turn round. 
Trip, s. small piece, D 1747. 
Trippe, v. dance, A 3328 ; ger. to trip, to 

move briskly with the feet, F 312. 
Trist, s. trust, T, i. 154, iii. 403. 
Triste, s. tryst, station, T. ii. 1534. 
Triste, v. trust, L. 333; ger. to trust (to), 

L. 1885. 
Tristicia, sadness, I 725. 
Troden; see Trede. 
Trog-h, s. trough. A 3627. 
Trompe, .r. trumpet, L. 635. 
Tromped, pt. s. sounded the trumpet, E 

1719. 
Trompes, pi. trumpeters, 7. 30; A 2671. 
Tronchoun, s. broken shaft of a spear, 

A 2615. O. F. ironchon. 
Trone, ^.throne. A 2529; throne (of God), 

heaven, C 842. 
Tropik, s. the turning-point, a name for 

the solstitial points. A, i. 17. 13. 



Tropos, s. a turning; but interpreted by 
mean 'agaynward,' i.e. 



1538. 
m 2. 

B I. 

537; 



Chaucer to 

backward, A. 1. 17. 13. 
Trotteth, pr. s. trots, i.e. goes, is, E 
Troublable, adj. disturbing, B 4. 

12. 
Trouble, adj. tempestuous, turbid, 

m 7. 3 ; dull, H 279 ; disturbed, I 

anxious, E 465 ; vexed, 6, 133. 
Troubly, adj. cloudy, obscure, B 4. m 5. 

35- 
Trouthe, s. truth, A 46; fidehty, L. 267; 

troth, promise, A 1610. 
Trowen, v. believe, HF. 699 ; i pr. s. trow, 

believe, imagine, A 155 ; Irowestow, 

dost thou think, B i. p 3. 24. 
Troyewardes, to, towards Troy, T. i. 59. 
Trufles, s.pl. trifles, I 715. 
Trumpen, v. blow the trumpet, HF. 1243. 
Trussed, pp. packed, A 681. 
Truwe, s. truce, T. iv. 1312, 1314. 
Tryce, v. pull, drag away, B 3715. Cf. E. 

trice up (nautical term). 
Trye, adj. choice, excellent. B 2046. 
Tryne compas, the threefold world, con- 
taining earth, sea, and heaven, G 45. 
Tubbe, J-. tub, A 3621. 
Tuel, s. pipe, slender chimney, HF. 1649. 

O. F. tuel, F. tuyau. 
Tukked, //, tucked, A 621. 
Tulle, v. entice, allure, A 4134. 
Tung-e, s. tongue, i. 128. 
Turet, s. the eye in which the ring of the 

astrolabe turned, A. i. 2. i. Cotgrave 

has ' Touret, the little ring by which a 

Hawkes lune or leash is fastened unto 

the jesses.' See Torets. 
Turrdent, s. torment, R. 274. 
Turmente, ^^r. to vex, L. 871. 
Turne, ger. to turn, A 2454; v. turn (in a 

lathe), A 3928; Turnen, v. return, L. 

2619 ; pp. at an end, 3. 689. 
Turneying-e, s. tournament, A 2557 ; 

mock tournament. R. 1407. 
Turtel. s. turtle-dove, A 3706, E 2080. 
Turves, s. pi. turf-plots, patches of turf, 

L. 204 ; E 2235. 
Tusked, provided with tusks, F 1254. 
Tuskes,//. tusks, T. v. 1238. 
Tuwel, s. hole, D 2148. See Tuel. 
Twelf , twelve, C 30. 
Twelfmonth, s. twelvemonth, year, A 

651, D 909. 
Twelfte, adj. twelfth, 4. 139. 
Tweye, two, A 704, 792; Twey, B 2203; 

tw. and tw., in pairs, A 898. 
Twey fold, adj. double, G 566. 
Tweyne, twain, 2. 76; 4. 95. 



ii8 



(^lossarial Kntiex, 



Twig-ges, s.pl. twigs, HF. 1936. 

T"wiglite, pt. s. twitched, drew quickly, 
T. iv. 1185; Twight, pp. distraught, (Ht. 
twitched), T. iv. 572; pulled, D 1563. 
The infin. is hvicchen. 

T-V5^inkeling', s. twinkling, 4, 222; mo- 
mentary blinking, E 37. 

Twinkled, //. //. twinkled, A 267 ; pp. 
winked, B 2. p 3. 79. 

Twinne, v. sever, part, T. iv. 1197; tw. 
froiti his wit, lose his mind, 7. 102 ; de- 
part, B 3195, F 577 ; ger. to separate, 
B 517 ; to depart (from), C 430. 

Twinninge, s. separation, T. iv. 1303. 

Twiste, s. (i) twist, tendril, T. iii. 1230; 
(2) twig, spray, E. 2349. 

Twiste, V. wring, torment, F 566; i //. s. 
tortured, D 494; //. s. wrung, E 2005; 
Twiste, pt. s. subj. would compel, con- 
strain, T. iii. 1769; Twist, //. twisted, 
HF. 775. _ 

Two so riche, twice as rich, L. 2291. 
Cf. Ten. 

Twyes, adv. twice, A 4348; Twye, A. i. 
16. 13. 

Tyd, sb. time, hour, T. ii. 1739 ; {usually) 
Tyde, R. 1452; season, F 142; Tydes, 
pi. tides, A 401. 

Tyden, v. befall, happen, B 337 ; pr. s. 
comes (to), (a Northern form) A 4175; 
Tit, pr. s. betides, T. i, 333; Tid, pp. 
happened, T. i. 907. 

Tydif, s. small bird, perhaps the titmouse, 
L. 154. See Tidifs. 

Tyme, s. time, A 35, 44 ; by tyme, early, 
betimes, L. 452; in good tytne, 3. 370; 
Tymes, //. hours, 5. 283 ; moments, R. 
380 ; {preceded by a number) Tyme, gen. 
pi. times, T. i. 441. 

Tyne, s. barrel, 12. 9. O. F. tine. 

Tyren, v. tear, rend, B 3. m 12. 49; pr. 
pi. pull to pieces, T. i. 787. 

Tytled, //. dedicated, I 894. 

U. 

Umbra extensa, or recta, the lower part of 

the ' skale ' ; Umbra versa, the upper 

part of the same, A. i. 12. 8. 
Umbreyde, //. s. upbraided, reproached, 

L. 1671. 
Unagreable, adj. miserable, B i. m i. 

32 ( Lat. ingratas) . 
Unbityde, v. fail to happen, B 5. p 4. 39. 
Unbodie, v. leave the body, T. v. 1550. 
Unbokele, v. unbuckle, F 555. 
Unbrent, pp. unburnt, B 1658. 
Unbroyden, //. unbraided, T. iv. 817. 



Unbuxumnesse, s. unsubmissiveness, 
24. 27. 

Uncircumscript, pp. boundless, T. v. 
1865. 

Unconning-, adj. unskilful, 6. 75. 

Unconning-e, s. ignorance, B 3066. 

Unconvenable, adj. unsuitable, I 431. 

Uncouple, v. to let loose, B 3692. 

Uncouth, adj. curious, A 2497 ; strange, 
HF. 1279 (where the text has uncouthe, 
but read uncouth). 

Uncouthly, adv. uncommonly, strik- 
ingly, R. 584. 

Uncovenable, adj. unseemly, I 631 ; 
unfit (for good), B 4. p 6. 333. 

Uncunninge, adj. ignorant, B i. p i. 68. 

Uncurteisly, adv. rudely, E 2363. 

Undefouled, undefiled, B 2. p 4. 24. 

Undepartable, adj. inseparable, B 4. p 
3. 62. 

UndergTOwe,//. of short stature, A 156. 

Undermeles, pi. undern-times, perhaps 
afternoons, D 875. See below. 

Undern, s. B 4412, E 260, 981. A par- 
ticular time in the morning is here 
implied, either about 9 a.m., or some- 
what later. (Also applied to signify 
mid-afternoon.) 

Undernona, pt. s. perceived, G 243 ; 
Undernome, //>. reproved, I 401. 

Underput, pp. subjected, B i. p 6. 97. 

Underpyghte, pt. s. stuffed, filled under- 
neath, B 789. 

Underspore, v. thrust (the staff) under, 
push beneath, A 3465. 

Understonde, v. understand, A 746; pr. 
pi. C 646; Understode,//. J. subj. should 
understand, T. i. 1035 ; Understonde, 
pp. understood, T. v. 1186. 

Undertake, v. affirm, E 803 ; ger. to con- 
duct an enterprise, A 405 ; warrant, R. 
461 ; dare say, B 3516. 

Undevocioun, s. lack of devotion, I 723. 

Undigne, adj. unworthy, E 359. 

Undo, ger. to unfold, reveal, 3. 899; v. 
unfasten, T. iii. 741 ; pr. s. opens, A 3727. 

Undoutous, adj. undoubting, B 5. p i. 

32. 
Uneschewably, adv. inevitably, B 5. p 

3- 135- 
Uneschuable, adj. inevitable, B 5. p i. 

105. 
Unethe, adv. scarcely ; welunethe, scarcely 

at all, HF. 2041. 
Unethes, adv. with difficulty, T. ii. 566. 
Unfamous, adj. lost to fame, HF. 1146. 
Unfestlich, adj. unfestive, jaded, F 366. 
Ungiltif, adj. guiltless, T. iii. 1018. 



(^lossarial Untic.r. 



119 



Un-gTobbed, adj. not digged round, 9. 14. 
Unbap, s. ill luck, T. i. 552. 
Unbappily, adv. unluckily, T. v. 937. 
Unbardy, adj. cowardly, A 4210. 
Unbele, s. misfortune, sickness, C 116. 
Unbolsom, adj. ailing, weak, T. iv. 330. 
Universe ; /« utiiverse, universally, T. iii. 

36. 
Universitee, s. the universal, B 5. p 4, 

187. 
Unkinde, adj. unnatural, B 88 ; cruel, 

5- 434- 
Unkindely, adv. unnaturally, C 485. 
Unkindenesse, s. unkindness, B 1057. 
Unkonning-, adj. unskilful, A 2393. 
Unkorven, adj. uncut, unpruned, 9, 14. 
Unkoutb, adj. strange, T. ii. 151. 
Unkunninge, adj. ignorant, R. 686. 
Unlaced, pp. disentangled, B 3. p 12. 166. 
Unleveful, adj. not permissible, 1 593, 777. 
Unloven, ^^r. to cease to love, T. v. 1698. 
Unlust, s. disinclination, I 680. 
Unlyklinesse, s. difficulty in pleasing, T. 

i. 16. 
Unlykly, adj. unpleasing, E 2180. 
Unmanbod, s. an unmanly act, T. i. 824. 
Unmerie, adj. sad, HF. 74, 
Unmigbty, adj. unable, T. ii. 858. 
Unneste, //;?;>. s. leave thy nest, T. iv, 305. 
Unnetbe, adv. scarcely, hardly, with 

difficulty, A 3121, B 1050, 1816, 3611. 
Unnetbes, adv. scarcely, B 1675, D 2168. 
Unordred, adj. not belonging to a re- 
ligious order, I 961. 
Unparig-al, adj. unequal (Lat. inpare7n), 

B3. p I. 13. 
Unpleyten, v. unplait, explain, unfold, 

B 2. p 8. II. 
Unpurveyed, adj. unprovided, uncared 

for, B 2. p I. 22. 
Unraced, adj. unbroken, untorn, B 4. 

P I- 53- 
Unremeved, pp. unremoved, without 

(its) being moved, A. ii. 46. 37. 
Unrests, s. restlessness, D 1104. 
Unrigbt, s. wrong, T. iv. 550; injury, 

T. ii. 453. 
Unrigbtful, adj. wicked, L. 1771. 
Unsad, adj. unsettled, E 995. 
Unsavory, adj. displeasing, I 510. 
Unscience, s. unreal knowledge, no 

knowledge, B 5. p 3. 113. 
Unsebnesse, s. unhappiness, B 4. p 4. 

38. 
Unsely, adj. unhappy, B 2. p 4. 8. 
Unset, adj. unappointed, A 1524. 
Unsbetbe, i pr. s. unsheathe, remove, 

T. iv. 776. 



Unsbette. pt. s. unlocked, E 2047. 
Unsbette. adj.pl. not shut, HF. 1953. 
Unsbevired, //. unconfessed, I 999. 
Unsitting-e, adj. unfit, T. ii. 307. 
Unskilful, adj. foolish, T. i. 790. 
Unskilfully, adv. unreasonably, B i. p 4. 

223. 
Unslekked, adj. unslacked, G 806. 
Unsofte, adj. harsh, E 1824. 
Unsolempne, adj. uncelebrated, B i. 

P 3- 64- 
Unspeedful, adj. unprofitable, B 5. p 6. 

337- 
Unstauncbable, adj. inexhaustible, B 2. 

p 7. 126 (Lat. inexhatista). 
Unstauncbed, adj. insatiate, B 2. p 6. 

115 (Lat. inexpletani). 
Unstraunge, adj. well-known, A. ii. 17. 

rubric. 
Unswelle, v. become less full, T. iv. 1146. 
Unswete, a^'. bitter, HF. 72. 
Untbank, s. no thanks, want of thanks, 

T. v. 699 ; a curse, A 4081. 
Untbrift, s. nonsense, T. iv. 431. 
Untbriftily, adv. poorly, G 893. 
Untbrifty, t?^'. profitless, T. iv. 1530. 
Untold, adj. uncounted, A 3780. 
Untressed, adj. with hair loose, 5. 268 ; 

unarranged, E379; unplaited, A 1289. 
Untretable, adj. inexorable, B 2. p 8. 2. 
Untre'we, adv. untruly, A 735. 
Untriste, v. distrust, T. iii. 839. 
Untyme; in nntyiiie, out of season, I 1051. 
Unwar, adj. unaware, T. i. 304; unex- 
pected, B 427. 
Unwar, adv. unexpectedly, unawares, T. 

i. 549- 

Unwelde, adj. (unwieldy), too weak to 
support herself, R. 359 ; difficult to move, 
H 55 ; difficult to control, A 3886. 

UnTvemmed, adj. unspotted, spotless, 
B 924, G 137, 225. 

Un"wened, adj. unexpected, B 4. p 6. 260. 

Unwist, adj. unknown, T. ii. 1294; un- 
■wist of, uninformed of, T. i. 93 ; unknown 
by, L. 1653. 

Unwit, s. folly, 4, 271. 

Unwot. pr. s. fails to know, B 5. p 6. 177. 

Unwrye, v. reveal, T. i. 858. 

Unyolden, //. without having yielded, 
A 2642. 

Up, adv. up; open (outwards, not up- 
wards), A 3801 ; as V. up with, HF. 1021 ; 
up and doun, T. ii. 659; in all directions, 
A 977 ; backwards and forwards, A 
1052. 

'\3'p,prep. on, upon, A 2543; up peril, or\ 
peril, D 2271 ; up peyne, under the 



I20 



@lo00arial Intiex. 



penalty, D 1587; up poynt, on the point, 

ready, T. iv, 1153. 
Up-bounde,//. bound up, T. iii. 517. 
Upcaste, pt. s. cast up, B 906. 
Up-drow, />/. s. drew up, L. 1459. 
Up-enbossed, //, raised, L. 1200. 
Up-haf, //. s. uplifted, A 2428. 
Upon, prep, upon, A 131 ; in, F 925 ; 

against, D 1313. 
Upon, used adverbially, upon (him or 

her), on, D 559, 1382. 
Uppe, adv. up, i. e. left open, F 615. 
Up-plight, pp. plucked up, pulled up, 

B 3239. 
Upright, adv. i. e. reversed, D 2266; also, 

lying on one's back (mostly of people 

asleep or dead) ; A 4194; B iSoi. 
Up-rist, pr. s. rises up, L. 1188 ; A 4249. 
Up-riste, s. dat. up-rising, A 1051. 
Upronne, pf>. ascended, F 386. 
Up-so-doun, adv. upside down, A 1377, 

G 625. 
Upspringe, v. rise (as the sun), 4. 14. 
Upsterte, pt. s. upstarted, arose, A 1080, 

1299. 
Up-yaf , pt. s. yielded up, gave, A 2427. 
Up-yolden,//. yielded up, A 3052. 
Usdgre, s. usage, habit, A no; kadde in 

nsd^o-e, was accustomed, B 1696; 7vas in 

usage, B 17 17. 
Usaunce, s. custom, R. 683. 
Usaunt, /r^j. //. as adj. addicted, I 821 ; 

accustomed, A 3940. 
Usen, ger. to accustom, I 245 ; v. use, B 44 ; 

Useth, pr. s. is accustomed, L. 364. 
Us-selve, pron. ourselves, I 349. 
Usshers, s.pl. ushers, F 293. 
Usure, s. usury, B 1681. 
Us-ward, to, towards us, B 2938, 
Utter, adj. outward, G 498. 
Uttereste, adj. super I. supreme, E 787. 



Vache, s. cow, beast, 13. 22. The reference 
is to a quadruped that looks down to the 
earth. 

Valance, s. {possibly) sign of zodiac op- 
posite the mansion of a planet, 4. 145 ; 
if so, the reference here is to the sign 
of Aries. 

Val6ur, s, worth, R. 957. 

Vane, s. a weather-cock, E 996. 

Vanish, i pr. s. shrink up, waste away, 
C732. 

Variaunce, s. variation, T. iv. 985 ; Vari- 
ance, difference, I 427. 

Variaunt, adj. varying, G 1175. 



Vassalag-e, s. prowess, L. 1667. 

Vavassour, s. a sub-vassal, next in dig- 
nity to a baron, A 360. 

Veine, adj. fem. vain, R. 447. 

Veluet, s. velvet, R. 1420; Veluettes.//. 
F 644. 

Venerian, adj. devoted to Venus, D 609. 

Venerye, s. hunting, A 166, 2308. 

Venge, v. revenge, B 2471. 

Veng-eresses, s.pl. avengeresses, aveng- 
ing deities, B 3. m 12. 38. 

Venim, s. venom, poison, R. 1089 ; malice, 
B 891, C 421; corruption, A 2751; dye 
(Lat. ueneno), B 2. m 5. 12. 

Ventusinge, s. cupping (a surgical opera- 
tion), A 2747. 

Venus, venereal pleasure, D 464. 

Ver, the spring, T. i. 157. 

Veray, adj. very, true, real, L. 1068. 

Verdegrees, s. verdigrease, G 791. 

Verdit, s. verdict, A 787. 

Verndge, s. a wine of Italy, B 1261. 

Vernicle, s. vernicle, A 685. A copy of 
the sacred handkerchief on which the 
impression of the Saviour's face was 
distinguishable. 

Vernisshed, pt. s. varnished ; hence 
(jocularly), lined in a lavish way, A 
4149. 

Verre, s. glass, T. ii. 867. 

Verray , adj. very, true, A 72, 422 ; v. force, 
main force, B 3237. 

Verrayly, adv. verily, truly, 2. 73. 

Verrayment, adv. verily, B 1903. 

Versiflour, s. poet, B 2783. 

Vertu, s. virtue, A 307 ; quickening power, 
A 4; power, A 2249; valour, R. 1208; 
mental faculty, HF. 550; magic in- 
fluence, F 146, 157; V. plese, satisfy 
virtue, be virtuous, E 216. 

Vertuous, adj. virtuous, A 251 ; full of 
virtue, D 1113; full of healing power, 
R. 1097 ; holy, I 455. 

Verye (a word used in a charm), A 3485. 
Perhaps for weri, an accursed creature ; 
A. S. wearg. 

Vese, s. rush (Lat. impetus), A 1985. 

Vessel, s. (collectively), vessels, plate, B 

3338- 
Vestiment, s. clothing, F 59. 
Veyne, s. vein, A 3. 
Veyne-blood, s. bleeding at a vein, A 

2747. 
Vidge, s. voyage, travel, journey, T. ii. 75 ; 

expedition, attempt, T, iii. 732. 
Vicaire, s. deputy, deputed ruler, 5. 379; 

Vicary, a vicar, I 22. * 

Victor, s. as adj. of victory, 5. 182. 



(glossarial Eutiex. 



121 



Vig-ile, s. wake, T. v. 305. 

Vig-ilyes, />/. vigils, A 377. 

Viker, s. vicar, D 2008. 

Vileinous, adj. evil, B 2693. 

Vileins, Vileyns, afl^'. villainous, L. 1824 ; 
rude, D 1268; sinful, I 854, 914; evil, 
wicked, I 556. 

Vileinsly, adv. evilly, I 154 ; Vilaynsly, 
shamefully, R. 1498. 

Vileinye, s. vile conduct, B 2547; great 
harm, A 4191 ; despiteful language, re- 
proach, D 34, 53 ; disgrace, A 942 ; unfit 
speech, A 70; servitude, I 143; dis- 
courtesy, rudeness, C 740; vileness, HF. 
96; reproach, Tt iv. 21; evil-doing, B 
1681. 

Vinolent, adj. full of wine, D 467, 1931. 

Violes, s.p/. vials, phials, G 793. 

Virelayes, s.p/. ballads with a particular 
return of rime, F 948 ; L. 423. 

Viritoot, s. brisk movement, A 3770. 

Viritrate, s. hag, D 1582. 

Visage, V. put a face (on it), disguise, E 
2273. 

Visitaciouns, s.p/. visits, D 555. 

Visyte, ^^r. to visit, A 493, 1194. 

Vitaille, s. victuals, provisions, A 248, 569. 

Vitaille, v. provide with victuals, L. 1093. 

Vitamers, p/. victuallers, A 4366. 

Vitremyte, .f. {probab/y) a woman's cap, 
an effeminate head-dress, B 3562. 

Voided, pp. removed, F 1195; cleared, 
emptied, L. 2625. 

Vois, s. voice, R. 751. See Voys. 

Volage, adj. giddy, volatile, R. 1284; 
wanton, H 239. 

Volatyl, s. as p/. fowls, B 1262. 

Voltor, j-. vulture, B 3. m 12. 46; p/. T. i. 
788. 

Volupeer, s. night-cap, A 4303 ; Voluper, 
woman's cap, A 3241. 

Vouche, v.; on/y used with sauf, safe; 
Vouche sauf, v. to avouch as safe, call 
safe, vouchsafe, grant, deign, permit, 
A 812, B 1641, E 2341 ; I pr. s. am content, 
T. iv. 90; 2 pr. p/. vouchsafe, grant, 
deign, L. 2038; Voucheth sauf, imp.p/. 
vouchsafe, E 885, F 1043. 

Voyde (voidee),j, 'voidee,' alight dessert, 
with wine and spices, T. iii. 674. 

Voyden, v. get rid of, expel, A 2751, E 
910, F 188; imp. s. depart from, E 806; 
Voydeth, imp.p/. send away, G 1136. 

Voys, s. voice, A 688, C 531 ; rumour, 
E 629; commendation, E 1592; report, 
T. iii. 1723. 

Vulgar, adj. A. ii. 9. 5. The day vu/gar 
is the length of the ' artificial ' day, 



with the durations of morning and 
evening twilight added to it. 
Vyce, s. fault, error, T. i. 689; F loi ; 
defect, D 955. 

W. 

Waast, s. waist, B 1890. 

"Waat, pr. s. knows (Northern), A 4086. 

Wacche, s. sentinel, B 2216. 

Wachet, s. light blue colour, A 3321. 

Later E. watchet. 
Waden, v. pass, E 1684 ; wade (through), 

D 2084; enter (into), T. ii. 150; go, 

descend, B 3684. 
Waf . pt. s. wove, L. 2364. 
Wafereres, s. p/. makers of gaufres or 

wafer-cakes, confectioners, C 479. 
Wages, //. A 1803 ; pay, recompense, 

4. 244. 
Wag-g-ing, s. shaking, T. ii. 1745. 
Waiten, v. attend on, L. 1269 ; pr. s. 

watches, E 708 ; imp. s. observe, A. ii. 

5.18. 
Wake, V. be awake, lie awake, 18. 27; 

Waken, v. act. awake, B 1187; pr. s. 

watches, F 819; Wook, \ pt. s. awoke, 5. 

695; remained awake, B 3809; Waked, 

pp. awaked, 3. 294 ; kept wake, caroused, 

3- 977- 
Wake-pleyes, p/. funeral games, A 2960. 
Waker, adj. vigilant, 5. 358. 
Waking, s. watching, being awake, 3. 

611; period of wakefulness, B 22;//. 

vigils, I 257. 
Wdlet, a wallet, A 686; Walet, A 681. 
Walked {for Walketh), s. walking; in 

plir. go walked, for go a-\valketh, gone 

a-walking, 3. 387 ; D 1778. 
Walken, ger. to walk, roam, A 2309; 

Welk, I pt. s. walked, T. ii. 517; is 

wa/ked, is gone, went, A 2368. 
Walsh-note, gen. sitig. walnut's, HF. 

1281. 
Walwe, ger. to wallow, roll about, T. i. 

699 ; pr. p/. wallow, tumble, A 4278 ; 

pr. s. tosses, L. 1166 ; rolls about, D 1085 ; 

pp. involved, immersed, 12. 17 ; Wal- 

winge, pres. part, causing to roll, B i. 

m 7. 4 (Lat. no/uens). 
Wanges, s. p/. molar teeth, A 4030. 
Wang-tooth, s. molar tooth, B 3234. 
Wanhope, s. despair, A 1249. 
Wanie. v. wane, A 2078. 
Wante, v. be wanting, be absent, L. 361 ; 

fail, be lacking, I 514; pr. s. is lacking, 

n 338. 
Wantownesse, s. wantonness, B 31; 
mannerism (of speech), A 264. 



E4 



\ 



122 



(glossarial hxiizx. 



Wantrust, s. distrust, T. i. 794 ; H 280. 
War, adj. prudent, discreet, cautious, T, 

i. 203 ; aware, A 157, 896, 3604 ; was I w., 

I observed, 5. 218, 298 ; / was w., 3. 445 ; 

den tv., beware, T. i, 635 ; de w., beware, 

13. 11; take warning, G 737; de w.fro, 

beware of, L. 473 ; beth w., beware, T. iii. 

1180; B 1629, 3281. 
War him, let him beware, A 662; war 

yotv, make way, B 1889. 
Warde, s. dat. (?) keeping; on w., into 

his keeping, 3. 248 ; in our w., C 201 ; 

under my w., I 880. 
Wardecors, s. body-guard. D 359. 
Warderere, for warde rere, look out 

behind, A 4101. 
Wardrobe, s. privy, B 1762. 
Ware, adj. aware, 3. 1030. 
Ware, s. wares (for sale), merchandise, B 

140, 1246. 
Ware, imp. pi. beware, B 4416. 
Warente,_^<?/-. to warrant, protect, C 338. 
Wariang-les, //. shrikes, butcher-birds, 

D 1408. 
Warien, ger, to curse, T. ii. 1619 ; i pr. s. 

B 372. 
Warisoun, s. requital, R. 1537. 
Warisshe, v. cure, I 998; recover, be 

cured, B 2172; pp. cured, B 2467. 
Warisshing-e, s. cure, B 2205. 
Warly, adv. warily, carefully, T. iii. 454. 
Warne, v. reject, refuse, i. 11; i pr. s. 

warn, bid you take heed, B 16, 1184; 

invite, B 2652; 2 pr. s. snbj. inform, HF. 

893 ; pp. forewarned, L. 2658 ; given 

notice, B 1578. 
Warnestore, ger. to fortify, defend, B 

2487; to garrison, B 2521; pp. pro- 
visioned, B I. p 3. 85. 
Warnestoring-, s. fortifying, B 2525. 
Waryce, v. heal, cure, C 906. 
Waste, adj.pl. wasted, partially destroyed, 

A 1331. 
Wastel-breed, s. cake-bread, bread of the 

very best quality, A 147. 
Wastour, s. waster, E 1535. 
Watering", s. watering-place (for horses), 

A 826. 
Wawe. s. wave, B 508, I 363. 
Waxen,//", become, T. V. 1014, 1374, 1376. 
Wayk, adj. weak, L. 2428, 2713. 
Wayken, ger. to grow weak, lessen, 

T. iv. 1 144. 
Waymenten, ^^r. to lament, I 230. 
Waymenting-e, s. lamenting, lamenta- 
tion, A 995, 1921. 
Wayn. s. car, B 4. m i. 34. 
Wayten, ger. to observe, T, i. 190; to 



watch for, F 1263; to watch, F 444; 
V. to expect, B 467 ; pr. s. seeks occasion, 
A 1222. 

Webbe, s. a weaver, A 362. 

Wedde, s. dat.; to w., as a pledge, in 
pledge, A 1218, B 1613. 

Wedde, ^tv. to wed, T. v. 863. 

Wedding", s. wedlock, 17. 24. 

Wede, s. weed, robe, garment, A 1006, 
B 2107, E 863. 

Weder, s. weather, D 2253, Y 52; storm, 
T. ii. 2, iii. 657. 

Wedes,//. weeds, T. i. 946. 

Weel, adv. well, A 926; well placed, 
luckily situated, B 306. 

Weelding-e, s. power, control, B 2800. 

Weep. pt. s. of Wepe. 

Weeply, adj. tearful, sorrowful, B i.p i. 3. 

Weet, s. wet, A 4107. 

Weex,//. s. waxed, grew, G 513. 

Weg-ge, s. a wedge, A. i. 14. 6. 

Wehee, s. a whinnying noise, A 4066. 

Weilawey, alas ! D 216. 

Wei, adv. well, A 384, B 25; much, L. 
1386; many, L. 11; certainly, L. 452; 
fully, A 29, 49; about {used with num- 
bers), A 24; wel royal, very royal, F 26; 
wel ?iy, very nearly, B 3230 ; wel the bet, 
much better, T. ii. 92 ; ivel unethe, 
scarcely at all, L. 33 a; to be wel, to 
be in favour, 3. 845 ; wel is hitn, it is 
well for him, T. i. 350; well was him, 
it was well for him, B 4066 ; y^i?/ ivel, 
verv well, A 122. 

Welawey, int. alas! T. iii, 1695. 

Welde, s. weld, Reseda Luteola, 9, 17. 

Welde, s. power, control, R. 395. 

Welden, ger. to have control over, to 
move with ease, D 1947 ; to control, 
D 271; to wield, L. 2000; Welte, /A s. 
B 3200. 

Weldy, adj. wieldy, active, T. ii. 636. 

Wele, s. happiness, success, prosperity,, 
well-being, good fortune, A 895, 3101, 
B 122. 

Weleful. adj. prosperous, happy, B 2507 ; 
blessed, B 451. 

Welefulnesse. s. happiness, B i. p 3. 35. 

"Welk.//. s. of Walken. 

Welked, pp. as adj. withered, C 738, 
D 277. 

Wellcen, s. heaven, sky, HF. 1601 ; 
Welkne, 10. 62. 

Welmeth,/r. s. wells, gushes, R. 1561. 

Welte,//. -f. wielded, i.e. lorded it over, 
possessed for use, B 3200. 

Wel-willy, adj. benevolent, benign, bene- 
ficent, Y. iii. 1257. 



#lo0sarial HuIilt. 



12 



Wem, s. blemish, R. 930; hurt, F 121, 
■Wemmelees, ady. stainless, G 47. 
Wenden, ^er. to go, A 21, 2214; pass 

away, A 3025 ; go, pass, B 1683 ; Went, 

pr. s. goes, T. ii. 36, 812; Wente, />/. s. 

went, A 78, B 1739; Wente him, />/. s. 

went, G no; W'entestow, 2 /r. J. hast 

thou gone, A 3486; Went, />/>. gone, L. 

165 1 ; ^1?;/ 71'^;//', are gone, B 173 ; is went, 

is gone, G 534. 
Wending", s. departure, T. iv. 1344, 1436. 
Wene, s. supposition, doubt, T. iv. 1593 ; 

wtthouteii wene, without doubt, R. 574, 

732- 

Wenen, v. ween,- suppose, imagine, con- 
sider, L. 12; G 676; expect, A 4320; 
Wenestow, weenest thou, thinkest thou, 
D 311; Weneth, /;-. s. imagines (with 
mett = QX\&), A 2195; Wende, i pt. s, 
imagined, T. v. 693 ; supposed, F 585 ; 
fancied, A 1269; Wendest, 2 //-. s. subj. 
shouldst ween, T. i. 1031 ; Wende, pt. s. 
subj. would have thought, C 782 ; Wend, 
pp. supposed, T. iv. -384; imagined, T. v. 
1682. 

Weng-ed, adj. winged, HF. 21 18. 

Weng-es, //. wings, L. 168 a. 

Wening-e, s. imagination, supposition, 
T. iv. 992. 

Went, pr. s. and pp. of Wenden. 

Wente, pt. s. of Wenden. 

Wente, s. turn, T. ii. 63; path, passage, 
T. iii. 787 ; footpath, 18. 69. 

Wepe, V. weep, A 144, 230; Weep, pt. s. 
wept, A 148, B 606, 1052; Wepte, pt. s. 
{weak form), B 267; \Vepen, //>. T. i. 
941 ; Wopen,//. F 523. 

Wepen, s. weapon, L. 1994. 

Werbul, s. tune (warble), T. ii. 1033. 

Werche, v. work, perform, B 566 
Wroghtestow {for Wroghtest thou) 
thou didst cause, B 3583 ; Wroghte, //, s. 
worked, A 497 ; contrived, B 1788 
made, E 1152; Wroughte, i pt. s. acted 
A. ii. 3. 46 ; did, R. 701 ; Wrought, pp 
made, formed, R. 559; born, B 3619 
created, G 326; composed, L. 372. 

Werde, pt. s. of Were (wear). 

Werdes, .r. pi. fates, destinies, B i. m i. 
14. 

Were, s. weir, 5. 138 ; T. iii. 35. 

Were, J. doubt, 3. 1295; HF. 979; men- 
tal struggle, L. 2686. Lowl. Sc. weir. 

Were, o. pt. s. wast, T. iv. 762; it were, 
they were, E 850; al were it, though it 
were, D 1172. 

Were (w^rs), v. wear, 21, 7; Werede, 
//. s. wore, A 1388, 3235 ; Werde, R. 875 ; 



Wered, A 75 ; Wered upon, i pt. s. wore 

upon (me), D 559. 
Were, ger. to defend, A 2550. 
Weringe, s. wearing, I 1052. 
Werk, s. work, A 479; act, L. 891. 
Werken, v. act, A 3527 ; pr. s. acts, L. 

1385- 
Werkers,//. doers, D 1937. 
Werkes, pr.pl. ache, A 4030. 
Werking-, s. deed, H 210; mode of 

operation, G 1367. 
Werne, ger. to refuse, T. iii. 149, iv. in ; 

V. i-efuse, R. 1485 ; warn off, R. 636 ; 

Werned,//. forbidden, R. 442. 
Werning", s. let, forbidding, R. 1142. 
Werre, s. war, T. ii. 868; trouble, T. v. 

1393; of werre, in war, T. i. 134; to w., 

in enmity, i. 116. 
Werre, adv. worse, 3. 616. 
Werreye, ger. to make war, A 1484; v. 

war against, A 1544 ; pr. s. opposes, I 

487. 
Werreyour, s. warrior, L. 597. 
Wers, adj. worse, A 3872. 
Werste, adj. super I. worst, T. ii. 304. 
Werte, s. wart, A 555. 
Wery, adj. (being) weary, T. iv. 707 ; 

worn, R. 440, 664; beaten repeatedly, 

lit. weary, B 4. m 5. 17. 
Wesele. s. weasel, A 3234. 
Wesh.//. s. of Wasshe. 
Weste, V. turn to the west, L. 61, 197. 
Westren, v, to go to the west, T. ii. 906. 
Wete, s. perspiration, G 1187. 
Wete, V. wet, HF. 1785. 
Wether, s. sheep, T. iv. 1374. 
Weven. v. weave, L. 2352; V^lai, pt. s. 

wove, L. 2364. 
Wex, s. wax, A 675, E 1430. 
Wexen, v. wax, grow, become, B 2265, G 

877 ; I pr. s. subj, may 1 become, G 1377 ; 

Wexe, 2 pr. pi. increase, grow^ (in ap- 
plauding), E 998; Wex, pt. s. grew, 

became, A 1362; increased, L. 727; 

Woxe,//. grown, R. 1460; become, HF. 

1494. 
Wexede, pt. s. coated with wax, A. ii. 

40. 28. 
Wey, s. way, A 34; path, R. 1345; the 

sun's apparent daily path, A. ii. 30. 5; 

the sun's apparent annual orbit, A. i. 

21. 49; a furlong loey, a short time (lit. 

short distance), E 516; go .wey, go thy 

way, T. i. 574; do ivey, take away, A 

3287. 
Weyen, v. weigh, B 3776; oghte wey en, 

ought to weigh, L. 398. 
Weyere, s. the ' weigher,' a translation 



124 



@l000arial lEntiex. 



of the Lat. equator; because the days 
and nights, at the equinoxes, are equal ; 
A. i. 17. 25. 

Weyk, adj. weak, 7. 341. 

Weylaway, interj. alas ! A 938. 

Weyraentinge, s. lamenting, A 902; 
JHiiient, T. ii. 65. 

Weynes, s.pl. chariots, B 4. m 5. 6. 

Wey ven, ger. to turn aside, E 1483 ; v. 
waive, neglect, T. ii. 284; put aside, D 
1 176; forsake, G 276; abandon, B 2406. 

Whan, when, A 5, 18, 179. 

What, whatever, 4. 170 ; what sort of a, 
L. 1305; what with, B 21, 22; why, T. 
ii. 262, 292 ; what ! how ! L. 1800 ; What 
that, whatever, E 165 ; What man that, 
whoever, B 2645 ; What . . what, partly, 
. . partly, HF. 2058. 

Wheelen, ger. to cause to revolve, T. i. 

139- 
Whelkes, pi. pimples, blotches, A 632. 
Whelp, s. cub, A 2627. 
Whenne, adv. whence, E 588. 
Whennes, adv. whence, B 2400. 
Wher, adv. where, B 1785, &c. ; wherever, 

R. 1669 ; Wher as {or Wher-as) , where 

that, where, B 647, 1311. 
Wher, whether, {a common contracted 

form of whether), 3, 91^ 
Wher-as, adv. where that, where, T. iii. 

516. 
Whereof, prep, in what respect, R. 703 ; 

for what, R. 1552. 
Wherfore, for any cause, C 216. 
Wher-on ; long wher-on, because of what, 

G930. 
Wher-so, whether, B 294; wherever, L. 

439- 

Wher-throug-h, adv. by means of which, 
3. 120. 

Wherto, adv. for wherefore, T. i. 409. 

Whete, s. wheat, C 375. 

Whether, adj. which (of two), A 1856. 

Whette, //,//. sharpened, T. v. 1760, 

Which, pron. which, A 161 ; whom, A 
568; what kind of, L, 1883; Which a, 
what kind of a, what a, L. 668, 869, &c. 

Whider, whither, T. v. 428, 486. 

Whilk, which (Northern), A 4078. 

Whilom, adv. once, D 2017. 

Whippeltree {better Wippeltree), cornel- 
tree, A 2923. 

Whirle, ger. to rush, go swiftly, T. v, 
1019; V. be whirled round, 5. 80.' 

Who, interrog. who, T. v. 371 ; D 692; 
indef. who (it might be), 3. 244; one 
who, 3.559; whoever, who, T. v, 1115 ; 
Who was who, which was which, A 4300. 



Whyle, s. time, A 3299; worth the wh., 

worth while, T. v. 882. 
Whyl-er, adv. formerly, G 1328. 
Whyles, gen. s. as adv. ; thewhyles, whilst, 

3- 151- 
Whylom, adv. once, formerly, once on a 

time, R. 10. 362. 
Whyne, v. whine, whinny, D 386. 
Whyt, adj. white, A 238; as sb., white 

wine, C 526, 562; pi. innocent, guileless, 

T. iii. 1567 ; specious, flattering, T. iii. 

901. 
Whyte, s. white (i. e. silver), T. iii. 1384. 
Widwe, s. widow, A 253. 
Widwehode, s. widowhood, I 916; 

Widwehed, L. 295 a. 
Wierdes, pi. fates, T. iii. 617 ; Wirdes, 

L. 2580. A. S. wyrd. 
Wight, s. a person, creature, man, living 

being, A 71, 280 ; whit, short while, A 

4283 ; Wightes, pi. creatures, men, beings, 

A 3479- 

Wig-ht, adj. active, B 3457 ; fleet, A 4086. 

Wighte, s. weight, HF. 739 ; A 2145, 2520. 

Wike, s. week, C 362. See Wyke. 

Wiket, s. wicket-gate, small gate, E 2045, 
2118. 

Wikke, adj. evil, wicked, bad, A 1087, 
1580 ; false, B 2247 ; depraved, 10. 55 ; 
much alloyed, HF. 1346. 

Wikked, adj. bad, wicked, L. 2395 ; pi. 
wicked, I 112. In B 3576, wikked nest is 
put for F. tnau ni, i. e. Sir Oliver Mauny ; 
see the note in the larger edition. 

Wikkednesse, s. evil, 17. 7. 

Wil, s. will, 6. 83. See Wille. 

Wil, I pr. s. desire, wish, 7. 244 ; pr. s. 
desires, B 1843. 

Wilde, adj. wild; Wilde fyr, wild fire, 
fire not easily put out, Greek fire, D 
373 ; flaming spirits, I 445 ; a disease, 
erysipelas, A 4172, E 2252 ; Wilde, pi. A 
2018. 

Wildnesse, s. wilderness, 9. 34. 

Wilen,/r.//. will, R. 1683. 

Wilful, adj. voluntary, B 3. p ii. 167. 

Wilful, as adv. wilfully, willingly, 5. 429. 

Wilfulhed, .f. wilfulness, L. 355 a. 

Wilfully, adv. willingly, voluntarily, of 
free will, by choice, B 4486, C 441. 

Wilfulnesse, s. wish, B 2572. 

Wille, s. own accord, will, i. 45, 57 ; plea- 
sure, desire, E 326, F i, 8 ; Willes, gen. 
F 568 ; as by his w., willingly, 17. 12, 

Wille, V. will, desire, E 721. 

Willing, s. desire, E 319. 

Willingly, adv. of free will, E 362. 

Wilnen, v. desire, A 2114; Wilnest, 2 pr. 



(glossarial Jinticx. 



12 



s. desirest, A 1609; Wilned, i />t. s. 3. 
1262, 1267. A. S. wibiia77. 

Wilninge, s. willing, wishing, B 3. p 11. 
88 ; pi. desires, B. 3. p 11. 175. 

Wilow, s. willow-tree, A 2922, 

WiltO"W, 2 pr. s. wilt thou, A 1 156 ; wisliest 
thou, B 2116; wilt thou (go), D 1387. 

Wimpel, ^. wimple, a covering tor the 
head, gathered round it, and pleated 
under the chin, A 151. 

Wimpleth, pr. s. conceals (as with a 
wimple), B 2. p I. 66. 

Windas, s. windlass, F 184. 

Wiude, ger. to turn, T. iii. 1541 ; to re- 
volve, T. ii. 601 ; to roam about, L. 818 ; 
Winde, v. wind, entwine, T. iii. 1232; 
intertwine, 5. 671 ; ply, bend, T. i. 257 ; 
bind with cloths, E 583 ; twist and turn, 
G 980 ; Winde, 2 pr. s. subj. mayst go, 
T. iii, 1440; Wond, //. s. wound, went 
about, L. 2253. 

Winding-e. s. twisting, I 417. 

Wind-melle, s. wind-mill, HF. 1280. 

Windre, ger. to trim, R. 1020; pp. 
trimmed, R. 1018. Cf. O. Y. guignier. 

Windy, adj. unstable as wind, B 2. p 8. 
28. 

"Winged, provided with wings, A 1385. 

"Winke, v. wink, B 4496; nod, F 348; 
remain awake, T. iii. 1537 ; Winke, i pr. 
s. am asleep, 5. 7. 

Winne,^^r. to win, gain, A 427; to con- 
quer, F 214; to get gain, C 461 ; iv.fro, 
to get away from, T. v. 1125; Wan, i 
pt. s. got, D 1477 ; won, gained, A 442, 
989 ; pt. s. used as pt. pi. F 1401 ; Won- 
nen, pp. won, A 877, 3381. 

Winning-, s. gain, profit, A 275, D 416. 

Winsing-e, pres. pt. wincing, starting 
aside, i. e. skittish, A 3263, 

Winter, pi. years, T. i. 811. 

Wirche, v. work, A 3430 ; provide, E 1661 ; 
give relief, A 2759 ; in passive sense, to 
be made, HF. 474; ger. to perform, A 
3308 ; Wirk, i7np. s. do, E 1485. 

Wirdes, pi. Fates, L. 2580 ; Wierdes, T. 
iii. 617. 

Wirk, itnp. s. work, do, E 1485. 

Wirkinge, s. efificiency, B 3. p 11. 26; 
actions, D 698 ; calculation, F 1280. 

Wis, adv. certainly, verily, surely, T. ii. 
381, 474, 563 ; A 2786, D 621 ; as wis, as 
sure (as), T. iv. 1655; assuredly, F 1470.' 
See Ywis. 

Wisly, adv. certainly, truly, verily, A 
1863, 3994, 4162. 

Wisse, V. instruct, T. i. 622; inform, D 
1415 ; show, tell, D 1008 ; 2 pr. s. subj. 



teach, 5. 74 ; imp. s. direct, guide, i. 155. 
A. S. wissian. 

Wissh, I //. s. washed, R. 96, 125. 

Wisshe, v. wish, T. ii. 406. 

Wist, -e ; see Witen. 

Wit, J-, reason, R. 1535 ; understanding, B 
2702; judgement, A 279; mind, R. 1694; 
knowledge, mental power, R. 401 ; wis- 
dom, T. iv. 1508 ; proof of intelligence, 
E 459 ; Wittes, //. senses, B 202 ; wits, 
F 706; opinions, F 203. 

Witen, ger. to know, to wit, T. v. 1324 ; 
Wite, ^^r. to know, 3. 493; to discover, 
D 1450; do you 7vite, make you know, 
inform you, T. ii. 1635; Woot, i pr. s. 
wot, know, A 389 ; pr. s. knows, 2. 30 ; 
W^ot, I pr. s. L. 4 ; pr. s. knows, B 195 ; 
Woost, 2.pr.s. knowest, T. i. 633; Wost, 
•zpr. s. L. 542; Wostow, thou knowest, 
A 2304; Witen, i pr. pi. wit, know, A 
1260; Witen, 2/r. jzJ/. D 1890; know ye, 
H 1,82; Woot {wrojjgly used for ^N'\\.e) , 
2 pr. pi. know, A 740; Wiste, i //. s. 
wist, knew, E 814; Wistest, 2 //. s. 
knewest, A 1156; Wistestow, knewest 
thou, T. iii. 1644; Wiste, pt. s. knew, 
R. 1344 ; Wist, pp. known, B 1072 ; 
Witeth, imp. //.know, T. i. 687. A. S. 
wita7i ; pr. t. wdt, wUst, wat, pi. witon ; 
pt. t. wiste. 

With, with, A 5, 10, &c. ; to hele with your 
hurtcs, to heal your wounds with, F 471. 

With-drow, \pt. s. subtracted, A. ii. 45. 
12. 

Withllolden,^^r. to retain, I 1041 ; With- 
holde, //. retained, B 2202; detained, 
G 345 ; shut up, kept in confinement, 
A 511. 

Withinne-forth, adv. within, B 5. p 5. 
14. 

With-oute-forth. adv. outwardly, I 172. 

Withouten, prep, besides, as well as, A 
461 ; excepting, T. ii. 236. 

Withseye, v. contradict, gainsay, A 805 ; 
refuse, L. 367; renounce, G 457. 

Withstonde, v. withstand, oppose, B 
3110; Withstonde, pp. withstood, T. i. 

253- 

Witing-, s. knowledge, cognizance, A 
1611. 

Witing-ly, adv. knowingly, I 401. 

Witnesfully, adv. publicly, B 4. p 5. 11. 

Witterly, adv. plainly, truly, L. 2606. 

Wivere, s. wyvern, snake, T. iii. loio. 
O. F. wivre, lit. viper. 

Wlatsom, adj. disgusting, B 3814; hein- 
ous, B 4243. 

Wo, s. woe, R. 319 ; ?ne is 7vo, I am sorry, 



126 



(ilossarial EntiEx. 



L. 1985 ; wo tvi-re us, woe would be to 
us, E 139. 

Wo, adj. unhappy, R. 312; sad, grieved, 
A 351. 

Wode, adj. ; see Wood. 

Wode-binde, s. woodbine, honeysuckle, 
A 1508. 

Wodedowve, s. wood-pigeon, B i960. 

Wodewale, s. the green woodpecker, 
Gcchius viridls, R. 914. 

Wodnesse, s. madness, T. iii. 794. 

Wol, I pr. s. (I) will, A 42; desire, E 646; 
Wole, 1 pr. s. am ready to, T. i. 589; 
Wolt, 2 pr. s. wilt, E 314; Woltow, wilt 
thou, A 1544; dost thou wish, D 840; 
Wol, pr. s. will, B 60; wills, desires, 
HF. 662; wishes for, T, ii. 396; wishes 
(to go), will go, L. 1 191 ; permits, H 28; 
Wole, will go, D 353 ; wol adoun, is about 
to set, I 72 ; Wol ye so, if you so wish it, 
E 2264; Wil ye, wish ye, F 378; Woln, 
pr.pl. will, wish (to have), A 2121 ; Wol- 
len, pr. pi. will, B 2561 ; Wolde, xpt. s. 
desired, 6. 48 ; should like, B 1637 ; 
Woldestow, if thou wouldst, L. 760; 
wouldst thou, B 4536; Wolde, pt. s. 
would, A 144; would like to, B 1182; 
wished, L. 952 ; required, F 577 ; would 
go, would turn, F 496 ; wished to, 4. 
124; T. ii. 514; Wolde . . . unto, would 
go to, B 3786 ; god 7oolde, oh ! that God 
would grant, 3. 665 ; wolde god, oh ! that 
God would be pleased, D 1103; Wolde 
whoso nolde, i. e. whoever would or 
would not, T. i. 77 ; Wold, pp. desired, 
18. II ; willed, B 2190, 2615. 

Wolde, s.dat. possession, R. 451. 

Wolle, s. wool, L. 1791. 

Woln, Woltow ; see Wol. 

Wombe, s. belly, A 4290 ; womb, E 2414 ; 
the depression in the front of an astro- 
labe, A. i. 3. 3. 

Wombe-side, the front of the astro- 
labe, A. i. 6. 10. 

Wommanhede, s. womanhood, B 851. 

Wond ; pt. s. of Winde. 

Wonde, v. desist, L. 1187. 

Wonder, adj. wonderful, wondrous, 
strange, T. i. 419. 

Wonder, adv. wondrously, R. 242. 

Wonderly, adv. wondrously, A 84. 

Wonder-most, adj. sup. most wonderful, 
HF. 2059. 

Wonders, adv. wondrously, R. 27. 

Wone (wuna), s. custom, usage, wont, 
T. ii. 318; HF. 76. 

Wone, v. dwell, inhabit, G 332 ; Woneth, 
pr. s. dwells, lives, D 1573 ; Woneden, 



pt.pl. dwelt, A 2927; Woned, pp. dwelt, 

T. i. 276; wont, accustomed, T. ii. 400, 

v. 277. 
Wones (woonez), pi. places of retreat, 

hence, range of buildings, D 2105. See 

Woon. 
Wong-er, s. pillow, B 2102. 
Woning-, s. habitation, house, A 606. 
Wonne, -n; see Winne, 
Wood (wood), .f. woad, 9. 17. 
Wood (wood), adj. mad, A 184, 582, 636; 

mad with anger, D 313 ; for 7vood, as 

bemg mad, madly, furiously, L. 2420; 

for pure wood, for very rage, R. 276 ; 

teti so wood, ten times as fierce, L. 736 ; 

Wode, def. adj. mad, T. ii. 1355. 
Woodeth, pr. s. rages, G 467. 
Woodly, adv. madly, A 1301. 
Woodnesse, s. madness, rage, A 2011, 

3452. 
Woon (woon), s. resource, T. iv. 1181 ; 

plenty, abundance, L. 1652; number, 

L. 2161 ; retreat, secure place, HF. 1166 ; 

of sorwe w^(?«, abundance of sorrow, 3. 

475 ; Wones, pi. places of retreat, range 

of buildings, D 2105. 
Woost, Woot; see Wite. 
Wopen, pp. of Wepe. 
W^orcher, s. worker, maker, 4. 261. 
Worcheth, /r. s. works, 3. 815. 
Word, s. word, A 304; good word, ap- 
proval, T. V. 1081 ; w. by w., word by 

word, D 2244 ; at shorte wordes, briefly, 

in a word, L. 2462; hadde the ivordes, 

was spokesman, I 67. 
Word and ende {for Ord and ende), 

beginning and end, T, ii. 1495, iii. 702, 

V. 1669; B 391 1. 
Worm-foul, s. birds which eat worms, 

5- SOS- 
Wort, s. unfermented beer, wort, G 813. 
Wortes. pi. herbs, B 4411, E 226. 
Worthen, v. be, dwell, T. v. 329 ; to 
become, 4. 248; Worth, jZ>r. s. is, {or, as 
fut.) shall be ; {hence) Wo worth, it is 
woe to, it shall be woe to, it is ill for, 
it shall be ill for, T. ii. 344; Wei worth 
of dremes ay thise olde wyves, it is 
well for these old wives as regards 
dreams, i. e. dreams are all very well 
for old women, T. v. 379; Wei worth 
[not worthe] of this thing grete clerkes, 
it is well for great writers as regards 
this thing, i. e. this thing is all very 
well for great writers, HF. 53; Worth 
upon, gets upon, B 1941 ; Worth up, 
get up on, mount, T. ii. loii. 
Wost, Wostow, Wot ; see Wite. 



©Iflssarial Entiex. 



127 



Wouke, s. week, T. iv. 1278, v. 492. 
Wounde, s. wound, i. 79; plague (Lat. 

phij^a), I 593; Woundes of Egipte, //. 

plagues ot Egypt (unlucky days so 

called), 3. 1207. 
Wowe, ger. to woo, T. v. 1091. 
Wowing, s. wooing, L. 1553. 
Woxen, pp. of Wexe. 
"Wrak, s. wreck, B 513. 
Wrak,//. J-. avenged, T, v. 1468. 
"Wrang", adv, wrongly, amiss (Northern), 

A 4252. 
Wrastlen, v. wrestle, B 3456. 
Wrathen, ger. to render angry, T. iii. 

174. 
Wraw. adj. angry, H 46 ; Wrawe, peevish, 

fretful, I 677. 
Wrawnesse, s. peevishness, fretfulness, 

I 680. 
Wrecche, s. sorrowful creature, A 931 ; 

wretched man, T. i. 708. 
Wrecche, adj. wretched, F 1020. 
Wrecchednesse, s. misery, B 3540; 

mean act, F 1523; folly, I 34; miserable 

performance, F 1271 ; miserable fare, H 

171. 
Wreche, s. vengeance, T. v. 890, 896. 
W^reek, imper. s. 0/" Wreke. 
Wreen, v. cover, clothe, R. 56 ; Wreigh, 

pi. s. covered, hid, T. iii. 1056. 
Wreke (wreks) , v. wreak, avenge, C 857 ; 

pr. s. siibj. avenge, L. 2340 ; 2 pr. pi. F 

454; Wrak, pt. s. T. v. 1468; Wreken, 

/•/>. revenged, F 784; Wroken, //. T. i. 

88. 
Wreker, s. avenger, 5. 361. 
Wrenches, s. pi. frauds, stratagems, 

tricks, G 1081. 
Wreste, v. constrain, force, T. iv. 1427. 
Wreye, v. bewray, reveal, A 3503. 
Wrig-hte, j. workman, A 614. 
Wring'e, v. squeeze, force a way, HF. 

2110; wring, HF. 299; Wrong, pt. s. 

wrung, pinched, D 492. 
Writ. s. scripture, A 739. 
Writ, -e, -en; see Wryte. 
Wrog-ht, -e; see Werche. 
Wroken, pp. of Wreke. 
Wrong", s.; had wrong, was wrong, 3. 

1282. 
Wrong, adv. astray, A 1267. 
Wrooth (wrooth), adj. wroth, angry, 3. 

513. 519- 

Wrot, //. s. wrote, T. i. 655. 

Wroteth, pr. s. tears with the snout, 
buries the snout, pokes about, I 157. 

Wrye, ger. to hide, T. iii. 1569; to dis- 
guise, T. i. 329; V. cover, E 887. 



Wrye, v. reveal, discover, flood with 
light, 4. 91. Variant of Wreye, q. v. 
[It might be better to read w) eye, and 
deye in 1. 90.] 

Wryen, v. turn aside, 3. 627 ; ger. to turn, 
go, T. ii. 906 ; //. s. bent, A 3283. 

Wryte, v. write, A 96; Writ, pr. s. 
writeth, writes, T. i. 394; Wroot, //. s. 
B 725 ; Wrot, T. i. 655 ; Writen, //. pi. 
wrote, HF. 1504; Write, i pi. s. subj. 
were to write, B 3843 ; Writen, pp. 
written, 2. 43. 

Wrythe, ger. to turn aside, 1\ iv. 9 ; to 
wriggle out, T. iv. 986; Wrytheth, pr. 
s. writhes out, throws forth wreaths of 
smoke (Lat. torqitei), B i. m 4. 10; 
Wryth, pr. s. writhes, wreathes, T. iii. 
1231. 

Wyd, adj. wide, A 491, 

Wyde, adv. widely, far, T. i. 629. 

Wyde-where, far and wide, everywhere, 
B136. 

Wyf, s. woman, C 71 ; wife, 3. 1082; mis- 
tress of a household, G 1015 ; to to., for 
wife, A i860; Wyves, //. women, wives, 
L. 484. 

Wyfhood, s. womanhood, B 76. 

Wy flees, adj. wifeless, E 1236. 

Wyfly, adv. womanly, wife-like, L. 1737. 

Wyke, s. week, T. ii. 430, 1273. 

Wyle, J. wile, plot, T. iii. 1077; subtlety, 
5- 215. 

Wyn, s. wine, A 334; wyn ape, H 44, 
wine which made a man behave like an 
ape (so also lion-wine, pig-wine, sheep- 
7vine) . 

Wynt,/r. s. turns, directs, L. 85; Wond, 
pt. s. wound, L. 2253. 

Wyr, s. bit, L. 1205. 

Wys, adj. wise, prudent, A 6%; to make 
if ivys, to make it a subject for delibera- 
tion, to hesitate, A 785. 

Wyse, s. way, manner, L. 20. 

Wyser, adj. wiser, one wiser than you, 
L. 2634. 

Wyte, s. blame, reproach, G 953 ; yo7o to 
wyte, for a blame to you, i. e. laid to 
your charge, R. 1541. 

Wyte, ger. to blame, T. i. 825 (under- 
stand is before nought) ; Wyten, v. 
accuse, I 1016. 



Y-, a prefix used especially with the pp., 
like the A. S.^^- and G.ge-. See below. 
It also occurs in the infinitive, as in 
y-finde, y-here, y-knozve, y-see, y-thee. 



128 



(glossarial hxHtx. 



It also occurs in the adjective y-sene. 

For further information, see under the 

forms of the infinitive mood ; e. g. for 

the infin. oiy-bake, see Bake. 
Yaf ; pt. s. of Yeve, to give. 
Yald,//. s. of Yelden, to yield. 
Yare, adj. ready, L. 2270. 
Yate, s. gate, T. ii. 617. 
Yave; see Yeve. 
Y-bake, pp. baked, L. 709. 
Y-toanisht, pp. banished, L. 1863. 
Y-barred,//. barred, R. 480. 
Y-bathed, pp. bathed, T. iv. 815. 
Y-bedded, //. put to bed, T. v. 346. 
Y-been, pp. been, B 4487. 
Y-benched,//. furnished with benches, 

L. 98 a. 
Y-beten, //. beaten, T. i. 741 ; beaten, 

forged, A 2162; formed in beaten gold, 

A 979; struck, coined, L. 1122. 
Y-blent, pp. blinded, R. 1610; A 3808; 

deceived, 3. 647. 
Y-blessed, //. blessed, B 4638. 
Y-bleynt, //. blenched, turned aside, 

■^ 3753- 
Y-blowe, pp. blown, T. i. 384. 
Y-boren,//. born, C 704, E 626; Y-bore, 

born, E 158; borne, carried, T. v. 1650; 

moved, F 326. 
Y-boug-ht, pp. bought, T. i. 810. 
Y-bounden, //. bound, 5. 268. 
Y-bowed, pp. diverted, B 4. p 6. 179. 
Y-brend,//. burnt, G 318 ; Y-brent, HF. 

940. 
Y-brog-ht, pp. brought, L. 938. 
Y-brouded, pp. embroidered, L. 159 a. 

Cf. A. S. brogden, pp. of bregdan. 
Y-caug-ht, // fixed, 3. 838. 
Y-chaped, pp. furnished with chapes or 

metal caps (which were placed at the 

end of the sheath), A 366. 
Y-cheyned, jz^/. chained, 17. 14. 
Y-clad, pp. clad, clothed, R. 890. 
Y-clawed, pp. clawed, torn, D 1731. 
Y-clenched, //. clinched, riveted, A 

1991. 
Y-cleped, pp. called, A 410, 867, G 129, 

H 2 ; invoked, T. iv. 504 ; summoned, 

B 2435 ; named, A 3313 ; Y-clept, called, 

A 376. 
Y-comen, pp. come, HF. 1074; ycome 

nboute, come about, passed, B 3364. 
Y-c6rouned,//. crowned, L. 219. 
Y-corumped,//. corrupted, B 5. p 2.28. 
Y-corven, pp. cut, G 533; Y-corve, A 

2013. See Kerve. 
Y-coupled, z/-. coupled, wedded, E 1219. 
Y-coyned, //. coined, C 770. 



Y-crased,//. cracked, broken, 3. 324. 
Y-cristned,//. baptized, B 240. 
Y-crowe,//. crowed, A 3357. 
Y-dampned, //. condemned, L. 2030. 
Y-darted,//. pierced with a dart, T. iv. 

240. 
Ydel, adj. idle, empty, vain, B 2778; tn 

ydel, in vain, B 2494, F 867. 
Y-dight, pp. decked, A 3205. 
Ydolastre, s. idolater, B 3377. 
Ydole, s. idol, 3. 626. 
Y-doon, pp. done, B 4610; over, E 

1894. 
Y-drad, //. dreaded, T. iii. 1775. 
Y-drawe, pp. drawn, A 396, 944. 
Y-dressed, pp. dressed, arranged, set, 

E381. 
Y-dronke, pp. drunk, B 2601. 
Y-dropped, pp. bedropped, covered with 

drops, A 2884. 
Ye, s. eye, R. 296; at ye, at eye, to sight, 

evidently, G 964, 1059 ; Saugh with ye, 

perceived, A 3415 ; Yen, //. eyne, eyes, 

B 3260, 3392. 
Ye, adv. yea, verily, T. i. 534. 
Yeddinges, pi. songs, A 237. 
Yede, //. s. walked, went, G 1141, 1281. 

A. S. eode. 
Yeer, s. year, A 347 ; Yere {in phr. many 

a yere), B 132; Yeres ende, year's end, 

D 916; Yeer by yere, year after year, 

B 1688; Fro yeer to yere, 5. 321; Yeer, 

{archaic) pi. A 82 ; Yeres, {new) pi. B 

463. 
Yef, imp. s. give, T, v. 308. 
Yeftes, //, gifts, T. iv. 392. 
Yelden, ^^r. to yield up, D 912; to yield 

to, pay, D 1811 ; Yelt, pr. s. yields, T. i. 

385 ; Yelde, pr. s. subj. requite, D 1772, 

2177 ; Yald, //. s. afforded, B 4. m 7. 25 ; 

Yeld, imp. s. restore, C 189; Yolden, 

pp. yielded, T. i. 801 ; submissive, T. 

iii. 96; Yeldinge, pres. pt. giving, B 

2994. 
Yeldhalle, s. guild-hall, A 370. 
Yelding', s produce, lit. 'yielding,' A 

596. 
Yelleden, //.//. yelled, B 4579. 
Yelpe, ger. to boast, A 2238 ; pr.pl. prate, 

T. iii. 307. 
Yelwe, adj. yellow, R. 310. 
Yeman, s. yeoman, A loi. 
Yemanly, adv. in a yeomanlike manner, 

A 106. 
Yen = Yex\,pl. eyes ; see Ye. 
Y-ended, pp. ended, R. 1315. 
Yerd, s. yard, garden, R. 492. 
Yerde, s. rod, stick, T. i. 257,740; switch. 



(glossarial 3Intiex. 



129 



A 149; rod, 'caduceus,' A 1387; yard 

(in length), A 1050; correction, E 22. 
Yerne, adj. eager, brisk, lively, A 3257. 
Yeme, adv. eagerly, soon, D 993 ; briskly, 

quickly, glibly, 5. 3 ; C 398; as y.,v&xy 

soon, HF. 910. 
Yerne, ger. to yearn for, to be longed 

for, T. iv. 198 ; v. desire, T. iii. 152. 
Yeten (ye^tsn), v. pour, shed, B i. m 7. i. 

A. S. geotan. 
Yeve, V. give, A 232; Yevest, 2 pr. s. 

givest, F 1033 ; Yeveth, //'. s. E 93 ; 

Yeve,/r, s. subj. may (he) give, E 30; 

Yaf, I pt. s. gave, E 861 ; Yaven,//. pi. 

G 415; Yeven, //, //. subj. would give, 

HF. 1708 ; Yeven, pp. given, A 1086 ; 

devoted, 7. iii. 
Yeveres,//. givers, I 791. 
Yeving-, s. giving, 18. 37; what one gives, 

4. 230. 
Yexeth,//-. s. hiccoughs, A 4151. 
Y-fallen, pp. fallen, B 3166; happened, 

G 1043 ; having befallen, C 496. 
Y-fare, pp. gone, T. iii. 577. 
Y-fela"Wshiped, //. made companions, 

B 2. p 6. 91. 
Y-fere, together, B 394, E 1113, G 380. Cf. 

Infere. 
Y-fet, pp. fetched, F 174, G 1116. 
Y-fetered.,//. fettered, A 1229. 
Y-fethered,//. feathered, R. 951. 
Y-feyned, pp. feigned, invented, L. 

327 a ; evaded, E 529. 
Y-ficched,//. fixed, B 4. p 6. 125. 
Y-flnde, v. find, F 470; Y-founde,//. L. 

1668. 
Y-flit, pp. moved, whirled along, B i. m 

2. 14. 
Y-folowed,//. followed, 3. 390. 
Y-forg-ed, //. made, A 3256. 
Y-formed, pp. created, HF. 490. 
Y-fostred, pp. fostered, sustained, E 213 ; 

brought up, A 3946, 
Y-founde, pp. found, A 121 1, 3514. 
Y-founded, //. set on a foundation, 5. 

231 ; based, 3. 922. 
Y-freten, pp. eaten, devoured, L. 1951. 
Y-frounced, adj. wrinkled, R. 155. 
Y-fyned, adj. refined, delicately formed, 

R. 1696. 
Y-fyred, pp. fired, L, 1013. 
Y-gerdoned, pp. rewarded, B 5. p 3. 

182. 
Y-geten,//. gotten, procured, A 3564. 
Y-glased,//. glazed, 3. 323. 
Y-glewed,//. fixed tight, F 182. 
Y-glosed, //>. flattered, H 34. 
Y-goon,//>, gone, L. 2206, 2213. 



Y-graunted, //. granted, C 388. 
Y-grave, pp. dug up, cut, L. 204; dug 

out, 3. 164; engraved, graven, A 3796; 

buried, D 496. 
Y-greved,//. harmed, A 4181. 
Y-grounde, //. ground, A 3991; sharp- 
ened, pointed, A 2549. 
Y-grounded,//. grounded, 3. 921. 
Y-growen,//. grown, A 3973. 
Y-halwed,//. consecrated, L. 1871. 
Y-harded,^/, hardened, F 245. 
Y-hated,/^. hated, HF. 200. 
Y-hent,//>, seized, caught, C 868. 
Y-herd, pp. as adj. covered with hair, 

A 3738. 
Y-here, v. hear, T. iv. 1313. 
Y-heried,//. praised, T. ii. 973. 
Y-hevied,//. weighed down, B 5. m 5, 

26. 
Y-hid, //. hid, G 317. 
Y-hight,//. called, T. v. 541. 
Y-holde, pp. esteemed to be, A 2374; 

celebrated, A 2958; considered, C 602; 

indebted, L. 1954 ; continued, E 1932 ; 

restrained, HF. 1286. 
Y-hurt,//. hurt, A 2709. 
Y-japed,//. jested, T. i. 318. 
Yif, conj. if, L. 2059, 2312. 
Yif , i?>ip. s. give ; see Yive. 
Yift, s. gift, 3. 247, 695, 1270. 
Yilden, ger. to repay, B 5. p i. 14; 

Yildeth, pr. s. yields, produces, B 4. 

m 6. 31. See Yelden. 
Y-joigned, pp. joined, B 2. p 6. 93. 
Yis, yes, L. 517. 
Yisterday, yesterday, R. 1040. 
Yit, yet, L. 4,' 106. 
Yive, ger. to give, A 225 ; Yiveth, pr. s, 

gives, 18. 38 ; pr. s. subj. may (he) give,. 

3. 683 ; Yiven, pp. given, granted, 3. 765. 
Yiver, s. giver, L. 2228. 
Y-kempt,//. combed, A 4369. 
Y-kist,//. kissed, T. iv. 1689. 
Y-kneled,//. kneeled, L. 1232. 
Y-knet, pp. knotted, tightly bound, T. 

iii. 1734; Y-knit, joined, 6. 32. 
Y-knowe, v. know, F 887 ; recognize, 

HF. 1336; discern, D 1370; pp. known, 

3- 392. 
Y-korven, pp. cut, B 1801. 
Y-koud,//. known well, 3. 666. 
Y-lad, pp. carried (in a cart), A 530. 
Y-laft, pp. left, A 2746; left behind, 

F 1128. 
Y-l&id, pp. laid, L. 2141. 
Y-lain, pp. lain, remained, L. 2410. 
Yle, s. isle, island, HF. 416, 440; region, 

province, L. 1425. 



I30 



(gl000arial Jzxititx. 



Y-lent,//. lent, G 1406. 

Y-lered.,//. educated, T. i. 976. 

Y-let, //. hindered, obstructed, B 5. 

P 4- 34. 
Y-leten, //. left, allowed, B 4. p 4. 

308. 
Y-leyd. //. laid, A 3568. 
Y-liche, adj. alike, similar, L. 389. 
Y-liche. adv. alike, equally, A 2526. 
Y-lissed,//. eased, T. i. 1089. 
Y-lived, />/>. lived, 1'. v. 933. 
Y-log-g-ed.//. lodged, B 4181. 
Y-loren, pp. lost, L. 26; Y-lorn,//. lost, 

T. IV. 1250. 
Y-lost,//. lost, HF. 183. 
Y-loved,//. loved, T. i. 594. 
Y-lyk, adj. like, A 592; alike, A 2734; 

Y-lyke, like, A 1539. 
Y-lyke, adv. alike, equally, L, 55, 731. 
Y-lymed,//. caught (as birds with bird- 
lime), D 934. 
Y-maad.//, made, caused, HF. 691. 
Ymag-^ries, p/. carved work, HF. 1190, 

1304. 
Ymagined, //. considered, intentional, 

I 448. 
Y-maked,//. made, L. 122, 222. 
Y-marked, pp. set down, marked out, 

planned, HF. 1103. 
Y-masked, //. enmeshed, T. iii. 1734. 
Y-medled,//. mingled, T. iii. 815. 
Y-mel, prep, among (Northern), A 4171. 
Y-ment, pp. intended, HF. 1742. 
Y-met, //. met, A 2624; Y-mette, as pi. 

adj. met, B 11 15. 
Y-meynd, pp. mixed, mingled, A 2170. 
Y-moeved,//. moved, B 4. m 6. 7. 
Ympne, s. lyric poem (lit. hymn), L. 

422. 
Y-mused, //. mused, reflected, HF. 

1287. 
Y-nempned,//. named, I 598. 
Y-nogh, adj. enough, sufficient, A 373, 

3149; Y-now, G 1018; Y-nowe, pi. 5. 

233- 
Y-nogh, adv. enough, sufficiently, 6. 13 ; 

Y-nough, R. 247. 
Y-nome,//'. caught, overcome, T. i. 242; 

taken, L. 2343. 
Y-norisshed, pp. educated, T. v. 821. 
Y-offred,//. offered, dedicated, L. 932. 
Yok, s. yoke, E 113, 1285. 
Yolde, -n ; see Yelden. 
YoWe, pr. pi. cry aloud, A 2672. 
Yomanrye, s. yeomanry, A 3949. 
Yon, adj. yon, A 4178. 
Yond. adv. yonder, A 1099. 
Yong", adj. young, A 79. 



Yong-hede, s. dat. youth, R. 351. 

Yore, adv. formerly, of old, B 174, 272; 
for a long time, a long while, A 1813 ; 
long ago, long, i. 150 ; yore ago?t, long 
ago, 5. 17 ; yore ago, A 3437 ; fid y., very 
long ago, 7. 243, 346 ; 0/ tyme y., of old 
time, F 963. 

Youling, s. loud lamentation, A 1278. 

Y-painted, pp. painted, R. 892. 

Y-passed, pp. passed, R. 380; past, 
E 1892. 

Y-payed,//. paid, A 1802. 

Y-piked. pp. picked over, G 941. 

Y-plesed.//. pleased, D 930. 

Y-pleyned, //. complained, T. iv. 1688. 

Y-pleynted, //. full of complaint, T. v. 

1597- 

Y-ploung-ed, //. plunged, sunk, B 3. 
p II. 122. 

Y-plyted, //. pleated, gathered, B i. 
P 2. 31. 

Ypocras, Hippocrates; Aence a kind of 
cordial, C 306. 

Ypocryte, s. hypocrite, F 514. 

Y-portreyd, pp. covered with pictures, 
R. 897. 

Y-porveyed, //. foreseen, B 5. p 3. 45. 

Y-prayed, pp. invited, E 269. 

Y-preised.//. praised, HF. 1577. 

Y-preved.//>. proved (to be), A 485. 

Y-pulled, //. plucked, i. e. with super- 
fluous hairs plucked out, A 3245. 

Y-purveyed, pp. foreseen, B 5. p 3. 88. 

Y-queynt,//!. quenched, A 3754. 

Y-quiked,//. kindled, I 536. 

Y-Quit, pp. quit, acquitted, F 673. 

Y-ratt, pp. bereft, snatched away, A 2015; 
reft, robbed, L. 1572, 

Yre, s. ire, anger, vexation, i. 30. 

Y-re6., pp. read, T. iv. 799. 

Y-reke, //. raked together, A 3882. 

Y-rekened, pp. accounted, D 367 ; taken 
into account, F 427. 

Yren, s. iron, R. 1184. 

Yren, adj. iron, G 759. 

Y-rent, pp. taken, T. v. 1654; torn, B 
844. 

Y-rong-e, //. rung, told loudly, HF. 
1655. 

Y-ronne, pp. run, A 8, 3893; continued, 
L. 1943 ; run together, A 2693 ; inter- 
laced, R. 1396; clustered, A 2165. 

Y-ro\ined. pp. whispered, HF. 2107. 

Y-satled, pp. settled, E 2405. 

Y-sayd, pp. said, 3. 270. 

Y-scalded, //. scalded, A 2020. 

Y-schette, pp.pl. shut, B 560. 

Yse, s. ice, HF. 1130. 



(^lossarial 3Intif.T. 



131 



Y-see, V. behold, T. ii. 354; imp. s. see, 

look, T. ii. 1253; Y-seyn, //. seen, L. 

2076. 
Y-sene. adj. visible, A 592, F 996; mani- 
fest, T. iv. 1607; L. 1394. h.'6. gesene, 

gesyne. 
Y-set, pp. set, A 4337 ; placed, 5. 149 ; set 

down, F 173; seated, C 392; appointed, 

A 163s ; planted, R. 604. 
Y-seye, //. seen, HF. 1367 ; Y-sevn, T. v. 

448. 
Y-seyled, //. sailed, B 4289. 
Y-shad, pp. scattered (Lat. sparsas), B 3. 

m 2. 33. 
Y-shaken, pp. quivering, sparkling, B i. 

m 3. 17. 
Y-shamed,//. put to shame, HF. 356. 
Y-shapen, {siro/ig) pp. shaped, prepared, 

B 3420; provided, A 4179; contrived, 

G 1080 ; Y-shaped, {weak) pp. pi-epared, 

T. iii. 1240. 
Y-shave, pp. shaven, A 690. 
Y-shent, //. put to shame, severely 

blamed, D 1312. 
Y-shette, pp. pi. shut, B 2159. 
Y-shewed, //. shown, T. v. 1251 ; made 

manifest, 4. 181. 
Y-shore, //. shorn, T. iv. 996. 
Y-shove,//. borne about, L. 726. 
Y-slayn, //. slain, HF. 159; Y-slawe, 

B 484. 
Y-smite, pp. smitten, wounded, B 3. 

m 7. 7. 
Y-song-e, pp. sung, D 1726; Y-songen, 

L. 270. 
Y-soug-ht, pp. sought, T. iii. 1317. 
Y-sounded.//. sunk, T. ii. 535. 
Y-sowen, pp. sown, HF. 1488. 
Y-sped, //. sped, A 4220. 
Y-spended,//. spent, B 5. p 4. 15. 
Y-sprad, pp. spread, B 1644; Y-spred, 

A 4140. 
Y-spreynd,//. sprinkled, A 2169. 
Y-sprong-e,/-/". sprung, shot out, R. 718; 

divulged, HF. 2081. 
Y-stalled, //>. installed, HF. 1364. 
Y-stiked, pp. stuck, A 1565 ; stabbed, 

F 1476. 
Y-stint,/;>. stopped, D 390. 
Y-stonde, pp. stood, been, T. v. 1612. 
Y-stong-e, pp. stung, C 355. 
Y-storve, pp. dead, A 2014. 
Y-strawed, //. bestrewn, 3. 629. 
Y-strike. pp. struck, 11. 34. 
Y-suffred, pp. suffered, T. v. 415. 
Y-sweped, //. swept, G 938. 
Y-sworn, /i/. sworn, A 1132; sworn (to 

do it), T. V. 283. 



Y-S"wowned, //. swowned, L. 1342. 
Y-take, //. caught, B 3514; taken, L. 

617. 
Y-thanked, //>. thanked, D 2118. 
Y-tliee. v. thrive, T. iv. 439. 
Y-thewed, pp. disposed; wel y-thewed, 

wi'U-conducted, 5. 47 ; R. 1008. 
Y-thonked, pp. thanked, T. iv. 2. 
Y-throngen, pp. confined, B 2. p 7. 53. 
Y-throwe, //. thrown, T. iv. 6; cast out, 

2. 8q. 
Y-told, pp. told, A 3109. 
Y-torned, //>. turned, B 4. m 5. i. 
Y-travailed, pp. laboured, with difficulty, 

E 5- P 3- 45- 
Y-trespassed, pp. sinned, B 2609. 
Y-tressed, //. plaited in tresses, T. v. 

810. 
Y-treted.//. discussed, B 4. p i. 70. 
Y-tukked, pp. tucked up, L. 982. 
Y-turned. pp. turned, A 1238, 2062. 
Y-twinned, pp. parted, T, iv. 788. 
Yve. B4156; see Erbe. 
Yvel, adj. ill, evil, T. ii. looi. 
Yvel, adv. ill, R. 213, 1067. 
Yveles, s. pi. evils, B 2618. 
Yvory, s. ivory, B 2066 ; Yvoire, 3. 

946. 
Y-voyded, //. removed, F 1159. 
Y-war, adj. aware, T. ii. 398. 
Y--warned, pp. warned, B 4422. 
Y-'waxen, pp. grown, become, T. v. 275 ; 

Y-waxe, 3. 1275. 
Y-wedded, pp. wedded, L. 1179. 
Y--went, pp. gone, HF. 976. 
Y-went, //. weened, imagined, T. v. 

444- 
Y-wet. pp. wetted, A 4155. 
Y-whet. pp. whetted, 7. 212. 
Y-wimpled, pp. provided with a wimple, 

A 470; covered with a wimple, L. 

797- 
Y-wis, adv. certainly, truly, verily, R. 

279- 350. 357- 
Y-wist, pp. known, B 5. p 3. 36. 
Y-wonne, pp. gained, T. iv. 1315 ; won, 

D 2293 ; arrived, L. 2427. 
Y-"WOrthe. //>. become, 3. 579. 
Y-wounde, pp. wound, covered up, 12. 

18. 
Y-woven, pp. woven, completed, L. 

2360. 
Y-woxen, pp. grown, E 1462. 
Y--writen,//. written, 5. 124, 141. 
Y-writhen, //. wreathed, wrapped 

round, R. 160. 
Y-wroght, pp. made, A 196, B 2054; 

shaped, L. 1 173 ; depicted, 3. 327 ; orna- 



132 



(glogsarial 3Intiex. 



mented, R. 897 ; Y-wroghte, //. //. 
fashioned, 5. 123. 

Y-wroken, pp. avenged, 16. 26 ; Y-wroke, 
wreaked, T. v, 589. 

Y-wrong-e, //. forced, !>. 2527. 

Y-wryen, pp. hidden, T. iii. 1451 ; cov- 
ered, A 2904. 

Y-yeve. pp. given, T. iii. 1376; Y-yive, 
T. iii. 1611. 



Z. 

Zeles, pi. zeal, T. v. 1859. 

Zodia, s. pi. beasts, A. i. 21. 61. 

Zodiac, s. zodiac, A. pr. 109. An imagi- 
nary belt in the heavens, of the breadth 
of 12°, along the middle of which runs 
the ecliptic. The Astrolabe only showed, 
the no7thern hal/oi this belt. 



GLOSSARY TO FRAGMENTS B AND C OF 
THE ROMAUNT OF THE ROSE. 

FRAGMENT B = 11. 1706-5810. 
FRAGMENT C = 11. 5811-7698. 

The following Glossary (which includes proper names) is separated from the preceding because 
Fragments B and C of the Romaunt are not by Chaucer. 

Fragment B abounds in Northern words and forms. Words in Fragment C have ' C ' prefixed 
to the number of the line. 



A, V. (to) have, 4322. 

Abandoun: in abandoun, fully, without 

stint, 2342. 
Abawed, pp. amazed, 3646; Abawid, 

4041. 
Abaysshed, jz^/. cast down, 3370. 
Abey, v. (y^r Abeye), suffer (for it), pay 

(for it), C 6713. See Abye. 
Abiding", s. delay, 2222. 
Abit, s. habit, dress, religious dress, 4914. 
Abit, Abood; see Abyde. 
Abood, s. delay, C 7697. 
Aboven, adv. in luck, 4352. 
Abraide, v. start up, break forth, 5156; 

Abraid, i pt. s. awoke, 1806; Abreyde, 

pt. s. broke out, 3967. 
Abrede, adv. abroad, 2563. 
Absente, pr. s. subj. abstain, refrain, 

4911. 
Abstinence-Streyned, i. e. Constrained 

Abstinence (personified), C 6341, 7366. 
Abyde, ger. to await, 4910; v. expect, 

5329 ; watch for, 4913 ; Abit, pr. s. 

dwells, 4977, 4989; stays, 5012; Abood, 

I pi, s. endured, waited, 3694. 
Abye, v. pay for, C 5888,5976; Abyeth, 

pr. s. C 7642. 
Accord, I pr. s. agree to, 2083 ; Accorded, 

pt.pl. agreed, C 5815; pp. reconciled, 

C 5846. 



A-cold, adj. cold, chilly, 2658. 

Acoye, v. quiet, allay, 3564. 

Acquyte, v. defray the expense, pay for, 

C 6742. 
Ado (for at do), to do, 5080. 
A-fere, adv. on fire, 4073. 
Afered, pp. afraid, 3604. 
Affray, s. terror, 3866; fear, 2034. 
Affrayed, //. frightened, 3113. 
Affye, v. trust, 3155. 
Aforn, adv. formerly, 3952. 
Aftir, prep, according to, 2255. 
Afyne, adv. completely, 3690. 
Agast, adj. afraid, C 6106. 
Ageyn-coming-, s. returning, 2518. 
Ageyns, prep, in comparison with, 5536. 
Agilte, pr. s. sinned against, offended, 

C 5833. 6784; Agiltest, 2pt. s. C 7572. 
Ago, pp. gone, 2932. 
A-gree, adv. in good part, 4349. 
A-greeif , adv. in bad part ; ta^e not agree/, 

take it not amiss, C 7573. 
Aken, v. ache, C 6908. 
Al, co?ij. although, 1754. 
Al-day, adv. continually, 2484. 
Alder, adj. gen. pi. of (us) all, C 6948. 
Alderfirst, adv. first of all, C 7505. 
Alegged, pt. pi. alleviated, 1768. See 

Allege. 
Alegg'ement, s. alleviation, 1890, 1923. 



133 



134 



(^losgarial IixHtx, 



Alg"ate, adv. alway, always, 5157, C 7477 ; 

at any rate, C 7152. 
Allege, V. exempt (lit. alleviate), C 6626; 

Alleggith,/r, s. alleviates, 2588. 
Alleg-eaunce, s. alleviation, 1871. 
All0"we, V. approve of, value, 5186. 
Almesse, s. alms, C 6624. 
Al-only, adv. alone, C 5819. 
Alosed.,//. noted, famed, 2354. 
Al-out, ndv. altogether, 2101, 2935. 
Al-outerly, adv. utterly, C 6302, 7663. 
Alowe, V. accept, approve of, 5175. 
Also, cof/J. as, C 6767. 
Amende, v. advance, succeed, C 5876. 
Among", adv. sometimes, 2325, 3241, 3304. 
Amourettes, s.pl. sweethearts, 4755. 
Amyas, a curious error ; for At Myas, 

i. e. at Meaux, 3826. F. text, a Aliaus. 
And, conj. if, 2051, 4441. 
Anger, s. pain, anguish, 1877; Angres, 

pi. torments, 2554, 3789. 
Angerly, adv. cruelly, 3511. 
Angre,^^;-. to vex, 3526. 
Angry, adj. cruel, 2628, 3265. 
Anguissous, adj. anxious, 1755. 
Anker, s. an anchoress, a female recluse 

shut up either in a cell attached to 

a church, or living under a religious 

rule in her own house, C 6348. 
Anon-right, adv. straightway, 1778. 
Anoy, s. discomfort, pain, vexation, 1919, 

2099, 4404. 
Anoynt, jZ)/. anointed, 1888. 
Apaired,//. s. injured, C 7522, 
Apayed, pp. satisfied, 2854, 5631. 
Aperceyved,//, s. perceived, C 6312. 
Aperceyving, s. perception, C 6318. 
Apert, adj. open, obvious, C 6621. 
Apostlis newe, i. e. the preaching friars, 

C 6270. 
Apparence, s. mere outward appearance, 

5550 ; evidence, C 7660. 
Apparent, adj. distinct, 2583. 
Appert, adj. open, C 6150. See Apert, 
Appose, v. oppose, C 6555, 7146. F. 

text, oposer. 
A-queynt, pp. acquainted, 3080. 
Aqueyntable, adj. affable, 2213. 
Arace. v. pull out, 1752. 
Arblasters,j.//,men with crossbows, 4196. 
Ares6neth, pr. s. reasons with, argues, 

C 6220. 
Arest, s. rest (for a spear), C 7561. 
Arette, v. impute, 3327. 
Areyse, v. raise up, 4361 ; rouse, C 7159. 
A-ro^Are, adv. in a row, C 7606. 
Ascape. v. escape, get out of the diffi- 
culty, C 6515. 



Asker, s. one who begs, C 6674. 
A-slope, adv. aside, awry, 4464. 
Assay, s. attempt, 3449 ; quality, temper, 

435°- 

Assayed, pp. tried, proved, 2688. 

Asseth, a sufficiency, 5600. 

Assoile, V. absolve, C 6364 ; //. explained, 
C 6557. 

Assoiling, s. absolving, C 6412. 

Assured, pp. secured, 4309. 

Astat, s. state, plight, 2416; Astate, con- 
dition, 4672, C 6856. 

Astoned,//. astonished, 3859. 

A-sundir, adv. diversely, 4477. 

A-swone, in a swoon, 1736. 

At, prep, at the hands of, from, C 6870; 
At al, at all points, 5249; a^ leeste way, 
at least, C 5827 ; at wordis fewe, in a few 
words, briefly, 2129. 

Attendith, pr. s. attaches itself, apper- 
tains, 5309. 

Attour, ,r. array, 3718. 

Augustins, s.pl. Austin Friars, C 7461. 

Aumenere, s. purse for alms, 2271. 

Auntre, v. refi. venture, 2495. 

Avale, v. descend, 1803. 

Avaunced,//. promoted, C 6951 ; helped, 
3468. 

Avaunt, adv. in advance, forward, 3959, 
4790. 

Avaunt, v. reji. boast, 4788. 

Avauntage, s. profit, 5808. 

Avenaunt, adj. becoming, seemly, 2058; 
pleasant, 3679 ; condescending, 4622. 

Aventure, s. chance, fortune, fate, 2118, 
4376 ; case, C 7308. 

Avouterye, s. adultery, 4954. 

Avysed, i //. s. reJi. ; Avysed me, ap- 
plied myself, 1807. 

Awayte, s. ambush, 4497. 

Awayted, //. watched ; awayted with, 
watched by, 3066. 

Axe, v. ask, C 6559. 

Ayeines, /;■<?/. against, C 7178. 



Bachilere, s. young knight, 2828. 

Bagge, s. purse, C 6834. 

Baillye, s. custody, jurisdiction, 4217; 

enclosure, C 7574. 
Balaunce, s. suspense, 4667. 
Balis, s.pl. troubles, sorrows, 4441. 
Bane, s. death, 4491. 
Baren, pt. pi. bare, C 6243. 
Baronage, s. the assembly of barons, 

C 5812. 
Bataile, s. host, C 5849; //. battalions, 

C 7348. 



Eomaimt of tje Eose: Parts b, c. 



35 



Batayled, ^/, battlemented, 4200. 

Bate, s. strife, 4235. 

Baud, adj. ioUy (lit. bold), 5674. 

Bayly, s. bailiff, C 6218. 

Beau-sire, s. fair sir, C 6053. 

Bede, v. stretch out (lit. proffer), 1710. 

Bede, />/. s. subj. might pray, C 7374. 

Bedels, s.pl. officers, C 6812. 

Beg"g"er, s. Beguin, hence, mendicant, 

C 7282 ; Beggers, Beguins, C 7256. 
Beg-yne, s. Beguine, C 7368. 
Bemes, s. pi. trumpets, C 7605, 
Berafte, //. fl. subj. should deprive, 

C 6669. 
Bern, s. barn, 5589. 
Besaunt, s. bezant, 5592. 
Besinesse, s. diligence, 3624. 
Bestial, adj. stupid, C 6716. 
Bete, />/'. s. subj. cure, 4441. 
Bialacoil, i. e. Bial Acoil, Fair Reception, 

2984, 2999, 301 1. 
Bigoon, adj. ; wel bigoon, well off, 5533. 
Big-yns, s.pl. Beguines, C 6861. 
Biheest, s. promise, 4446, 4474. 
Bihote, V. promise, 4446. 
Bihove, s. dat. behoof, 2964. 
Bilefte, ipt. s. remained, 3360. 
Bimene, iinp. s. rejl. bemoan thyself, 

2667. 
Biset, pt. s. employs, 5262. 
Bishet, pp. shut up (in prison), 4488. 
'Bit,pr. s. abides, 5330, 
Bitaught, pt. s. commended, 4438. 
Bitrasshed, //>. betrayed, 3910. 
Blake, adj. pi. black (monks), Bene- 
dictines, C 6695. 
Blende, ger. to blind, to deceive, 3954; 

Blent,//, deceived, C 6652. 
Blered, pp. bleared, dimmed, deceived, 

3912. 
Blinne, v. desist from, C 6611. 
Blyve, adv. quickly; as bl., very quickly, 

2799. 
Boden, pp. commanded, 2721. 
Boece, Boethius, 5661. 
Book ; the book, i. e. the Canon Law, 

C 6385 ; the Bible, C 6636. 
[Borders, s.pl. C 6911. Better reading; 

for burdens.] 
Bbrdillers, s.pl. brothel-keepers, C 7034. 
Borowe, s. pledge, C 7331. 
Bosarde, s. buzzard, 4033. 
Bote, s. remedy, 1760. 
Botes, s. pi. boots, 2265, C 7262. 
Botoun, s. bud, 1721, 1761, 2960. 
Bougerons, s.pl. sodomites, C 7022. 
Bought, pp.; a bought, to have bought, 

4322. 



Bountee, s. kindness, 3147; goodness, 

C 6597. 
Braide, ger. to bestir itself, wake up, 

C7128. 
Braste, ger. to burst, 3186. 
Brede, s. breadth ; on dr., abroad, 3635. 
Breken, v. disobey, 3478. 
Brenne, v. burn, 2475. 
Brenning", s. burning, 2727. 
Brere, s. briar, C 6191. 
Brest, V. burst, 4107. 
Breve, adj. short, 2350. 
Brimme, adj. cruel, 1836, 
Brocag'es, s.pl. contracts, C 6971. 
Brond, s. fire-brand, 3706. 
Burdens, error for Borders, C 691 1. 
Burdoun, s. staff, cudgel, 3401. 
Burnettes, s. pi. dresses made of fine 

woollen cloth dyed brown, 4756. 
But-if, C071J. unless, 1962. 
Buxom, adj. obedient, pliant, 4419. 
By, prep, in, C 6616; beside, C 7032. 
By and by, in order, 2345 ; precisely, 

4581. 
Bye, V. buy, pay for, 2052. 
Bytinge,/r^j./a/Y. cutting, C 7420. 

C. 

Caas, s. case, plight, 3374 ; //. cases, 

C 6759. 
Caleweys, s.pl. soft, sweet pears (which 

came from Cailloux in Burgundy), C 

7043- 

Calle, V. recall, 3974. 

Camelyne, s. camel's-hair stuff, C 7367. 

Can, xpr. s. (I) know, 4796; pr. s. under- 
stands, C 5872 ; Can him no thank, 
offers him no thanks, 2112; Canst, 
■2pr. s. feelest, 4399. 

Caribdis, Charybdis, 4713. 

Carmes, s. pi. Carmelites, White Friars, 
C 7462. 

Cas, s. occasion, C 7481. 

Caste, V. refl. apply himself, 2031 ; Cast, 
pr. s. casts, 4330 ; considers, 5620 ; Caste, 
pt. s. reji. set himself, i860. 

Castels in Spayne, castles in the air, 

2573- 
Casting", s. vomit, C 7288. 
Catel, s. property, 5376. 
Cause ; m cause, to blame, 4525. 
Caytif, s. poor wretch, 3554. 
Chace, v. chase away ; do ch., caused to 

be chased away, C 7534. 
Chafe. V. irritate, 3685. 
Chamberere, s. chamber-maid, 4935. 
Chanoun, s. canon, 3278. 



136 



(glossarial liiHtx. 



Chapitre, s. chapter, C 6532. 
Chapman, s. trader, 5591. 
Charg-id, //. s. instructed, 2145. 
Chasteleyn, s. castellan, governor of 

a castle, C 6327. 
Chasteleyne, s. the wife of a chastelain 

or governor of a castle, 3740. 
Chastye, i pr. s. reprove, C 6993. 
Chere, s. countenance, favour, 3952; 

appearance, 5486, C 6474; delight, 3805. 
Cherete, s. fondness, 3516. 
Chese, v. choose, 4426; Chese . . . hem 

\o, pr.pl. choose for themselves, C 6230. 
Chevered, Z/-. shivered, 1732. 
Chevisaunce, s. resource, remedy, 3337. 
Chevise, v. occupy himself (for me), 

manage (for me), settle my cause, C 

6425. 
Chictie, adj. parsimonious, 5588. 
Chideresse, s. scold, virago, 4266. 
Chinche, adj. mean, avaricious, C 5998. 

Nasalised form of Chiche. 
Chinchy, adj. mean, grudging, niggardly, 

C 6002. 
Cierg-is,//. wax tapers, C 6248. 
Clarree, s. a sweet liquor consisting of 

a mixture of wine, clarified honey and 

various spices, as pepper and ginger, 

&c., C 5967, 5971. 
Clepe, V. call, C 5907. 
Clipsy, adj. eclipsed, dim, 5349. 
Clomben,/'/. climbed up, C 6933. 
Cloos, adj. close, discreet, C 6104. 
Close, V. enclose, 4372. 
Closer, s. enclosure, 4069. 
Cloth, s. dress, C 6345. 
Colour, s. way, manner, C 6282. 
Come, s. coming, C 7628. 
Compas, s. circuit, 1842; circumference, 

4183 ; Compace, perfection, 3208. 
Compassen, i pr. pi. study, observe 

closely, C 6932. 
Complisshen, v. accomplish, 2132. 
Comprende, v. consider, include (in my 

explanation), C 6633. 
Compte, s. counting, account, 5026. 
Comunably, adv. commonly, usually, 

C 7237. 
Comunely, adv. publicly, 4801. 
Comuntee, s. community, common pos- 
session, 5209. 
Concours. s. course, result, 4360. 
Conestablerye, s. a ward of a castle 

under the command of a constable, 

4218. 
Coninges, s.pl. conies, rabbits, C 7044. 
Conisaunce, s. understanding, know- 
ledge, ,5465, 5559 ; acquaintance, 4668. 



Conjecte, i pr.pl. conspire, C 6928. 

Conne, 2 pr. s. subj. mayst be well in- 
structed, 2315. 

Consequence, s. result, C 6448. 

Consolacioun, the * Consolation of Phi- 
losophy,' 5661. 

Constreynaunce, s. constraint, C 7438. 

Contene, v. remain, 2641 ; refi. bear him- 
self, 2248; Conteyne, I'. contain (himself), 
4923 ; Contene, pr. pi. refi. maintain 
themselves, C 6805, 

Contrarie, s. perplexity, 4478. 

Contrarious, adj. hostile, 3354. 

Controve, v. compose songs, 4249; ger. 
to invent, C 7547. 

Contune, v. continue, 4354, 5332. 

Convay, ger. to accompany, 2428. 

Corage, s, mood, temper, 4928. 

Cordileres, s. pi. Franciscans, (so called 
from wearing a girdle of rope), C 7461. 

Cornewayle, Cornouaille in Brittany, 
4250. 

Corumpable, adj. corruptible, 4856. 

Cos, s. kiss, 3663. 

Cost, s. coast, place, 3931 ; quarter, 2477. 

Cotidien, adj. quotidian, daily; as s. 
a quotidian ague, 2401. 

Conclaexi, pr. pi. impose, C 6903. 

Countesses, s.pl. C 6860. 

Countours, s.pl. accountants, C 6812. 

Coupe-g-org-e, s. Cut-throat, C 7422. 

Couth,//, known, 2000; evident, 4213. 

Coveityse, s. coveting, desire, 4129; 
covetousness, 5072. 

Covenable, adj. seemly, fitting, suitable, 
C 6020, 6752; excellent, C 7181. 

Covent, s. convent, 4904, C 7380. 

Coverchief, s. kerchief, head-covering, 
C 7369. 

Covert, adj. secret, hidden up, C 6149. 

Coverture, s. concealment, 2172. 

Covyne, s. intrigue, secret plan, 3799. 

Coy, adj. quiet, hidden, 4297. 

Crece.j. increase, progeny,4875. {Fortened 
crece seems to mean destroyed progeny, 
i. e. abortion.) See crease (= increase) 
in the New E. Diet. 

Croce, s. crozier, C 6470. 

Crownet, s. coronet, 3203. 

Cunne, v. shew; cunne him maugree, 
shew him ill-will, 4559; i pr. pi. can, 
C 5879; pr. pi. know (how), C 6174; 
/;•. s. subj. be able, C 5992. 

Cure, s. charge, 1962, C 6562; care, 4222; 
cause of care, 2456; heed, C 7557; aid, 
C 6752; jurisdiction, 3540. 

Curious, adj. diligent, zealous, C 6578, 
6590. 



Eomaunt of tl^e Kosc: Parts b, c. 



137 



Customere, adj. accustomed, 4936. F. 

text, cousturniere. 
Cut, pr. s. cuts, C 6198. 

D. 

Dagrges, s. pi. loose tags or shreds of 
cloth, C 7260. (I can find no exact 
account of the fastening here referred 
to ; I suppose that the dagges^ or tape- 
like strips, had button-holes, through 
which ihe knoppes or buttons passed.) 

Daliaunce, s. talk, 2850. 

Dampning, s. damnation, C 6643. 

Dar, /;-. s. dare, 6049, 

Daunce ; the olde d., the old game, 4300. 

Daungere, s. resistance, 1932 ; reluctance, 
2318; power, control, 2051. 

Daungerous, adj. shy, reluctant, back- 
ward, 2312; hard to please, 2824; cruel, 

3594. 3727- 
Daunte, v. conquer, subdue, 3300. 
Daunting', s. taming, 4032. 
Dawed, pt. s. subj. would dawn, 2633. 
Dawes, s. pi. days, 2838, C 6616. 
Debonairly, adv. graciously, pleasantly, 

2382. 
Defaute, s. lack, 5789. 
Defenced,//. defended, 4310. 
Defensable, adj. helping to defend, 4168. 
Defoule, c'. trample down, C 6000. 
Defyle. v. bruise, C 7317. 
Degree, s. rank, C 7214 ; manner, C 7442. 
Deignous, adj. disdainful, 3593. 
Del, s. deal; Dele, bit, least thing, 5139; 

not . . a del, not a whit, C 6897, 7433 ; 

never a del, not at all, C 6036 ; every del, 

every whit, C 6017. 
Delectacioun, s. delight, 4821. 
Deles (Northern form), pr. s. distributes, 

5419- 
Deliciously, adv. daintily, C 6729. 
Deliverly, adv. quickly, 1927, 2283, 3005. 
Delyces, s.pl. pleasures, C 7281. 
Demeigne, s. possession, ownership, 

5586; Demeyne, dominion, rule, 3310. 
Demene, v. put up with, 5238. 
Depart, v. divide, 2367, 5279. 
Departing, s. division, 4613. 
Dere, v. injure, destroy, 4336; //. 2100. 
Desert, s. deserving, 4269. 
Desperaunce, s. desperation, 1872. 
Desporte, ger. to cheer, to divert, 2014, 
Despyt, s. aversion, C 5996. 
Dever, j-. endeavour, 5299. 
Deviaunt, adj. divergent, turned away, 

4789; 
Devoid, adj. free, 4312. 
De voided, //. removed, 2929. 



Devyne, v. interpret, 3800. 

Devys, s. disposal, 1974; will, 3621; by 

devys, to judge from her appearance (?), 

3205. (F. text, et a son vis.) 
Deyned, pt. s. subj.; him deyned, it 

appeared good to him, C 6950. 
Deynous, adj. disdainful, 3728. 
Deyntee, s. value, 2677. 
Diffyne, v. define, 4807. 
Dight, v. prepare, 4240. 
Discomfit,//!, disconcerted, 4067. 
Discordaunce, s. disagreement, 4715, 

5208 ; discordant melody, 4251. 
Discorde, ger. to disagree, 4716. 
Discreven, 2 pr.pl. describe, 4803. 
Disdeinous, adj. disdainful, C 7412. 
Disese, s. uneasiness, 5244, 
Disese,^^r. to trouble, 3526. 
Disgysen, v. apparel, 2250; Disgyse, 

I /;-. s. disguise, C 6358. 
Dishonest, adj. unfair, unreasonable, 

3442 ; immodest, 4262. 
Disordinat, adj. inordinate, 4816. 
Dispendith, //-.//. spend, 5681. 
Dispitous, adj. unmerciful, spiteful, C 

6162; malicious, froward, 2212, 3457. 
Displesaunce, s. displeasure, 3436, 
Disport, s. delight, 3468 ; happiness, 2894. 
Disrewlily, adv. irregularly, 4900. 
Disseise, v. dispossess, deprive, (F. des- 

saisir), 2076. 
Disserve, v. deserve, 3093. 
Disseyved, pp. deceived, C 6628. 
Dissolucioun, j. dissoluteness, 4898. 
Distincte, v. distinguish, C 6199. 
Distoned, adj. out of tune, 4248. 
Ditee, s. discourse, 5286, 5652. 
Divyne, s. divinity, C 6488. 
Do, V. cause ; do make, cause to be made, 

2080; pr. s. subj. accomplish, C 5869; 

Doand (Northern), pres. part, doing, 

2708 ; Don, pp. put, placed, C 6564. 
Dole, s. lamentation, mourning, 2956, 

4317. O. F. doel. 
Dolven, pp. buried, 4070. 
Dom, s. dumb, 2220, 2409, 2492. 
Dool, s. grief, 4480. 
Dool, s. portion ; halfe^i dool, half portion, 

halving (it), 2364. 
Doth, pr. s. causes, 2772, 2786, 2790 ; brings, 

5558 ; gives, 1984. 
Double, adj. twofold, 1756. 
Doublenesse, s. double-dealing, du- 
plicity, 2366. 
Doun, come down, C 5868. 
Dout, s. fear, 2102. 
Doutable, adj. doubtful, 5413 ; imperilled, 

unstable, C 6274. 



F 2 



138 



(§lo0saiial 3intiex. 



Doute , V. fear, 2023 ; i />/: s. 2108 ; 2 />/: pi. 
2079. 

Douting", s. doubt, C 6074. 

Draught, s. draught, bout, act, 4869. F. 
text, Car viaint ni trairoioit ja trait. 

Drede, s. doubt; withouten dr., without 
doubt, 2199, 2251, C 6214; Dread (per- 
sonified), 3958, 5861. 

Drerihed, s. sorrow, 4728. 

Dresse, v. prepared, 1773; //'. s. siibj. rejl. 
set himself, C 6535. 

Dreye, adj. dry, 1743. 

Drough,//. s. drew, 1725. 

Droune,^^r. to be drowned, 4710, 5022. 

Druery, s. loyal affection, 5064. 

Drye, v. suffer, undergo, 4390; endure, 
3105 ; ger. to fulfil, C 7484. 

Dulle, I pr. s. become stupefied, 4792. 

Dure, V. last, endure, C 6841. 

Duresse, s. severity, 3547, 3570. 

Dwelling-, s. delay, 2440. 

Dyamaunt, s. adamant, 4385. 

Dyden, //.//. died, C 6245, 

Dyne, v. as s. dinner, C 6500. 

E. 

Eche, V. add, 1994; help, aid, 4618. 

Effect, s. reality, 5486. 

Eft, adv. again, 1783. 

Eftsone, adv. soon afterwards, C 6094; 

Eftsones, C 6649. 
Egre, adj. acid, 4179. 
Eg-re, adv. sharply, 5474. 
Elde, s. old age, 4885. 
Eleng'enesse, s. solitariness ; hence, 

sadness, disquietude, C 7406. F. text, 

soussi. 
Elis, s.pl. eels, C 7039. 
Elles, «^z/. otherwise, in all other respects, 

3429- 

Empressid, //. pressed, 3691. 

Empryse, s. undertaking, care, 2147; 
doings, 3508 ; enterprise, C 5825 ; design, 
1972 ; conduct, action, 2186 ; privilege, 
2008 ; rule, 4905. 

Enchesoun, s. occasion, 2504, 3982, 4242. 

Enclyne, v. be subject (to), respect, bow 
down (to), C 6814. 

Encombre, v. disturb, 5434 ; pr. s. impor- 
tunes, teases, C 6675 ; pr. pi. perplex, 
4482; pp. annoyed, C 7628. 

Enfaunce, s. infancy, youth, 4288. 

Enforce, v. compel, C 6407; pr. pi. rejl. 
endeavour, C 6275 ; //. augmented, 
4499. 

Engendrure, s. procreation, 4849. 

Engreveth,/?-. s. displeases, 3444. 



Enhaunce, ger. to exalt, advance, C 7246. 

Enlang-oured, adj. faded with langour, 
pale, C 7399. 

Enlumined.//. illumined, 5344. 

Enpryse, s. quickness of movement, 2636. 
See Empryse. 

Enquestes, s. pi. legal inquisitions, C 
6977. 

Ensure, \pr. s. assure, 4850; pp. C 7212. 

Entayle, s. figure, shape, 37 11. 

Entencioun, s. attention, 4701 ; intent, 
C 6258 ; diligence, 2027 ; of e., inten- 
tionally, 2976; pi. meaning, drift, C 
7170. ' 

Entende, v. pay attention, 2153. 

Entendement, s. intention, 2188. 

Entent, s. mind, 2187; purpose, 2488; 
disposition, 5696; endeavour, 3906; in- 
tention, design, C 5811, 5869. 

Ententif , adj. diligent, careful, 2022 ; adv. 
1720. 

Entermete, v. rejl. intermeddle, interfere, 
2966; \pr. s. rejl. busy (myself with), C 
6971. 

Entremees, s.pl. entremets, dainty meats, 
C 6841. 

Entremete, v. interfere, C 6635, 7233; 
ger. C 6503 ; ger. rejl. C 5946 ; i pr. s. 
intermeddle, interfere, C 6498, 6840 ; pr. 
s. C 5921. 

Bnviroun, adv. about, 3203, 4163 ; round 
about, 4203. 

Enviroune, i pr. pi. go about, C 7017. 

Equlpolences, j.//. equivocations, equi- 
vocal expressions, C 7076. 

Erke, adj. weary, wearied, 4867. 

Ernes, s. ardour (of love) , 4838. 

Ernest, s. earnest, pledge, 3680. 

Ers, s. posteriors (F. ctd), C 7578. 

Espleyten, v. perform, execute, C 6174. 

Espye, s. spy, 3871. 

Establisshing-, s. decree, C 6369. 

Estate, s. state of life, position, 4901. 

Estres, s. pi. recesses, inner parts, 3626. 

Existence, s. reality, 5549, C 7470. 

Expowne, ger. to expound, C 7172. 

Eyth, adj. easy, 3955. A. S. eais. 



Fable, s. deceitfulness, C 6602. 
Fade, adj. pallid, faded, 2399. 
Fadome, s.pl. fathoms, 4159. 
Failed, pp. as adj. wanting, defective, C 

7470. 
Fainte, adj. feigned, C 7405. 
Fairhede, s. fairness, beauty, 2484. 
Fallaces, s. pi. deceits, C 7077. 



i^omaimt of tfje l^ose: Parts B, c. 



139 



Pallith, pr.5. impers. befits, 4025 ; belongs, 
C 6976. 

Falsen, pr.pl. deceive, 4833. 

Fand, pt. pi. found, 2707. 

Fard, //;//. s. paint, 2285. 

Fardels, s. pi. loads, bundles, 5683. 

Fare, s. welfare, condition, C 6498. 

Fare, v. depart, vanish away, C 6045 ; 
pr. pi. go, 5564 ; journey, 5509 ; pp. gone, 
2710. 

Faute, s. fault, defect, 3837. 

Fawe, adj. fain, blithe, C 6476. 

Fay, s. faith, 2155, 5106. 

Fee, s. property, fief, C 6044. 

Feers, adj. fierce, 3372. 

Feeste, s. encouragement, 5061. 

Fel, adj. cruel, savage, 221 1 ; harsh, 4028; 
stern, C 7342; Felle,//. painful, 3789. 

Felde-fare, s. field-fare, 5510. 

Fele, adj. many, 4446, C 6038. 

Fele, V. perceive (smell), 1844, 

Feller, adj. comp. crueller, 4103. 

Felones, adj. pi. evil, wicked, C 671 1. 
His f. iangelinges, his evil pratings, his 
injurious talk. Suggested by F. Maugre 
les felonesses jangles ; yNhere felonesses is 
a plural adjective ; see Godefroy. 

Feloun, adj. cruel, C 5998. 

Fere, s. fire, 2471, 5086. 

Fered,//. fired, inflamed, 5278. 

Fetisly, adv. neatly, perfectly, 2267. 

Fetys, adj. well-made, 2088. 

Feynte, adj. feigned, 5563. 

Feyntyse, s. deceit, guile, 2947, 2998, 
3492; evasion, 1971. 

Fiaunce, s. confidence, trust, 5481. 

Fil, pt. s. fell, condescended, 3437 ; Fille, 
pt.pl. found themselves, C 5813. 

Fit, s. mood, 5197. 

Flawme, s. flame, 3707. 

Flawnes, s.pl. flawns; a dish composed 
of new cheese, eggs, powdered sugar, 
coloured with saffron and baked in 
small tins called ' coffins ' ; C 4042. 

Flayn, 7)/. flayed, C 7316. Miswritten slayn. 

Flemed, pt. s. exiled, drove into exile, 
3052, C 6781. A. S.^yman. 

Floytes, s.pl. flutes, 4251. 

Foles, gen. fool's, 5266. 

Foly, adj. foolish, 4299, 5085. 

Fond, adj. foolish, 5367. 

Fonde, v. attempt, 5858. 

Foole, adj. foolish, C 7539. 

Foon, pi. foes, 5552, C 6940. 

Foote, V. dance formally, 2323. 

Foot-hoot, adv. instantly, 3827. 

For, prep, to prevent, 4229; for fear of, 
2365 ; on account of, 2190. 



Forboden,//. forbidden, C 6616. 

Force, s.; I yeve no force, I care not, 
4602; ^/"/i, necessarily, 1796. 

Fordone,//, undone, 4339. 

Fordrive. pp. scattered, 3782. 

Forewardis, forwards; hennes /., hence- 
forward, C 7304. 

Forfare, v. perish, 5388, 5778. 

For-ofte, adv. very often, 4876. 

For-peyned, pp. distressed, 3693. 

Forsake, v. refuse, 2822 ; withstand, 1876. 

Forstere, s. forester, C 6329. 

Fortened, pp. destroyed, 4875. (Or per- 
haps ' obstructed ' ; cf. A. S. fortyman, to 
shut up.) See Crece. 

Forthenke, v. rue, repent, 3957, 4060. 

Forthy, conj. because; tiot f., not on that 
account, {perhaps) nevertheless, 4509. 

For'wandred, pp. spent with wandering, 

3336. 
Forwardis, s. pi. agreements, C 7303. 
Forwerreyd, pp. utterly defeated, 2564. • 
Forwery, adj. tired out, 3336. 
For-^svhy, wherefore, 1743. 
For^woundid, pp. sorely wounded, 1830. 
Foryet, v. forget, 3243 ; pr. s. C 6538. 
Foryeve, ger. to abandon, give up, 3438. 
Fraunchyse, s. liberty, 4906; nobility, 

2007 ; generosity, 3003 ; Bounty, 3501 ; 

Freedom, C 5865. 
Frere, s. friar, C 7377; Friar Wolf, C 

6424. 
Freres Prechours, s. pi. preaching 

friars, i. e. the Prechours, or Dominican 

friars, C 7458. 
Fret, pp. fretted, adorned, 3204 ; set, 4705. 
Fretted, pp. furnished, lit. ornamented, 

C 7259. 
Frouncen,/r.//. shew wrinkles, C 7261 ; 

Frounced,//, wrinkled, 3137. 
Fyne, v. cease, 1797 ; pr. pi. subj. end, 

depart, 5356. 

G. 

Gabbeth, pr. s. speaks falsely, lies, C 

6700. 
Gabbing, s. lying, C 7602, 7612. 
Gadring, s. accumulation, 5782. 
Garisoun, s. healing, 3248 ; garrison, 4279. 
Garnement, s. dress, 2256. 
Garnisoun, s. fortress, 4204. 
Gate, s. way, wise, 3332, 5167, 5230. 

(Northern). 
Gentilnesse, s. kindness, 4605; good. 

breeding, 2005 ; nobilitv, 5237. 
Gerner, s. garner, C 5988. 
Gesse ; withoute gesse, doubtless, 2817.. 
i Geten, //. gotten, 5701. 



140 



(3\Q&mxml Intitx. 



Geting-, s. obtaining, attainment, 3284. 

Gibbe, Gib (Gilbert), a cat, C 6204. 

Ginne, s. warlike engine, 4176. 

Ginneth,/r. s. begins, 2154. 

Gisarme, s, a weapon bearing a scythe- 
like blade fixed on a shaft and provided 
also with a spear-point like a bayonet, 
C 5978. 

Giterne,^^^. to play on the guitar, 2321, 

Glose, V. flatter, 5097; pp. explained, C 
6890. 

Gloumbe, v. frown, look glum, 4356. 

Gnede, s. stingy person, C 6002. (Mis- 
written grede.) 

Go,//, gone, 2423; empty, C 6834. 

Gonfanoun, s. gonfalon, banner, 2018, 

Gospel Perdurable, The Everlasting 
Gospel, C 7102. 

Graithe, v. dress, array, C 7368. 

Graunt mercy, best thanks, C 7504. 

Gree, (i) s. way (lit. grade) ; in no maner 
gree, in no kind of way, 5743. 

Gree, (2) s. favour ; atte gree, with favour, 
4574 ; take at gree, accept with a good 
will, 1969 ; in gree, in good part, 2306. 

Grete, \pr. s. weep, lament, 4116 (North- 
ern). 

Greves, s.pl. thickets, 3019. 

Groffe, adv. face downward, 2561. 

Groine, pr. s. subj. grumble, murmur, C 
7049. 

Grucchen, pr. pi. subj. grumble at, be- 
grudge, C 6465. 

Grucching, s. refusal, C 6439. 

Grype, v. seize, C 5983. 

Guerdoning-, s. reward, 2380, C 5908. 

Gyler, s. beguiler, 5759. 

Gype, s. frock; perhaps a smock-frock 
(alluding to the numerous gathers in 
the front of it), C 7262. 



H. 

Ha, V. have, 5569. 

Hade, 2//. s. haddest, 2400. 

Halp, //. s. helped, 1911. 

Halt, /;-. s. refi. considers himself, 4901 ; 

keeps, C 7032. 
Hardement, s. courage, 1827, 2487, 3392. 
Harlotes, s.pl. rascals, ribalds, C 6068. 
Harneis, s. armour, gear, C 7477. 
Harneys, v. refl. dress, equip thyself, 

2647. 
Hat. adj. hot, 2398. 

Hatter, adj. comp. hotter, more hotly, 2475. 
Haunt, V. practise, 4868 ; ger. to haunt, 

frequent, C 6601 ; pr. s. subj. practise, C 

7029. 



Haunting-, s. haunt, abode, C 6081. 
Hauteyn, adj. haughty, C 6ioi ; fem. 

3739; 
Havoir, s. having, 4720. 
Haye, s. hedge, 2971, 2987. 
Hele, V. conceal, 2858; ger. 2522; pr.pl. 

C 6882. 
Hele, s. health, 4721. 
Hem, pron. them, 2218. 
Hemmes, s.pl. phylacteries, C 6912. 
Hend, adj. ready, useful, 3345. 
Hente, ger. to seize, 3364; pt. s. 1730, 

4092; //. //. snatched, C 7136; //. 

plucked, C 7644. 
Herber, imp. pi. take up your abode, C 

7586; 2pt. s. didst harbour, 5107. 
Herbergere, s. host, entertainer, C 7585 ; 

//. 5000. 
Herber-we, s. shelter, lodging, C 6201, 

7495- 

Herberwe, v. shelter, lodge, C 6145. 

Herde, s. shepherd, C 6453 ; //. C 6561. 

Herie, /;-. //. honour, praise, C 6241. 
A. S. herian. 

Hertly, adj. true-hearted, 5433. 

Het, //. heated, 3709. 

Heten, v. promise, C 6299. 

Hight, pr. s. is named, C 6341 ; //. pro- 
mised, 2803. 

Hoked, adj. hooked, furnished with 
hooks, 1712; barbed, 1749. 

Hole, adj. whole, complete, 5443. 

Holtes, s.pl. plantations, C 6996. 

Homager, s. vassal, 3288. 

Hoolly, adv. wholly, 1970. 

Hoomly, adj. homely, familiar, C 6320. 

Hoor, adj. gray-haired, C 6335 ; Hore, 
adj. hoary, gray, 3196; //. hoary (a fre- 
quent epithet of trees, perhaps with 
reference to trees of great age), C 6996. 

Hornpypes, s. pi. musical instruments, 
formed of pipes made of horn, 4250. 

Hostilers, s. as adj.pl. keeping an inn, C 

7033- 
Hoteth, pr. s. promises, 5422 ; pr.pl. 5444. 
Housel, V. give the Host (to), C 6438. 
Hulstred, //. concealed, hidden, C 6146. 
Humanitee, s. human nature, 5655. 
Hy, s. haste ; in hy, in haste, 2393, 3591. 

I. 

\ch.,pron. I, C 6787. 

If, conj. if (i. e. if the matter be wisely in- 
quired into) , 4454. 
Imped, //. engrafted, 5137. 
Impes, s. pi. grafts, C 6293. 
Importable, adj. insufferable, C 6902. 



I^omaimt of tfte Eose: Parts B, c. 



141 



In-fere, adv. together, 4827. 
Isse, V. issue, 1992. 

J. 

Jang-leth, pr. s. prattles, C 7540. 
Jang-ling, s. prating, chattering, C 5852; 

//. idle words, C 6711. 
Jape, s. jest, C 7519; pi. tricks, C 6835. 
Jape, I pr. s. mock, scoff at, C 6471. 
Jolily, adv. after a jolly sort, C 7031 ; 

pleasantly, 2248; nicely, neatly, 2284; 

deservedly, C 7664. 
Joly, adj. fine, gay, C 7248. 
Jolynesse, s. jolliness, joy, 2302. 
Jcweles, s.p/. jewels, 2092, 5420. 
Joyne, i pr. s. enjoin, 2355. 
Jupartye, s. jeopardy, 2666. 

K. 

Kembe, imp. s. comb, 2284. 

Kenne, v. show, teach, 2476. 

Kepe, s. heed, 3475. 

Kepe, V. keep; ^epe forth, perpetuate, 

4854; I pr. s. care, C 6440; keep, 3476; 

care, wish, C 6083 ; pr. pi. care, C 6093. 
Kernels, s. pi. battlements, 4195. F. text, 

les creniaus. 
Kerving, pres.pt. as adj. cutting, 3813. 
Kesse, v. kiss, 2006. 

Kid, //. made known, 2172 ; evident, 3132. 
Kirked, adj. crooked (?), 3137. 
Knet, pp. knit, fastened, 4700, 4811; //. 

//. fast bound, 2092. 
Knewe, i //. s. subj. disclosed, C 6090. 
Knopped, //. fastened, C 7260. A knoppe 

is properly a button ; hence knoppett, to 

fasten with a button. 



L. 

Laas, s. toils, snare, C 6029, 6648 ; Lace, 
cord, string, C 7373; net, 2792; snare, 

5093. 
Laced, pp. entangled, caught, 3178. 
Lakke, 2 pr.pl. blame, 4804. 
Lambren, s.pl. lambs, C 7013. 
Largesse, 5. liberality, 2354; C 5853. 
Las, s. net, 2790. See Laas, Lace. 
Late, ger. to let, permit, allow, 3145, C 

6676 ; v. let, 5574 ; Lat. pr. s. lets remain, 

5493- 
Lauhwith, pr. s. laughs, 2294. 
Lay, s. law, religious belief, C 6749, 
Leef, adj. willing, 2335. 
Lees, s. pi. lies ; withotiten lees, truly, 

3904, 5728. 



Leful, adj. allowable, permissible, 5195- 

Lit. ' leave-ful.' 
Leggen, ger. ease, relieve, 5016. (Short 

for aleggen.) 
Letnes, s.pl. rays, 5346. 
Lemman, s. sweetheart, C 6056, 6305. 
Lene, v. lend, 3053, C 7026. 
Lening; in lenif/g, as a loan, 2373. 
Lepand, pres. part, running (with shon 

jumps), 1928. 
Lere, ger. to teach, 2143, 2149; v. teach, 

5152; learn, 2451, 4808. 
Lered, adj. learned, C 6217. 
Lese, V. lose, C 5915, 5924; pr. s. 2149. 
Lesing, s. lie, falsehood, 2174, 4835. 
Let,/r. s. leads (his life), C 6111. 
Lete, V. cease, 2463 ; leave, C 6457 ; let 

alone, C 6556; abandon, C 6169; allow, 

permit, 6458 ; i pr. s. leave, C 6354 ; 

abandon, C 6997 ; //. let, 1791. 
Lette, s. let, hindrance, 3756. 
Letten, v. hinder, 3590; delay, 3940; 

stop, 1832; cease, 2807; desist, 1832. 
Letting, s. hindrance, C 5931. 
Lettrure, s. literature, writing, C 6751., 
Leve, V. believe, 3303. 
Leve, V. live, 2336. 
Lever, adv. rather, C 6793 '< '''^ were lever, 

I had rather, C 6168. 
Lewd, adj. lay (folk), the ignorant, C 

6217. 
Lewedist, adj. super I. most ignorant, 

4802. 
IjeyQ, pt. pi. lay, lived, C 6572. 
Liche, adv. alike, equally, 4160. 
Ligging, //-. j?>/. lying down, 4002. 
Likerous, adj. licentious, 4264. 
Likly, adj. similar, 4852. 
Lisse, V. abate, 4128 ; ger. to be eased, to 

feel relief, 3758. 
List, s. pleasure, will, 1957. 
List,/r. s. wishes, C 6139. 
Loigne, s. tether, 3382, C 7050. 
Loke, //, locked up, 2092. 
Long; of long passed, oi old, 2277- 
Longith,/r. s. befits, 2321. 
Loos, s. renown, reputation, 2310, C 6103 ; 

ill fame, C 7081. 
Lorn,//, lost, 4327, 4502, 4508, C 5973. 
Losengeours, s.pl. deceivers, 2693. 
Loteby, s. paramour, C 6339. 
Lough,//, s. laughed, C 7295. 
Loure, pr. s. subJ. scowl, C 7049. 
Loute, V. bow, 4384; bow down, C 7336; 

pr.pl. subJ. bow down, C 6917. 
Lo"w^e, ger. to appraise, i. e. to be valued 

at. 4532. 
Luce, s. pike (fish), C 7039. 



142 



(glflssarial 3IntJ£X. 



Lyflode, s. livelihood, 5602, C 6663. 

Lyken, v. please, 1854, C 6131. 

Lyte, adj. little, small, 2279, 3557; adv. C 

7551- 
Lythe, adj. delicate, 3762. 

M. 

Maat, adj. bewildered, overcome, 1739. 

See Mate. 
Maistryse, s. strength, dominion, 4172. 
Make, ^er. to cause, C 5931 ; p/: pi, pro- 
pound, C 6186. 
Male, s. bag, wallet, 3263 ; money-bag, C 

6376. 
Maltalent, s. ill-humour, 3438. 
Mangonel, s. a military engine on the 

principle of the sling-staff for casting 

stones, a catapult, C 6279, 
Mar, adj. greater, 2215 ; adv. more, 1854. 
Marchandise, s. barter, C 5902. 
Mare, adv. more, 2709. 
Markes,//. marks (coins), C 5986. 
Marreth, pr. 5. disfigures, 4679. 
Mate, adj. distracted, 5099 ; downcast, 

4671; dispirited, 3167,3190. See Maat. 
Maugree, s. ill-will, 4399 ; reproach, 3144 ; 

prep, in spite of, C 671 1 ; maiigre youres, 

in spite of you, C 7645. 
Mayme, v. maim, C 6620; pr. s. wounds, 

5317. See Meygned. 
Maysondewe, s. hospital, 5619. 
Medle, v. interfere, 3788 ; Medle, v. refl,. 

meddle; m. him of, deal with, C 6050; 

to medle, for meddling, 4545. 
Meke, v. mollify, 3394 ; have mercy, 3541 ; 

Meked, pt. s. rejl. humbled himself, 3584. 
Mendience, s. beggary, mendicancy, C 

6657, 6707. 
Mene, s. mean, middle state, C 6527. 
Mene, adj. middle, mean, 4844. 
Mene. i pr. s. bemoan, 2596. 
Menour, Minorite, Franciscan friar, C 

6338. 

Mes, s. at good vies, at a favourable op- 
portunity, 3462. O. F. vies. 

Mete, adj. meet, fitted, 1799. 

Mete, v. meet, succeed, 4571. 

Mevable, adj. moveable, 4736. 

Meve, V. move, incite, 2327. 

Me we, s. coop, cage (a falconry term), 
4778. 

Meyg-ned, //. hurt, maimed, 3356. See 
Mayme. 

Meynee, s. household, C 6870, 7156. 

Meynt, pp. mingled, 1920; Meynd, 2296. 

Mich. adj. many, 2258, 5555. 

Micher, s. thief, C 6541. 



Miches, s. pi. small loaves of finest 
wheaten flour, 5585. 

Mis, adj. amiss, wrong, 3243. 

Mischeef, s. misfortune, C 6731. 

Misericorde, s. mercy, 3577. 

Misseying, s. evil-speaking, 2207. 

Mister, s. occupation, trade, C 6976; 
whatever mister, of every kind of occu- 
pation, C 6332. 

Mistere, s. need, C 7409. 

Miswey, adv. astray, 4764. 

Mixens, s. pi. dunghills, C 6496. 

Mo, adj. pi. others besides, 3023 ; more 
(in number), C 5990. 

Mochel, adj. great, 31 17 ; to m., too much, 
3442. 

Moetole, s. moveable property, C 6045. 

Moeve, v. move, i. e. prefer, make, C 6039. 

Moneste, i pr. s. admonish, charge, 3579. 

Monyours, s. pi. coiners, C 6811. 

Mot,/;-, s. must, 3784; so mote I go, as I 
hope to walk about, C 6591. 

Mowe, v. be able, 2644. 

Musard, s. muser, dreamer, C 7562 ; slug- 
gard, 3256, 4034 ; dolt, C 7562. 

Muwis, s.pl. bushels, 5590. 

N. 

Nathelesse, nevertheless, C 6195. 
Ne, conj. unless, 4858. 
Nede. adv. necessarily, C 7633. 
Nedely, adv. needs must, C 61 17. 
Neden, v. be necessary, C 5990. 
Nedes, s. pi. necessities, C 6174. 
Nedes, adv. of necessity, 1792. 
Neer. adv. nearer, 1708. See Nerre. 
Neigh it nere, v. approach it more 

nearly, 2003. 
Nempned, //>. named, mentioned, C 6224, 
Nere, were not, were it not for, 2778; 

were there not, 2778 ; had it not been 

for, C 7328. 
Nerre, adj. co7np. nearer, 5101. 
Neven, v. name, C 5962 ; recount, C 7071. 
Nil,//-, s. will not, C 5821, 6045. 
Nomen, //. //. took, C 7423 ; pp. taken, 

5404- 

Noncerteyne, adj. uncertain, 5426. 

Nones, for the, for the nonce, occasion- 
ally, C 7387. 

Nonne, s. nun, C 6350. 

Noot, I pr. s. know not, C 6367. 

Noriture, s. bringing up, C 6728. 

Norys, s. nurse, 5418. 

Not, I pr. s. know not, 5191. 

Note-kernel, s. nut-kernel, C 7117. 

Noye, s. hurt, 3772. 



2aamaunt oi tfie Eo0e: ^^arts b, c. 



143 



Noyen, ^er. to vex, 4416. 

Noyous, adj. harmful, 3230, 4449. 

Noyse, s. evil report, 3971. 

Nyce, aJj. foolish,silly, 4262, 4877, C 6944. 

Nycetee, s. foolishness, 5525. 

Nyghe, v. approach, 1775. 

O. 

Obeysshing-, s. submission, 3380. 

Of, prep, out of, owing to, 3981 ; con- 
cerning (Lat. de), 4884; off, 5470; 
(some) of, (part) of, 1993. Or it may 
mean ' by,' ' on account of.' 

Offense, s. discomfort, 5677. 

Of-newe, adv. newly, afresh, 5169. 

Onlofte, prep, aloft, on high, 5503. 

Oon, adj. one, 4812; in oou, without 
change, 3779. 

Ostages, s. p/. hostages, 2064, C 7311. 

Other-gate, adv. otherwise, 2158. 

Ought, adv. in any way, C 6096. 

OutaJ^G, prep, except, 4474. 

Outerly, adu. wholly, utterly, 3489, 3742. 

Outrage, s. wrong, 2082, 2086; scanda- 
lous life, 4927; outrageous deeds, C 
6024 (mistranslated). 

Outrageous, adj. exceeding great, 2602 ; 
ill-behaved, 2192. 

Outslinge, v. fling out, C 5987. 

Out-take, //■^/'. except, C 5819. 

Over-al, adv. everywhere, 3050, 3914. 

Overgo, V. pass away, 3784; pr.pl. tram- 
ple on, C 6821. 

Overwhelme, v. roll over, 3775. 

Ow, I pr. s. ought, 4413. 



Palasyns, adj. pi. belonging to the 
palace ; ladyes palasyns, court ladies, C 
6862. 

Papelard, s. hypocrite, deceiver, C 7283. 

Papelardye, s. hypocrisy, C 6796. 

Parage, s. parentage, descent, 4759. 

Par-amour, with devotion, 2830. 

Paramour, s. paramour, lover, 5060. 

Paramours, adv.\\i\\h. a lover's affection, 

4657- 
Parceners, s. pi. partners, C 6952. 
Parcuere, adv. by heart, 4796, 
Pardee, V. pardieu, 4433, C 5913. 
Parfay, by my faith, C 6058. 
Part, .9. duty, 5032. 
Parte, v. divide, 5283. 
Party, s. part ; in party, partially, 5338. 
Parvys, s. room over a church-porch, 

C 7108. 



Pas ; a pas, apace, quickly, 3724. 
Passaunt, adj. surpassing, 31 10. 
Passe, V. penetrate, 175 1. 
Patre, v. recite the paternoster, C 6794. 
Pay, s. satisfaction, C 5938; liking, taste, 
1721 ; 7ne to pay, to my satisfaction, C 

6985. 

'Pa,ye,^er. to appease, 3599. 

Peire, v. damage, C 6103. 

Peire of bedis, s. rosary, C 7372. 

Pens, s.pl. pence, C 5987. 

Pensel, s. a standard, ensign, or banner, 
(particularly of bachelors-in-arms), a 
pennoncel, C 6280. 

Pepir, s. pepper, (metaphorically) mis- 
chief, C 6028. 

Pei'auntre, adv. peradventure, 5192. 

Percas, adv. perchance, C 6647. 

Persaunt, adj. piercing, 2809; sharp, 
4179. 

Pese, ^'er. to appease, 3397. 

Pesible, adj. peaceable, gentle, C 7413. 

Peyne, s. penalty, C 6626; pain, hard- 
ness, 2120; up peyne, on pain (of death), 
C 6617. 

Peyne, v. rejl. endeavour, C 7512; pr. s. 
reji. takes pains, C 6014. 

Piment, s. spiced wine or ale, C 6027. 

Pitous, adj. excusable, deserving pity, 
4734; merciful, C 6161. 

Plat, adv. flat, flatly, 1734, C 7526. 

Pleyne, v. lament, complain, 2299, C 6405. 

Pleynt, s. complaint, C 6012. 

Plight, /A s. plucked, 1745. 

Plongeth./r. s. plunges, 5472. 

Plyte, s. affair, C 5827. 

Poeste, s. power, virtue, 2095. 

Pole, s. pool, C 5966. 

Port, s. demeanour, manner, 2038, 2192; 
Porte, 4622. 

Porte-colys, s. portcullis, 4168. 

Possed, pp. pushed, tossed, 4479; pp. 
driven, 4625. 

Potente. s. crutch, C 7417. 

Poustee, s. power, influence, C 6533, 
6957, 7679 ; dominion, C 6484. 

Povert, s. poverty, C 618 1. 

Prece, ^er. to press, 4198. 

Predicacioun, s. preaching, 5763. 

Preise, 1 pr. s. value, appraise, 4830. 

Prese, v. press ; pr. s. intrudes, C 7627 ; 
pr. pi. intrude, C 7629; ifnp. s. endea- 
vour, 2899. 

Pressure, s. wine-press, 3692. 

Preve, v. prove, 4170. 

Preving, s. proof, C 7543. 

Preyse, i pr. s. value, esteem, 1983. F. 
pris. 



144 



(^lassarial Untjei. 



Prike, imp. s. gallop, 2314. 

Pris, s. esteem, 2310. 

Privetee, s. secret, 5526, C 6878, 6882. 

Procuratour, s. a collector of alms for 

hospitals or sick persons, C 6974. 
Propre, adj. own, C 6565, 6592. 
Provable, adj. capable of proof, 5414. 
Provende, s. allowance, stipend, C 6931. 
Prow, s. profit, gain, 5806, 1940. 
Pryme temps, first beginning, 4534 ; the 

spring, 4747. 
Prys, s. praise, 1972; price, C 5927. 
PiigTiaunt, adj. poignant, keen, 1879, 
Pullaille, s. poultry, C 7043. 
Pulle, V. pluck, strip, C 5984; pr. pi. 

flay, strip, C 6820. 
Puple, s. people, rabblement, C 7159. 
Purchas, s. acquisition, C 6838. 
Purchaser!, ger. to procure, C 6607. 
Purpryse, s. park, enclosure, 3987, 4171. 
Purveaunce, s. provision, C 7326. 
Purvey e, ger. to procure, 3339. 
Put pr. s. puts, 3556, 4444, C 5949. 
Pyne, s. endeavour, 1798 ; misery, C 

6499. 
Pynen, v. torment, punish, 351 1. 

Q. 

Quarels, s. pi. square-headed crossbow- 
bolts, 1823. 

Quarteyne, adj. as s. quartan fever or 
ague, 2401. 

Queme.^^/-. to please, C 7270. 

Quenche, v. be quenched, 5324. 

Quene, s. quean, concubine, C 7032. 

Querrour, s. quarry-man, hewer of stone, 

4140- 

Quethe ; / quethe him guyte, I cry him 
quit, C 6999. 

Queynt, adj. elegant, 2251 ; curious, 
fanciful, C 6342; strange, 5199; pleased, 
3079; shewing satisfaction, 2038. 

Queyntly. adv. neatly, easily, 4322. 

Queyntyse, s. elegance, 2250. 

Quik. adj. alive, 3523, 4070, 5056. 

Quitly, adv. quite, entirely, C 5843. 

Quitte, pt. s. rejlex.; quitte him, ac- 
quitted himself, 3069; //. requited, 
3146, 6088; made amends for, 2599; 
rid, 1852. 

Quook, I pt. s. quaked, 3163; pi. pi. 
3966. 

Quyte, pp. as adj. quit, C 5904; free, C 
5910; entire, 2375. 

Quyte, V. acquit, release, C 6032; fulfil, 
5032; xpr. s, C 6412; imp. s. 2222, 4392. 



R. 

Racyne, s. root, 4881. 

Rage, s. rage, spite, 3809; malignity, 

venom, 1916; madness, 3292; in r., 

mad, 4523. 
Ramage, adj. wild, 5384. O. F. rainage. 
Rape, s. haste, 1929. 
Rape, adv. quickly, C 6516. 
Rathe , adj. early, C 6650. 
Ravisable, adj. greedy for prey, C 7016. 
Ravyne, s. plunder, C 6813. 
Rebel, adj. rebellious, C 6400. 
Recche ; zvhat recchith ?;/<', what care I, 

3447- 

Recreaundyse, s. cowardice, 2107, 4038. 

Recreaunte, s. coward, 4090. 

Recured, pp. recovered, 4920, 5124. 

Rede, s. good advice, 3859 ; Reed, C 7328. 

Rede, 1 pr. s. advise, 1932; read, 1819. 

Reed. s. advice, C 7328 ; Rede, 3859. 

Refreyne, ger. to bridle, C 7511. 

Reft, s. rift, 2661. 

Refte, 1 pt.pl. deprived, 3562. 

Refuyt, s. refuge, escape, 3840. 

Rehete, v. cheer, console, C 6509. 

Reisins, s.pl. fresh grapes, 3659. 

Relees, s. relief, 2612; release, 4440. 

Relesse. \pr. s. give up, C 6999. 

Religioun, s. religious order, 3715; mo- 
nastic life, C 6155. 

Religious, adj. pious, C 6236; as s. a 
nun, C 6347 ; R. folk, monastics, C 
6149. 

Remued, pt. s. moved, C 7432. 

Rendre, v. recite, 4800. 

Reneyed, i //. s. subj. should renounce, 
C 6787. 

Repeire, v. return, 3573, 4 131. 

Repreef, j-. reproach, 4974, C 7240. 

Repreve, s. reproach, 5261 ; Reprove, 
upbraiding, 5525. , 

Requere, pr. s. subj. request, ask, 5233; 
pp. asked, 5277. 

Rescous. s. service, endeavour to sup- 
port, C 6749. 

Resonables, adj.pl. reasonable, C 6760. 

Resoun, s. correct manner, 2151. 

Reveth, pr. s. takes away, C 6254 ; //. s. 
bereaved, 4351. 

Reverte. v. bring back, C 7188. 

Revolucioun, s. revolution, turn (of for- 
tune's wheel), 4366. 

Re^ward, s. regard, consideration, 3832. 

Re'we, V. rue, be sorry, 4060; /'/ wol me 
rewe, I shall be sorry, 5170. 

Reyne, v. rain down, fell as rain, 1822. 

Reynes, Rennes (in Brittany), 3826. 



Eomaunt of tfje ^o^z: Parts B, c. 



45 



Ribaned, />/), adorned with lace (of gold), 

4752. 
Ribaud, s. labourer, 5673 ; />/. ribalds, C 

7302. 
Ribaudye, s. ribaldry, 2224; riotous 

living, 4926. 
Right, adv. just, exactly, 5347 ; quite, C 

6398, 6411 ; right /tought, not at all, 2071, 
Rimpled, adj. wrinkled, 4495. 
Riveling", pres. part, puckering, C 7262. 
Rochet, s. linen garment, 4754. 
Rode, s. dat. rood, cross, C 6564. 
Rody, adj. ruddy, 3629. 
Roig-nous, adj. scurvy, rotten, C 6190. 
Roking', pres. part, rocking, quivering, 

trembling, 1906. Cf. Shak. Lucr. 262. 
Ronne, pp. advanced, 4495. 
Roser, s. rose-bush, 1789, 1826, 1833, 2967. 
Rought, I //. s. recked, heeded, 1873 ; 

x pt. s. subj. should not care, C 7061. 
Rowe, adj.pl. rough, 1838. 
Rude, adj. as pi. s. common people, 2268. 
Ry ve, V. pierce, C 7161 ; be torn, 5393 ; 

Ryveth,//-. s. is torn, 5718. 



Sad. adj. serious, staid, composed, 4627 ; 

pi. grievous, C 6907. 
Sadnesse, s. sobriety, discretion, 4940. 
Sailen, v. assail, C 7338. 
Sakked Freres, Fratres de Sacco, Friars 

of the Sack, C 7462. 
Salowe, adj. sallow ; but read falowe, i. e. 

fallow, C 7392. 
Salue,^^;-. to salute, 2218 ; pr. s. subj. 2220. 
Saraons, s. pi. salmon, C 7039. 
Sat.^A s. impers. suited, 3810. 
Sautere, s. psalter, C 7371. 
Say, 1 pf. s. saw, 1722; Sawe, //. s. subj. 

saw, 17 19. 
Say {for Assay), v. essay, attempt, en- 
deavour, 5162. 
Saynt, adj. girded, girdled (?), C 7408, 
Scantilone, s. pattern, C 7064. 
Scole, s. scholarship, learning, 3274. 
Score, s. crack (or hole) in a wall, 2660. 
Scrippe, s. scrip, wallet, C 7405. 
Secree, adj. secret, 5257. 
Secree, s. secret, 5260. 
Secte, s. class, category, 5745; gen. of 

(our) race, 4859. 
Seden, v. bear seed, fructify, 4344. 
See, pr. s. subj. see; so god 7ne see, as 

( I hope) God may protect me, 5693. 
Seer. adj. sere, dry, 4749. 
Seignorye, s. dominion, 3213. 
Seke, adj. sick, 5729, 5733 ; pi. 4829. 



Semblable, adj. similar, C 591 1. 
Semblable, adj. as s. resemblance, one 

like himself, 4855; pi. like (cases), C 

6759- 
Semblant, s. appearance, disguise, C 

6202; (his) hypocrisy, C 7449; seeming, 

3205, 3957. 
Sen, CO//J. since, 1984. 
Sentence, s. meaning, C 7474; //. opi- 
nions, C 5813. 
Sermoneth,//-. s. sermonizes, preaches, 

C 6219. 
Servage. j. servitude, 4382, 5807. 
Serviable, adj. serviceable, C 6004. 
Sette, z/. fasten (an accusation), 3328 ; Set, 

pr. s. places, 4925. 4957 ; pt. pi. besieged, 

C 7344; pp. established, 2077. 
Seure, adj. sure, 4304. 
Seurere, adj. comp. surer, more secure, C 

5958. 
Seynt Amour, William St. Amour, C 

6781. (He wrote against the friars who 

advocated the Eternal Gospel.) 
Shende, v. shame, put to shame, 31 16; 

ger. to injure, 2953 ; pr. s. ruins, 4776, 

5310; pp. disgraced, ruined, 3479, 3933. 
Shene, adj. fair, 3713. 
Shere, pr. s. subj. can cut, shear, 4335 ; 

may shave, C 6196. 
Shete, ger. to shoot, 1798; Shet, pt. s. 

shot, 1727, 1777. 
Shette, ger. to shut, 4224; v. shut up, 

2091 ; //-. pi. shut up, 5771 ; Shet, pp. 

shut. 4368. 
Shewing", s. demeanour, 4041. 
Shitteth, /;•. s. shuts, 4100; Shit,//, shut 

up, 2767. 
Shoon, s. pi. shoes, 2265. 
Shrewis, s.pl. knaves, C 6876. 
Shrift-fader, s. confessor, C 6423, 
Shryve, v. hear confessions, C 6364. 
Sig-h, I //. s. saw, 1822. 
Sig-ht, I pt. s. sighed, 1746. 
Sikerer, adj. comp. safer, C 7310. 
Sikerest. adj. superl. securest, C 6147. 
Sikernesse, s. certainty, 1935, 2365. 
Sikirly, adv. certainly, C 6906, 
Similacioun, s. dissimulation, C 7230. 
Simplesse, s. Simplicity (the name of an 

arrow), 1774; simplicity, C 6381. 
Sire, s. father; sire ne dame, neither 

father nor mother, C 5887. 
Sith, cojij. since, 1964, 4367, C 6266. 
Sithen, adv. afterwards, 1999, C 7130, 
Sitte, pr. pi. subj. sit, fit, 2267; Sittand, 
pres.pt. (Northern) fitting, 2263; Sitting, 
pres. pt. fitting, suitable, 3654 ; befitting, 

2309, 4675. 



F3 



146 



0lo&mxiKl lEntiex. 



Skaffaut, s. scaffold, a shed on wheels 

with a ridged roof, under cover of 

which the battering ram was used, 

4176. 
Skile, s. reason, 3120, 4543; avail, 1951. 
Slake, V. abate, 3108. 
Sleen, ^er. to slay, C 7195 ; ^f'. s. 2590. 
Sleighe, ad/, sly, cunning, C 7257. 
Sleightes, J-.//, missiles, C 7071; tricks, 

C 6371. 
Slo, V. slay, 3150, 4592 ; ^er. 5521 ; Sloo, v. 

1953. 3523 ; Slo, jz)r. s. subj. 4992, 5643. 
Slomrest, ipr. s. slumberest, 2567. 
Slo"we, s. moth, 4751. F. taigne. 
Snaete,//, smitten, 3755. 
Snibbe, v. snub, reproach, 4533. 
Sojour, s. sojourn, 4282; dwelling, 5150. 
Solempnely, adv. publicly, with due 

publicity, C 6766. 
Soleyn, adj. sullen, 3896. 
Sophyme, s. sophism, C 7471. 
Sore, adv. closely, strictly, 2055 ; ardently, 

2075. 
Sote, adj. sweet, 4880. 
Soth-sawe, s. truth-telling, C 6125, 6130, 

7590. 
Sotilly. adv. subtly, 4395. 
Soudiours, s.pl. soldiers, 4234. 
Spanishing', s. expanding, expansion, 

3633. O. F. espanir, to expand. 
Sparred,//, s. locked, fastened, 3320. 
Sparth, s. a battle-ax, C 5978. 
Spered,//. {for sperred) , fastened, locked 

(F. senti la clef), 2099. 
Sperhauke, s. sparrowhawk, 4033. 
Spille, V. kill, 1953; destroy, 2162 ; ger.Xo 

surrender to destruction, 5441 ; pt. s. 

spoiled, 5136; pp. exhausted, 4786. 
Spitel, s. hospital, C 6505. 
Springe,/'/'.//, grow, increase, C 5988; 

pp. advanced, C 6954. 
Spring-oldes, s. pi. catapults, 4191. 
Squared, pp. cut square, 4155. 
Squierly, adj. like a squire, C 7415. 
Squyre, s. square (carpenter's square), C 

7064. 
Stant, pr. s. stands, waits, 5004. 
Stark, adj. downright, C 7292. 
Stede, s. place, C 5898. 
Stille or loude, silently or aloud, under 

all circumstances, C 7532. 
Stinten, v. cease, C 6849; //. stopped, C 

6473- 
Stonde forth, ger. to stand out, persist, 

3547 ; Stont, /r. s. stands, consists, 5581 ; 

Stant, pr. s. waits, 5004. 
Stounde, s. hour, time, 1733 ; pi. hours, 

2639. 



Stounde, s. (probably an error for 
ivoiiiide, wound), 4472. 

Stoundemele, adj. momentary, 3784.- 

Stoundemele, adv. hourly, from one 
hour to another, 2304. 

Stoutnesse, s. pride, obstinacy, 1936. 

Streite, adj. close-fitting, 2271. 

Strene, s. strain, breed, 4859. A. S. 
streoua. 

Strepe, v. strip, fleece, C 6818. 

Streyne, v. constrain, compel, C 6406; 
pt. s. urged, C 7631. 

Streyned-Abstinence, Constrained Ab- 
stinence, C 7325. 

Stuffen, pr. pi. provide with defenders, 
C 6290. F. text, corent les niurs garnir. 

Suen, V. pursue, seek, 4953. 

Suffraunce, s. patience, submission, 3463. 

Suspecious, adj. suspect, open to sus- 
picion, C 6110. 

Sustening, s. sustenance, C 6697. 

Swelte, 2/r. s. subj. die, 2480. 

Swete, 2 pr. s. subj. sweat, feel heat, 
2480. 

Swink, s. toil, labour, C 6596. 

Swinke, v. labour, C 6619; ger. to toil, 
215 1, 5685 ; pr. s. toils, 5675. 

Swinker, s. toiler, C 6857. 

Swinking-, s. toiling, C 6703. 

S'woning', s. swooning, swoon, 1737. 

Sy, i. e. if (F. si), i. e. haphazard, 5741. 

Sythes, //. times, 2048, 4868 ; Many sythe, 
often, 2257. 

T. 

Take, v. lay hold, 5351 ; take arms, 3529; 

hand over, C 7265 ; v. refl.. surrender, 

1947 ; /. 071 hem, apply to themselves, C 

6107 (F.text, sur eus riens n'efi prendront) ; 

pr. s. betakes, commits himself, C 6442 ; 

pp. taken ; hhn lake, betaken himself, 

C 7280; Tan, pp. C 5894. 
Takel, s. weapon, arrow, 1729, 1863. 
Tale, s. reckoning ; yeve I Utel tale, I 

pay little heed, C 6375. 
Talent, s. good will, inclination, C 6134; 

fancy, C 7110; longing, 3472; desire, 

intent, 1716; spirit, disposition, C 7674. 
Tan,//, taken, C 5894. See Take. 
Tapinage, s. hiding; 171 tapiTiage, sneak- 

ingly, C 7363. 
Tatafwagges, s. pi. fluttering tatters, C 

7259. 
Taylagiers, s. pi. tax-gatherers, C 681 1. 
Tecche, s. fault, bad habit, 5166; //. C 

6517- 
Teched, //. s. taught, C 6680. 
Telle, V. account, 5053. 



'i^omaunt of i\)z l^ose : Parts B, c. 



147 



Templers, 5. //. Knights-Templars, C 
6693. 

Temprure, s. tempering, mixing, 4177. 

Temps, s. time ; at ptlme temps, at the 
first time, at first, 3373. 

Tene, s. ruin, blight, 4750. 

Tespye, v. to espy, 3156. 

Than, conj. than if, 4328. 

Thank, s. thanks, 4584; (F. text, so7i gre 
deservir) ; good will, 2698, 2700 ; in thank, 
with thanks, with good will, 2115,4577; 
Thankes, //. thanks, 2036; thy thatikis, 
with thy good will, 2463. 

Thar, adv. there, 1853, 1857. 

Thar, pr. s. impers. needs ; you thar, you 
need, 3604. 

Thee, v. thrive; so mote I thee, as I hope 
to thrive, 3086, 4841, C 5899. 

Thempryse (for The empryse), the cus- 
tom, 2286. 

Ther-geyn, prep, against this, C 6555. 

Thilke,/;-^«. that, 2106, C 5980. 

Thing", s. pi. things, property, C 6670. 

Thinges, s. pi. business, doings, C 6037. 

This, for this is, C 6057, 6452. 

Thought, s. the object of thought per- 
sonified (?), 2473. (But a corrupt read- 
ing; read That sivete, answering to 
S'amie in the F. text.) 

Threste, 1 pr. s. thrust, C 6825. 

Thringe, ger. to thrust, C 7419. 

Thritty, adj. thirty, 421 1. 

Throwe, s. moment, 1771, 3867. 

Thrust, s. thirst, 4722. 

Thurgh-sought, pp. examined thor- 
oughly, 4948. 

Til, prep, to ; him til, to him, 4594. 

Tilier, s. tiller, husbandman, 4339. 

To-heten, pp. belaboured, C 6126. 

Tobeye, to obey, 3534. 

To-dvawe, pp. torn in pieces, C 6126, 

Toforn, prep, before, 2969; God toforn, 
in the sight of God, C 7198. 

Token, pt. pi. took (i. e. took Christ to 
witness, appealed to Christ), C 7122. 
(The translation is entirely wrong ; 
hence the lack of sense.) 

Tolde. pp. {error for Told), told, C 6598. 

To-me-ward, towards me, 3354, 3803. 

To-moche-Yeving, Giving too much, C 

5837- 
Ton, the, the one, 5217; the toon, 5559. 
To-quake, z^. quake greatly; alto-quake, 

tremble very much, 2527. 
To-shake, v. shake to the foundations, 

ruin, C 5981. 
To-shar, pt. s. lacerated, cut in twain, 

1858. 



To-shent, pp. undone ; al to-shent, utterly 

undone, 1903. 
Touret, s. turret, 4164. 
Tourn, s. turn, 5470. 
Trace, v. walk, go about, C 6745 ; pr.pl. 

walk, live, 5753. 
Transmewe, v. transmute, be changed, 

2526. 
Trasshed,//. betraved, 3231. 
Trechour, s. traitour, C 7216 ; cheat, C 

6602. 
Tree, s. wood, 1747, 1808, 2408, C 7061. 
Treget, s. trap, snare, C 6312; trickery, 

guile, C 6267, 6825. 
Tregetours, s.pl. tricksters, C 7587. 
Tregetrye, J-. trickery, C 6382; trick, C 

6374- 
Trepeget, s. a military engine made of 

wood, used for hurling large stones and 

other missiles, a trebuchet, C 6279. 
Trichour, adj. treacherous, 6308. 
Trist, V. trust, 4364 ; pp. 3929. 
Trouble, adj. troubled, 1755. 
Troubler, adj. comp. dimmer, less bright, 

C 7116. 
Trowandyse, s. knavery, villany, 3954. 
Trowe, v. believe, C 6873. 
Truaunding-, s. idling, shirking, C 6721. 
Truaundyse, s. idleness, shirking, C 6664. 
Truaunt, J-. idler, loafer, C 6645. 
Tumble, v. cause to tumble, cause to 

perform athletic feats, C 6836; ger. to 

tumble, 5469. 
Turves, s.pl. sods of turf, C 7062. 
Twinne, v. separate, go apart, 4813 ; part, 

5077; depart, 4367. 

U. 

Unavysed, adj. heedless, indiscreet, 
foolish, 4739. 

Unbond, pt. s. released, C 6416 ; pp. un- 
fastened, 4700; opened, 2226. 

Unclosed, pp. untied, unfastened, 4698. 

Unclosid, //i. unenclosed, 3921, 3925. 

Undirfongith, pr. s. undertakes, 5709. 

Unese, s. uneasiness, trouble, 3102; dis- 
comfort, 2596. 

Unhappe, s. mishap, ill fortune, 5492. 

Unhyde, v. unfold, reveal, 2168. 

Unlefulle, adj. illicit, 4880. 

Unnethe, adv. scarcely, i. e. it will 
scarcely be, C 6541 ; Unnethis, hardly, 
5461. 

Unrelesed, adj. unrelieved, 2729. 

Unsperd, pp. unbolted, unbarred, 2656. 

Unthrift, s. wastefulness, 4926. 

Unwelde, adj. impotent, feeble, 4886. 



148 



(f^loggarial Intjex. 



Up-caste, pt. s. lifted up, C 7129. 
Updresse, v. set up, prepare, C 7067. 
Up-right, adv. on thy back, 2561. 
Urchouns, s. pi. hedgehogs, 3135. 
Utter, adj. outer, 4208. 



Vailith, pr. s. avails, 5765. 
Valour, s. worth, 5236, 5556; value, 5538. 
Vassalage, s. prowess, courage, C 5871. 
Vekke, s. old woman, hag, 4286, 4495. 
Vendable, adj. venal, vendible, saleable, 

5804. 
Verger, s. orchard, 3234, 3618, 3831, 3851. 
Vermayle, adj. vermilion, scarlet-red, 

3645. 

Vilaynsly, adv. disgracefully, 3994. 

Vileyn, s. peasant, yokel, churl, 1990; 
Vilayns,^<?«. churl's, 1992. 

Vitaille, s. victuals, delicacies, C 7044. 

Voide, V. drive away, 5164 ; pr. s, removes, 
2833, 2845 ; imp. s. remove, clear, 2283 ; 
hfip. pi. put away, 3571. 

Voluntee, s. will, desire, 5276. 

Vouche, //-. s. I per. vouchsafe ; For sauf 
of cherlis I ne vouche, for I do not 
vouchsafe, among churls, 2002. (Or 
read to for of?) 

Vounde, jz5/. (?) well found, hence, excel- 
lent, C 7063. 

W. 

Wacche, j. watching, lying awake, 4132. 
Wade. V. wade, go about, 5022. 
Walkyng, s. walking (?) , 2682. (Perhaps 

rGd.6. talking ; F. text, parlers.) 
Walowe, V. toss (or roll) about, 2562. 
Wanhope, s. despair, 4432, 4433, 4708. 
Wante, v. be lacking, 2530. 
Ware, s. commodity, C 5926. 
Warne, v. inform, C 7657 ; pt. s. refused, 

C 5840 ; pp. refused, denied, 2604, 3426, 

5245. C 7502. 
Wawe, s. wave, 4712. 
Wayte, ger. to beset (me) with, to plot, 

3938. 
Weder, s. storm, 4336. 
Weed, s. religious habit, C 6359. 
Welfaring-, adj. well-favoured, C 6866. 

F. text, deles. 
Wel-Helinge, s. Good-concealment, C 

5857. 
Wene, s. expectation, 2046; withouten 

tvene, doubtless, 2415, 2668, 2683, 4596. 
Wene, v. suppose, 2761; {read mak'th 

[him] wene ; F. text, Qu'il se cuide) ; pr. 



s. subj. imagine, 5672; Wende, 1 //. s^ 
imagined, 4322. 

Wening", s. imagination, 2766. 

Went,//, departed, turned away, C 6185. 

[Went, pr. s. turns aside, C 6205.] Sup- 
plied by guess. 

Were, s. distraction (F. guerre), 5699; 
withouten were, without doubt (a char- 
acteristic expletive phrase, common in 
Fragment B), 1776, 2568, 2740, 3351, 
3452, 4468, 5485, 5657, 5692. 

Were, v. wear away, devour, 4752 ; ger. 
to wear, i. e. to wear away (the shore), 
4712; pr. pi. C 6215 ; pt.pl. C 6244. 

Werne, v. deny, refuse, 3443, C 6673 ; 
ger. 3730. See Warne. 

Werrey, v. war against, oppose, C 6926 ; 
ger. to make war upon, 3251 ; pr. s. wars 
against, 3699; i pr. pi. make war, C 
7018 ; Werreyed, //. warred against,^ 

3917- 
Wery, v. worry, strangle, C 6264. 
Wethers, s. gen. wether's, sheep's, C 

6259. 
Weyked, jZ>/. as adj. too weak, 4737. 
Wher, conj. whether, 2617, 5191. 
Whetted,//, sharpened, C 6197. 
Whitsonday, s. Whitsunday, 2278. Cf. 

' Garlands, Whitsunday, mjd! ; Brand's 

Pop. Antiq. s. v. Whitsun-ale. 
Whylom, adv. sometimes, 4355, 5350; 

formerly, 4123, C 7090. 
Whyte monkes, s. pi. Cistercians, i. e. 

Reformed Benedictines, C 6695. 
Wicked-Tonge i¥.Malebouche),C 7424. 
Wight, s. man, creature, C 5961. 
Wight, adj. active, 4761. 
Wilfully, adv. willingly, 4808, C 5941. 
Willen, V. desire, 2482. 
William, W. Seint Amour, C 6763, 6778. 
Wimple, s. wimple, 3864. A band usually 

of linen which covered the neck, and 

was drawn up over the chin, strained 

up each side of the face, and generally 

fastened across the forehead ; called 

also barbe, gorget, or chin-cloth. 
Winde, v. turn about, 1810; escape,. 

2056. 
Winke, v. sleep, 4568; 2pr. s. subj. 2348, 
Wis, adv. verily, C 6433. 
Wite, v. know, C 6105, 6208, 6939; Wit, v. 

3145, 5574; Wist, pt. pi. knew, C 5864; 

V\[\s\.cr\,pt. pi. subj. knew, C 6087. 
Wone, 1 pr. s. dwell, C 6143. 
Woning, s. dwelling-place, C 6082. 
Woning-places, s. pi. dwelling-places^ 

C6119. 
Wonnen, //.//. won, C 6252. 



3Blomaunt of tfjc Ivosc: Parts b, c. 



149 



'Wood., adj. mad, 3138, 3776, C 6263 ; rag- 
ing, 1921. 
Wook, \pt. s. kept awake, watched, 1877. 
"Woot./r. s. knows, 5257. 
Worche, v. work, cause, C 6052. 
Worche, v. deal (with what they have to 

do), C 6037. MS. G. has ivorthe ; Lat. 

ladies worthe = let ladies alone. The 

passage is obscure. 
Worching-es, s.pl. doings, C 6585. 
"Worth, adj. worthy, C 7104. 
W"ost, 7. pr. s. knowest (thou), 4977; 

Wostow, knowest thou, C 6075, 6373. 
Woxen,/i/>, grown, C 7140. 
Wrapped,//, s. subj. should wrap, C 6260. 
Wratthed, i pt. s. made angry, 4108 ; //. 

enraged, 3097. 
Wreke,//. revenged, 3362. 
Wrenche, s. turn, trick, 4292, 
Wreying, s. betraying, disclosure, 5220. 
Writ, p7'. s. writes, C 6585. 
Wryen, ger. to cover, C 6684 ; v. disguise, 

C 6795 ; cover up, clothe, C 6819 (F. text, 

s'afublent) . 
Wrythe, v. twist, 4359. 
Wurching", s. machination, C 6123. 
Wyte, s. blame ; to wyfe, a matter of 

reproach, 3558. 

Y. 

Yaf , pf. s. gave, 2339, 4500. 
Yalt, pr. s. rejl. betakes himself, 4904. 
See Yelde. 



Yate, s. gate, 4230. 

Yates, s.pl. gates {btit miswritten/orgdXGS, 

i. e. ways) , 5722. 
Y-bake,//. baked, C 7048. 
Y-do, //. done ; have y-do, have done ! 

1941. 
Ye, s. eye, 4264. 
Yedest, 2//. s. wentest, 3227; Yede, //. .v. 

went, 5151 ; has gone, 2585. 
Yeft, s. gift, granting, 3664. 
Yelde, v. yield, 1933; submit (thyself), C 

6283 ; ii/!p. s. yield, 1930. 
Yerne, adv. readily, eagerly, C 6719, 
Yerning-, s. affection, C 5951. 
Yeten, pp. poured out, 5702. Pp. from 

A. S. geotafi. 
Yeve, 1 pr. s. care, regard, C 6464. 
Yeving", s. giving, C 5907. 
Y-fere, adv. together, in company, 3806. 
Y-holpe,//. helped, holpen, 5505. 
Ying, adj. young, 2208. A Northern 

form. 
Y-let, pp. hidden, 5335. 
Yliche, adv. equally, alike, 3630. 
Yolden, pp. requited, 4556. See Yelde. 
Yore. adv. long ago, C 7599. 
Youth-hede, s. youthhood, 4931. 
Ypocryte, s. hypocrite, C 6482. 
Yre, s. anger, 3174. F. text, ire. 
Y-sene, adj. visible, C 6806. 
Yvel, adv. ill, 5238. 
Y-"wis, adv. certainly, 2788, 5554, 5790 ; C 

5825, 5896, 5915, 6879, 6932, 7400, 7564. 



THE END. 



u 



V 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 




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